Senate bill would require proof of citizenship to register to vote in Indiana

first_img Previous articleWinter Storm Warning issued for most of the MNC listening areaNext articleMonday marks 20 year anniversary of disappearance of Steven Kraft Jr. Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitter Senate bill would require proof of citizenship to register to vote in Indiana You would have to prove you are a citizen of the United States to register to vote in Indiana, under a bill that is being considered by the state Senate. The ACLU of Indiana says it’s unconstitutional and wouldn’t hold up if it became law and they took it to court.The bill would require you to bring a birth certificate, a passport, a Certificate of Naturalization, a Certificate of Citizenship, or proof of birth overseas, when you register.“All of these documents that have been listed, like a passport and a birth certificate, they cost money. So, that is creating a slippery slope toward a poll tax,” said Katie Blair, the director of public policy and advocacy for the ACLU of Indiana.A birth certificate costs around $20, and a passport costs around $100.She said that not only would the cost be prohibitive, but the delay in getting those kinds of documents could also get in the way of voting for a legit voter.“Those documents take a long time to process, especially during COVID. So, the financial cost and time spent obtaining these documents can be prohibitive for many Americans.”While the law, written initially by state Sen. Erin Houchin (R-Salem), may have been intended to protect election integrity by making sure only people who can vote actually vote, Blair said there’s no evidence that non-citizens are voting in large numbers.The ACLU has successfully challenged similar laws in Arizona and Kansas, she said, adding that the ACLU’s positive is that such laws are in direct violation of the National Voter Registration Act.Blair said millions of people don’t have the required documents. The proposed Indiana law could disenfranchise elderly people, people of color born in an era of official discrimination and American Indians born on reservations and not in hospitals, among others who do not have, or who can’t get the documents, but who are citizens. WhatsApp Facebook Facebook Google+ “Vote!” by H. Michael Karshls, some rights reservedcenter_img Pinterest Pinterest IndianaLocalNews Google+ By Jon Zimney – February 15, 2021 2 276 Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

Biggest gift to Divinity School

first_imgNatalie Campbell, a student in Harvard Divinity School’s (HDS) Master of Theological Studies Program, needs more than a campus. She needs a kind of second home.She commutes to class each day from Belmont and can’t easily go back and forth to School, so she often stays in Cambridge late into the evening. As a result, she needs a place not only to study, but where she can eat, relax, and connect with classmates. Unfortunately, she says those kinds of spaces are few and far between at HDS, particularly in the School’s main building, Andover Hall.“Andover Hall is the center of campus, but it really isn’t equipped to be a center of the community,” she said. “I can walk around and see no one or maybe a sprinkling of people here or there, but there’s no central place I can go and hang out with my classmates. Most students I know like to go to the Law School, Lamont, Widener, or other places removed from campus that are comfortable and have food. I wish Andover was the type of space that made people want to stay at HDS.”Harvard University’s only example of collegiate-Gothic architecture, Andover Hall is the Divinity School’s signature building. Its stone walls, soaring bell tower, impressive woodwork, and grand chapel all summon the School’s long history as a training ground for religious leaders and scholars. But while HDS has evolved beyond its origins as a residential seminary for liberal Protestant ministers, the meeting spaces that the School offers to students like Campbell have not kept pace.Now, thanks to a $25 million gift from artist and philanthropist Susan Shallcross Swartz and her husband, investor James R. Swartz ’64, Andover Hall will undergo a renewal, its first since construction more than 100 years ago, the School announced Thursday. The gift is the largest in the School’s 200-year history.“Andover Hall is the center of campus, but it really isn’t equipped to be a center of the community,” said Natalie Campbell, M.T.S. ’18. Michael Naughton/HDSDean David N. Hempton said the project has the potential to transform not only the School’s campus, but every aspect of teaching and learning at HDS.“The renewal of Andover Hall will allow us to prepare 21st-century students for lives of scholarship, ministry, service, and religiously literate leadership in all fields,” he said. “It will create new spaces that enable them to learn from each other in an atmosphere of safety, authenticity, and mutual respect. It will centralize and modernize all we do to support the academic endeavor. And it will leverage technology in new ways to bring knowledge of religion to the world far beyond our little corner of Cambridge.”A true campus centerThe vision for the new Andover Hall is of a true campus center that brings HDS’s core academic resources together with student services. Modernized classrooms with flexible spaces will encourage new ways of teaching and learning. A 200-seat auditorium will enable the School to host global leaders for conferences and public conversations on religion. A multifaith chapel will welcome the HDS community for worship, performances, and other gatherings. And the renewed Andover will have full access for all physical abilities.“Like all of Harvard, we have to adapt our spaces to meet the needs of future generations of scholars and students who will walk our halls and inhabit their roles at Harvard, and indeed the world,” said Hempton. “The exchange of ideas and knowledge — the interactions that students, faculty, guest scholars, speakers, and alumni have face-to-face — will be enhanced by a renewed physical campus.”The new Andover will also include an updated multimedia infrastructure that reflects the interconnected, technology-enhanced, multireligious reality that students inhabit, and promote research and collaboration among HDS faculty.Academic Dean Janet Gyatso knows how much new digital tools can complement and augment the work that happens on campus. Nonetheless, she says that HDS must continue to strike a balance between the “rich information and resources found online and the both wonderful and critical experience of teaching and learning together in person.”“Technology can provide amazing tools and access to knowledge,” she said. “But we should never lose sight of the deep connections and inspirations that come from working in community and proximity, and that foster value and commitment in our work.”,To encourage those connections, the School aims to create communal spaces. Particularly important because HDS is not a residential campus, social space gives students opportunities for informal learning outside of classrooms. According to Tim Whelsky, associate dean for enrollment and student services, these spaces are also critical for the School’s global recruitment efforts.“Students come to HDS in large part to engage with talented classmates who are doing exciting things,” he said. “They ask often for spaces where they can connect with one another. Filling this need is one of the most exciting parts of the vision for Andover.”The project also will put the School out front on environmental sustainability. A campus leader in the effort to confront climate change, HDS has already reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 36 percent from 2006 levels. Renewal will earn Andover at least Gold certification in Leadership in Environmental Engineering and Design (LEED) from the U.S. Green Building Council, increasing the building’s efficiency and comfort while further reducing campus emissions.“We always work to improve the sustainability of our campus, but Andover renewal will take it to another level,” said HDS Director of Operations Ralph DeFlorio. “The project will provide efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in the often extreme New England weather. The lessons learned will provide a model for other historic buildings on Harvard’s campus, and for organizations and communities confronting climate change in the years ahead.”A debt of gratitudeHDS can embark on the long-awaited project thanks to the Swartzes. Two of the School’s most devoted supporters, they have given generously for student financial aid, established the Susan Shallcross Swartz Professorship of the Practice of Christian Studies (currently occupied by the Rev. Stephanie Paulsell), and funded student programming, events, and much more.Hannah Peters, associate dean for development and external relations, said the gift will have a far-reaching effect on the School and its ongoing capital campaign.“By helping to renew our main teaching and learning space, the Swartzes increase the impact of every other gift and the effectiveness of all we do at HDS,” she said. “They are our partners in this campaign, and we are deeply indebted to them for their generosity and devotion to the School’s mission.”,Moreover, the Swartz donation will keep on giving. As Harvard’s most endowment-dependent School, HDS has little in the way of funds not restricted to a specific purpose, such as faculty support or research. Each year, the School must draw on scarce current-use funds for Andover maintenance, a list of projects that grows as the building ages. Every dollar used to patch antiquated electrical systems and plumbing is one that can’t be spent on the student experience or financial aid.“Andover Hall is the only HDS building that has not had a major renovation,” said DeFlorio. “As a result there are currently approximately 20 large capital projects that need to be done. These include windows, roof, ventilation systems, fire and safety, accessibility, and many others. If we tackle them piecemeal, it will be expensive, very disruptive, and it could take a decade to complete. Renewal not only compresses all of that, but also allows us to step back and think about how to redesign the building to improve the student experience.”Shallcross Swartz said that she and her husband wanted to extend their support to every aspect of the School’s mission with a gift that would transform HDS as it begins its third century.“Jim and I have seen the impact our previous gifts have had on the lives of HDS graduates and the communities they serve,” she said. “We are thrilled to partner with the School in its effort to make this unique and historic building an innovation lab for the future of religious education and ethical leadership.”last_img read more

The Book – Robert Kolker’s Lost Girls

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York LOST GIRLS: AN UNSOLVED AMERICAN MYSTERY BY ROBERT KOLKERI’ve made it a point to avoid anything connected to the “Long Island Serial Killer” case that results in a profit for anyone other than the victims’ families. So I had no intention of reading Robert Kolker’s just-released Lost Girls, essentially a 416-page character analysis and life history of everyone connected to the case, from the victims and their families to internet sleuths and quirky local residents.Then I was contacted by one of the victim’s family members. She was upset over what she claimed were misrepresentations in Kolker’s book and thought I had something to do with it due to the book having the same title as a series of articles I began writing when Megan Waterman disappeared in 2010, also titled Lost Girls.Although not mentioned by name, part of my Lost Girls article is quoted by Kolker in his Lost Girls book, I realized as I flipped through, so I decided to read from page one.Lost Girls, the book, expands upon an article Kolker wrote for New York Magazine in 2011, “A Serial Killer in Common.”  Drawing from an arsenal of extensive interviews, both the article and the book give a comprehensive look at all the people connected to the victims as well as the rocky pasts that led these women to the streets.The criticisms I have of this book are not in the writing or the reporting. Both are done extremely well. But, while the majority of the book is written with a non-judgmental sympathetic view of the victims, one rarely found in the mainstream media, Kolker’s Lost Girls also reads like a long-form indictment of the women’s mothers, and even grandmothers, which I imagine has added even more stress to already existing familial rifts.Whether the not-so-flattering portrayals in this book are deserved or not, it feels the reader is being told things that no one has a right to know. To state in print, no matter who the source, that one victim “despised her mother” seems unfair and unnecessary.And at a time when reality TV is the norm, personal details of who is sleeping with whom, who only dates black men, which family members didn’t visit the other in rehab, who has an eating disorder, who owes what on their mortgage and intimate sexual details of encounters with johns may not seem like a big deal. But these women are dead. And it feels like they deserve something in return for sharing their stories—or having those stories shared for them.As a book, Lost Girls is a good read, a well-written and engaging narrative that does something very important—it once again shines a light on these cases that, at least in the public eye, have gone cool. Just keep in mind as you read that this isn’t merely a story. These characters are real people and this tragic tale doesn’t end for them, as it ends for you, when the book does.Shannan Gilbert’s case will be featured on an updated episode of 48 Hours on CBS Saturday, July 20 at 10 p.m. The original episode aired in July 2011.last_img read more

Iranians fearful and struggling to cope as virus spreads

first_img“It’s extremely hard for us but I can’t take a taxi or bus to go somewhere even if my feet hurt” from walking, said Parmis’ mother Shahpar.”My daughter was depressed at home, so I brought her out shopping to cheer her up,” said the 45-year-old housewife.”They [the children] haven’t been going to school, and they are scared of the virus,” she told AFP.As she spoke, cars and buses flew past at irregular intervals after sling-shooting out of Vanak Square — one of the capital’s biggest intersections where traffic normally snarls at that time of day. Topics : Gone too was the pollution that usually shrouds the sprawling city of more than eight million, thanks at least in part to the reduced congestion.That was of little comfort to 39-year-old architect Pejman, who expressed fears about the spread of the novel coronavirus.”The disease has disrupted our lives. We are scared. There are no masks, and no alcohol for disinfection. People need them but cannot find them,” he told AFP.’People are frightened’ Businesses are suffering too.Pejman said some of his work colleagues were suspected of having the virus and ordered to stay away at home.”It has had a bad effect on our company. They now test our temperatures every morning before we enter the office,” he said.The economic slowdown was tangible on the streets.Shop assistants passed the time by playing games, cleaners meticulously wiped down the doors and windows of empty restaurants, and taxis sat idle on the side of the road waiting for customers.”The streets are empty,” Jamshidi said as his taxi driver colleagues shared a meal and engaged in rowdy banter.”It’s my job to… take people where they need to go, but nobody is leaving their homes to go anywhere,” he told AFP. “If the situation remains like this, we won’t have enough money to eat. Yesterday I earned very little and so far today I haven’t had any passengers.”Hamid Bayot, who owns a juice shop on Vanat Square, said sales were down by 80 percent since the coronavirus outbreak emerged last month.And that is despite steps the business has taken to reassure its customers.”We disinfect everything three times every day. But people are frightened and haven’t been buying anything from us,” said Bayot.”If the situation remains like this, we’ll go bankrupt and we will have to close our shop.”In an apparent bid to cure the boredom of youths, state television has been airing light-hearted shows on its typically austere news channel.It has shown blooper home videos in the past few days and on Monday it broadcast a Pink Panther cartoon as well as the trailer of The Revenant, a film starring Leonardo DiCaprio.”We have to stay at home and do nothing. We can’t see our friends and we are no longer happy,” Parmis said grudgingly through the face mask given to her by her mother. center_img Cooped up at home for days because of Iran’s coronavirus outbreak, Parmis Hashemi was desperate, so her mother took her shopping — even though they only had one mask between them.Despite their fears of catching the disease, the mother and her 13-year-old daughter were out pounding the unusually quiet streets of downtown Tehran on Monday afternoon as officials announced yet another spike in deaths and infections.Schools have been shut across the country as part of measures aimed at stemming the rapid spread of COVID-19, the virus that has now claimed 66 lives out of more than 1,500 cases in Iran.last_img read more

Calum Chambers reveals Freddie Ljungberg’s message to Arsenal players after Emery sacking

first_img Comment Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 2 Dec 2019 9:48 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link522Shares Ljungberg gives presser after Arsenal’s 2-2 draw with NorwichTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 5:06FullscreenLjungberg gives presser after Arsenal’s 2-2 draw with Norwichhttps://metro.co.uk/video/ljungberg-gives-presser-arsenals-2-2-draw-norwich-2060662/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.After the draw, in which Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang twice scored to bring the Gunners level, Chambers revealed the message Ljungberg had given to his troops as he looks to turn their fortunes around.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘Obviously conceding goals is never good, he told Premier League Productions.‘The way we want to play, we want to play attacking football and have some flair, but obviously we’ve got to have a balance and shut the back door as well.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘That’s something I’m sure we’ll concentrate on.‘But I think the main message from Freddie was for us to go back out and enjoy playing football and enjoy doing what we’re good at.‘I think there were spells today where we did that and showed that. There are obviously things we need to work on as well.’Should Ljungberg get the full-time job at Arsenal?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your results Advertisement Calum Chambers reveals Freddie Ljungberg’s message to Arsenal players after Emery sacking Ljungberg could only secure a draw in his first game in charge (Picture: AFP/Getty)Freddie Ljungberg told Arsenal players they need to start enjoying their football again after Unai Emery was sacked, Calum Chambers has revealed.The former Gunners ace has taken temporary charge at the Emirates after Emery was dismissed following a miserable start to the season.Ljungberg’s first game in charge didn’t yield an immediate upturn in performance not result. Arsenal drew 2-2 against Norwich and were at times overrun by Daniel Farke’s newly-promoted side.last_img read more

Governor Wolf Signs Bill To Promote Study of Computer Science in High School

first_img Bill Signing,  Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – As part of the 2016-17 budget, Governor Tom Wolf signed into a law a bill that allows course work in computer science and information technology to count toward high school graduation.“There is a consistent and expanding need in Pennsylvania’s economy for a workforce with 21st century computer and information technology skills,” Governor Wolf said. “For too long, however, students pursuing these types of classes were not able to get credit towards their degree – they were treated as electives. We have now changed that and given interested students real incentive to pursue this career path early on.”House Bill 833 amends the Public School Code Section 1605 – Courses of Study. Beginning with students graduating at the end of the 2016-17 school from a public high school and each year after, a student who completes a course in computer science or information technology during grades 9-12 will be permitted to apply up to one credit earned for completion of such course to satisfy the student’s mathematics or science credit requirement for graduation.The governing body of the student’s public high school will have discretion to determine the graduation credit requirement to which the credit earned by the student shall be applied.“Incorporating computer science coursework into school curriculum will ensure that students today can explore the careers of tomorrow and leave high school prepared for the evolving workforce,” said Secretary of Education Pedro Rivera. “As demand for high priority occupations grows, it is a commonsense measure to provide paths to success in those fields during a student’s K-12 education.  This change will not only teach students critical skills and information in computer science, it will keep them active and engaged in learning.”For the purpose of this bill, “public high school” will mean a public school, including a school within a school district, a charter school, a cyber charter school, a regional charter school or an area vocational-technical school that offers grade 12.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf Signs Bill To Promote Study of Computer Science in High School July 21, 2016center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Governor Wolf Allocates Additional Resources for Snow Removal in Northeast PA

first_img March 17, 2017 Press Release,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today provided an update on the state’s continued response to cleanup efforts in Northeast Pennsylvania following Tuesday’s snow storm. Specifically, the governor announced that Pennsylvania Game Commission resources will be utilized to help assist the City of Wilkes-Barre with snow removal.“The aftermath of Winter Storm Stella has left many communities in the northeast stretched so thin, they simply aren’t able to dig out on their own,” said Governor Wolf. “We are working closely with the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency (PEMA) to meet the needs of these municipalities as quickly as possible, and in some cases, that means reallocating our resources and heavy equipment from state agencies like the Game Commission.”The Game Commission is providing ten-ton dump trucks, backhoes and snow plows – run by Game Commission operators – to the City of Wilkes-Barre, which had filed a request with PEMA for assistance with snow removal.Governor Wolf has allocated additional PennDOT resources, including loaders and dump trucks, to the City of Hazleton to help with snow removal there. PennDOT has also directed salt suppliers, through its contract through the Department of General Services, to replenish the salt supplies of municipalities’ in the heaviest-impacted areas prior to supplying salt to the department, should salt be requested.“Helping to keep the public safe is our top priority and we’ve been working around the clock on that mission through this storm,” PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards said. “We’re happy to assist our local partners when we’re able to share our resources.”Over the course of the last three days, PEMA personnel coordinated state resources to municipalities that requested snow removal assistance in both Luzerne and Wyoming counties. PEMA staff also provided guidance to counties for ways to seek support from local volunteer organizations for needs such as meal and medication delivery and shoveling private properties for those unable to do so.“Recovering from a significant event like this is truly a team effort,” said PEMA Director Richard D. Flinn Jr. “We will continue to work with impacted counties to ensure that whatever assistance the state can provide is offered in those areas.”Additionally, the Pennsylvania National Guard was tasked with missions in Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Monroe, Northampton, Schuylkill, Susquehanna, and Wayne counties to support law enforcement operations, emergency management, and 9-1-1 staff transport, as well transport of medical personnel to vital healthcare facilities. During the height of the storm, the Pennsylvania National Guard, Pennsylvania State Police, PennDOT,and the Department of Health also coordinated an emergency 80-mile transport of a 23-month old child in need of urgent medical care from Pocono Medical Center in East Stroudsburg to Geisinger Medical Center in Danville.Before the storm, Governor Wolf made a Proclamation of Disaster Emergency, which allows for the commonwealth to get resources to communities as quickly as possible when requested. Governor Wolf and PennDOT directed Three Mobile Equipment Teams to the northeast, in addition to the resources that were currently deployed there. Each team consisted of five plow trucks, 10 equipment operators, and one supervisor. Teams were dispatched from PennDOT’s northwestern Pennsylvania district to the Scranton area, from the Pittsburgh-area district to Monroe County near Stroudsburg, and from southwestern Pennsylvania to the Lehigh Valley area.PEMA continues working diligently to process municipality resource requests by working with the counties. In addition, six PEMA staff were deployed as liaison officers to work in county emergency management offices where requested: Bucks, Carbon, Franklin, Lackawanna, Lancaster and Union counties.It will take several days for storm costs to be reviewed and submitted to PEMA. PEMA encourages municipal governments to track damages and costs and report them to their respective county emergency management agency.Motorists can continue to check conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles, including color-coded winter conditions on 2,900 miles by visiting http://www.511PA.com. PennDOT’s Automated Vehicle Locator plow tracking tool is available for all of the more than 2,200 PennDOT-owned and rented plow trucks, with vehicle locations viewable on 511PA. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Governor Wolf Allocates Additional Resources for Snow Removal in Northeast PAlast_img read more

Mortgagee auction of brand new Greenslopes house has surprise twist

first_imgThis house at 25 Merinda Street, Greenslopes sold under the hammer for $1.265 million.A BRAND new tri-storey house, forced to auction after the developer defaulted on a loan, sold for $1.265 million yesterday.There were wooden spoons for bidding paddles at the auction of 25 Merinda St, Greenslopes but from the moment the auction began it was clear this was to be a slow cooked affair, not a stir-fry.There were only two public bids in the 30-minute auction and the eventual buyer never took the wooden spoon out of his jacket pocket.MORE REAL ESTATE STORIES McGrath Bulimba-Balmoral estate agent Gunther Behrendt and the buyers of 25 Merinda St, Greenslopes, go through the paperwork after the auction.“Wow, they’ve got a bargain,” said one woman who’d lived in the area for 30 years.Mr Lin, who lives in the inner city, had been looking for a house for his son for six months and was ‘pretty excited’ by the result.“I reckon we got a good price,” he said.“A mortgagee sale always attracts people who come to buy.” “It is strategy,” new owner James Lin said after the auction.“You don’t bid initially, it won’t work. You only waste your time.“I always buy the property like that, I wait to see where it settles and then bid through that.”A $25,000 marketing campaign brought seven registered bidders to the five-bedroom property on 405sq m and they were among 45 people who lined the walls and sat on the coach, with a six metre void above them in the main living area. The growth suburbs to watch The living area where people gathered for the 11am auction.Moments before the auction started, McGrath auctioneer Justin Marsden was told the reserve price.“Being a mortgagee and control auction we are not aware of the reserve until the auction starts,” McGrath Bulimba-Balmoral agent Gunther Behrendt said afterwards.“I have no idea where the price is throughout the whole campaign. I still don’t know what it is, only the auctioneer knows, which is fine because we go about our business the same way.”A representative of the property, who was waiting in a front room, instructed Mr Marsden to drop the reserve price during the auction to secure its eventual sale. The auction opened with a bid of $900,000 from the couch, where a couple and their toddler were lounging comfortably. There was an answering bid of $1 million from someone in the kitchen. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoThe view toward the kitchen where bidders were standing.“We’ve had better offers than this prior to as you’d expect,” Mr Marsden told the crowd.“If it passes in it goes behind closed doors.”The auctioneer then made a vendor bid of $1.2 million before hitting the pause button.Mr Lin and his family were standing near the walk-in pantry and for the best part of half an hour, the real estate agent and auctioneer pounded the tiles between them and other bidders in an effort to bring the price closer to its reserve.“They’re working hard,” one onlooker said.During those private negotiations, Mr Lin made his first offer of $1.25 million and then increased it to $1.265 million. Mr Marsden returned to announce the property was on the market and with no further bids, it sold under the hammer. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK The new owner of 25 Merinda St, Greenslopes, Daniel Lin (centre) with his parents James Lin and Chen Hueijung.“That was very stressful,” Mr Behrendt said when he finally got to sit on the couch after the auction.“The job of an auction agent is to get bidders to property. The bidding to inspection ratio was pretty good, one to six. The market was here.”Mr Marsden agreed: “I would have thought you would have had more bidding from people but it just goes to show that people are still a little apprehensive but when someone else sees that there is good value in the market place they are happy to purchase.”Locals in the 45-strong crowd, who had watched the house being built over a two-year period, were surprised by the result. Inside the dream home you can rent for $20,000 a daylast_img read more

Queensland’s top spots to go glamping revealed

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:38Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen5 tips for first home buyers01:39 A restored Queensland train carriage, Glass House Mountains. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub.Ms Grant said while hotels were much easier to plan and travel to, there was something special about being secluded on a lake, compared to taking a dip in a hotel pool. “With social media gaining popularity, staying in a refurbished barn or a luxury safari tent is much more “Instagram-able” than your typical hotel set up,” she said.“Especially when the accommodation resides in a valley between mountains, overlooks the coast or is nestled into a rainforest.” ISLAND THAT’S A MAGNET FOR A-LISTERS Glamping Hub’s Laura Grant said property owners had become more creative with their spaces.“I have seen refurbished ambulances or school buses as well as gypsy caravans and tipis,” Ms Grant said.“Transforming spaces is definitely a big part of glamping since there are plenty of renovated barns, cabooses or storage containers. But, many will build brand new tree houses, cabins or tiny homes too. “Since glamping has been around for a few years, a safari tent or yurt is a bit more typical, but definitely still plays a major role in what glamping is.” She said nature-based accommodation were at the top of the list for glampers.“Our total audience in Australia is currently growing 25 per cent year over year,” she said. Restored Queensland train carriage, Glass House Mountains. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub.Queenslanders are swapping swanky hotels and resorts for luxury tents and tree houses as a desire to connect with the great outdoors drives a new generation of happy glampers.With a desire to connect to nature, glamping — an upscaled version of camping — is growing in popularity with unique short stays proving popular.Data from Glamping Hub shows refurbished shipping containers and pods allow users to immerse themselves in nature, without sacrificing some basic, and sometimes very extravagant, amenities. MORE: PROJECT WITH A ‘DRY SPA’ Source: Glamping Hub LUXURY RIVERSIDE UNITS SELLING FAST Top five accommodations booked in Queensland 2019 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:55Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:55 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenIslands for sale around Australia00:55 Eco-Friendly rental perfect for a getaway at Agnes Water, Queensland. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub. “When a traveller feels connected to a destination, it makes them want to come visit again and tell their friends about it which is obviously good news for tourism”.Ms Grant said there was a major surge in searches online for luxury tents. “This year’s list of top booked accommodations are tents. This holds true to the top booked accommodations in all of Australia as well,” she said.Also a hit with glampers is the Victorian train carriage in the Glass House Mountains, one of only 23 built between the years 1882 and 1886, and the only one owned privately. The restored carriage has a double size bed in a carpeted bedroom. An eco-friendly rental perfect for a getaway at Agnes Water, Queensland. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub.The top three accommodations booked in Queensland last year included a family-friendly cottage with a hot tub at Wongawallan, a riverfront cottage rental on a working farm near Imbil, and a treehouse near Noosa Heads.Tourism and Event Queensland CEO Leanne Coddington said the state was home to some of the world’s best natural assets, be it the Great Barrier Reef or the Daintree Rainforest, world-class islands or iconic beaches.“It’s no surprise that travellers want to be a part of that,” she said.“We know that today’s travellers want to do so much more than just visit a place to tick it off a list. They want to experience what it is like to immerse themselves in a destination and a huge part of that is feeling connected to the natural environment. Inside the treehouse near Maleny. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago Treehouse with spa bath near Maleny. Photo: Supplied by Glamping Hub. 1- Safari tent, Diddillibah2- Luxury tent for couples, Point Lookout, North Stradbroke3- Studio-style tent with deck, Amamoor4- Restored Queensland train carriage, Glass House Mountains5- Rainforest cabana, Mission Beachlast_img read more

Tellurian lining up partners for Driftwood LNG

first_imgImage courtesy of TellurianThe Houston-based LNG export project developer Tellurian said 20 companies have shown interest in partnering the company on its Driftwood LNG terminal project. The company, founded by Charif Souki and Martin Houston, is developing a 27.6 mtpa LNG export facility and an associated pipeline in Louisiana.Tellurian president and CEO Meg Gentle, said, “There are more than 20 companies conducting detailed analysis in our data room for Driftwood Holdings and we expect to be able to identify our partners soon.”Gentle added the company intends to start the construction of the facility in 2019 and produce first LNG in 2023.In its quarterly report, Tellurian reminded it has initiated the process to raise $24 billion for Driftwood Holdings, which will own the Driftwood liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility, one or more pipelines, and natural gas production assets.The company generated approximately $6 million in revenue from LNG marketing, and ended its first quarter of 2018 with approximately $112.5 million of cash and cash equivalents, remaining debt free.last_img read more