Research Technologist

first_img Similar jobs Facebook The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Salary Not Specified Johns Hopkins University Salary Not Specified Research Technologist Share Johns HopkinsBayview Maryland, United States Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) Maryland, United States Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Research Technologist Twitter Save Research Technologist Save Research Technologist You need to sign in or create an account to save Research Technologist Salary Not Specified LinkedIn Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Johns Hopkins University Maryland, United States Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Save Research Technologist More searches like this Research Administration Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore You need to sign in or create an account to save General Summary/Purpose:The Johns Hopkins School of Medicineis hiring a full-time employee to provide laboratory support and toassist with research coordination for multiple research studiesrelated to Cerebrospinal FluidDisorders.Specific Duties &Responsibilities:Theindividual will be involved in, but not limited to, key laboratoryduties, such as handling human biospecimens, biospecimen collectionand processing, biospecimen inventory and management, ELISAs,Western Blot, and DNAextraction.Clinicduties include neuropsychological testing and other patienttesting.Additional duties include dataentry, cleaning of glassware, and/or other laboratory housekeepingtasks.This position also involves beingon-call for laboratory emergencies in a rotating scheduleespecially for power and freezeroutages.Minimum Qualifications(mandatory):Bachelor’s degree in biology, chemistry or relatedfield.Mustbe proficient in Microsoft Office Programs such as Word, Powerpoint, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.PreferredQualifications:Somerelated post-undergraduate work experiencepreferred.Special Knowledge, Skills, andAbilities:Excellent time management,punctuality, written and verbal communication, and record keepingskills arepreferred.Classified Title:ResearchTechnologistWorking Title: ResearchTechnologist ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ACRO40/E/02/CC Starting Salary Range:$14.14-$19.44 per hour(commensurate with experience)Employee group: Full Time Schedule: Monday-Friday/8:30am-5:00pm Exempt Status: Non-ExemptLocation: 33-MD:Johns Hopkins Bayview Department name: 10003524-SOM Neuro NeuromuscularPersonnel area: School of MedicineThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Chief Business Officers & Vice Presidents Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

Surrogate Judge Susan Sheppard Begins Her State Senate Hearings for the New Jersey Superior…

first_imgCape May County Surrogate Susan Sheppard  By Ryan GivensA local Ocean City attorney and judge’s career takes a major step forward after hearings began yesterday. Susan Sheppard sat in front of the State Senate Judiciary Committee amid the initial hearing for her appointment to a position on the bench of the New Jersey Superior Court. This begins the process of Senate approval after Sheppard’s appointment by Governor Chris Christie earlier this month.Sheppard has had a long career in law, beginning work in Pennsylvania for the firm of  Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley in 1991, after graduating Cum Laude from Widener University Law School. She continued her career in New Jersey working for McCabe, Weisberg & Conway. In the public realm, Sheppard served from 2003 to 2006 as the Assistant City Solicitor of Atlantic City. She was first elected in Ocean City as the 3rd Ward Councilwoman holding the position from 2008 until 2011, and served as Council President from 2009 to 2010.  Late in 2010, she was elected to the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders and served as Vice-Director.  Sheppard currently sits as the Surrogate Judge of Cape May County, after being elected in 2012 . She also continues to run her own law firm centered in Ocean City.Sheppard has shown continued commitment to the community serving and dedicating herself to her public and civic duties. Pending State Senate approval, she will take the next step in her career as a judge in the State Superior Court.OCNJ Daily was able to speak with Surrogate Sheppard yesterday after her hearing.  She stated “I am humbled and honored.  It has been a lifelong dream of mine to follow in the footsteps of my father. I can not think of anything more fulfilling than to serve the public as a Superior Court Judge”Sheppard may just get her wish. OCNJ Daily will update you as soon as we have breaking news.last_img read more

Fatality explored

first_imgA fatal accident enquiry into the death of a bakery forklift driver started last week. Glasgow’s Sheriff’s Court will investigate the causes behind the death of agency driver Graham Meldrum in 2005. He was killed by a truck’s tail-lift as he unloaded bread at the Allied Bakeries factory in Balmore industrial estate, Lambhill.Last November, Allied was fined £19,500, after admitting three health and safety breaches. TNT Logistics, which supplied the vehicle, was fined £14,000 after admitting a single breach. Meldrum’s family and colleagues then campaigned for a full enquiry, which was granted last year. Family and friends held a vigil outside the courthouse as the enquiry got under way.last_img read more

Burton’s Biscuits closes in on Fox’s deal

first_imgBurton’s Biscuits is reported to be closing in on a £330m deal to purchase rival brand, Fox’s.Industry sources have told Sky News that although, in the past, talks for Burton’s to buy Fox’s had failed, the deal was far more likely to go through this time, and Burton’s was on the verge of entering exclusive talks with the brand’s owner 2 Sisters.If negotiations are successful, the deal is expected to prompt Burton’s to auction its licence to produce Cadbury-branded biscuits, with possible buyers including Mondelēz, which bought Cadbury in 2010.2 Sisters has experienced a difficult trading period of late – its last annual results to 1 August 2015 saw sales tumble 8.2% to £3.14bn. At the time, the company described the biscuit market as “under pressure for some time due to intense competition”.A deal would make Burton’s a larger competitor to United Biscuits, though it is unlikely any official announcement will be made for several weeks.A Burton’s Biscuits spokesperson told British Baker: “We do not comment on speculation of this nature.”last_img read more

Memories of Armageddon

first_imgIt weighed close to 9,000 pounds, was dubbed “Little Boy,” and exploded about 1,800 feet above Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. The heat of the initial blast rivaled the temperature of the sun’s surface. By some estimates, it killed 100,000 people instantly.A young girl at the time, artist Junko Kayashige was only a mile from where a U.S. plane dropped the first of two atomic bombs on Japan. She suffered serious burns to her face, neck, and right arm, and lost several members of her family, including two sisters. On Aug. 9, the second bomb fell on Nagasaki, effectively ending World War II.Sixty-six years later, the artist and activist is showing her work in America for the first time in an effort to ensure such horror is never repeated.A new exhibition at the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Monroe C. Gutman Library, “With Hiroshima Eyes: The Hibakusha Art of Junko Kayashige,” depicts a series of evocative images inspired by Kayashige’s experience as a “Hibakusha,” an atomic bomb survivor.A longtime activist for peace and nuclear disarmament, she writes of her work, “I wanted to depict the foolishness of humans who attempt to solve problems with war and destruction. It is hard for me to revisit and recount my experience, but nuclear weapons are still threatening our lives.”Joe Gerson, director of programs and national disarmament coordinator for the New England branch of the American Friends Service Committee, the Quaker-based peace and justice organization that supports eliminating nuclear weapons, met Kayashige during a trip to Japan in the 1980s. He helped connect her with the Harvard space, where he hopes her art and message will reach a wider audience.“We are not really talking about the depths of the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” said Gerson, “and what people who lived through it have carried with them all their lives, not only in terms of the constant fear of cancer or other radiation diseases … but also the memories of hell on earth. Imagine a city destroyed in nine seconds.”During her career, Kayashige, who was a public school art teacher for 38 years, has created works that capture lasting devastation.The view from an airplane window inspired the show’s chilling image “Faces II.” In the painting, a collection of blurred faces is partially covered in darkness.“I was looking down on the town underneath my airplane, and I looked at one of the shadows of one of the wings of the airplane … and I was thinking that the pilots on the Enola Gay might have been looking at the same image,” said Kayashige through an interpreter.The show has strong Harvard connections. Included in the exhibition, along with books about Hiroshima and its survivors and some house tiles that were melted from the blast, is an Easter egg that was delivered to former Harvard Professor Edwin O. Reischauer (for whom Harvard’s Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies is named) while he served as the U.S. ambassador to Japan in the 1960s. The message on the painted egg calls for ending nuclear weapons tests.Former Harvard President James Bryant Conant was a member of the interim committee composed of government officials and scientists who advised President Harry Truman on the use of nuclear energy and weaponry. The group recommended using the atomic bomb, if needed.Lurking just below the surface of many of Kayashige’s works is the haunting subtext of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Subjects like destruction and mortality inform much of the art on display. One painting evokes Japan’s recent devastating earthquake and tsunami, another reflects the artist’s struggles with aging and her declining health. In “I Cannot Fly,” the feet on an animal-like figure point to the left, while its head looks awkwardly to the right. The picture relates to her two debilitating strokes.“I wanted to express the feeling of myself,” said Kayashige, “who cannot do anything.”A mirage and a friend who was dying from cancer inspired the gripping work “Mirage II,” hanging in the library’s main lobby.“When I was drawing this painting, I was hoping that his death would be a mirage, like something that disappears,” said Kayashige. … That his death would be an illusion.”Since 2006, the library’s first-floor reading area has acted as an informal gallery space. Begun as a way to help showcase art by students affiliated with the school’s Arts in Education Program, organizers soon included other Harvard artists and eventually those from outside the Harvard community. For the past three years students from the AIE program has served as the library’s art curator and gallery manager, helping plan and coordinate the revolving exhibitions.“The students have really added a level of professionalism and commitment to these shows,” said library director John Collins. The works of art “enrich our lives in many ways.”Collins said Kayashige’s pictures offer viewers a compelling story and a vital connection to the period. “We can view this art with a sense of history,” he said, “and with a sense of empathy.”For Gerson, the works of his longtime friend afford students and the wider Harvard community an important opportunity to “have an intimation of what Hiroshima was about, and some of the life force that endures.”Kayashige will give a gallery talk Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m. The exhibit, which is on display through October, will be the last show in the space before the library undergoes renovation for several months.last_img read more

College finishes construction

first_imgAfter five years of construction, $8,570,000 worth of renovations on Saint Mary’s Madeleva Hall were completed in time for the 2013-2014 school year, director of energy management Ben Bowman said.  The renovations, which began in 2008, were composed of three project phases: the interior gutting, east and west side landscape changes and the window project. “We first began by gutting the entire interior of the building,” Bowman said. “We remodeled everything, took out all of the interior walls and even took out the mechanical system. That system includes heating, air conditioning, plumbing and ventilation.” This first phase of the project cost the College $7,000,0000 and was the first remodeling effort done to the building since it was built in 1967, Bowman said. This phase of the project was completed in 2009. “The building was due for a remodeling,” College President Carol Ann Mooney said. “It is now a very different building than it was and is better able to serve faculty and students.”  The second phase of the project began in 2010 and started with the remodeling of the west side landscape, Bowman said. “We really revamped the landscape outside of the building during this phase of the project,” he said. “During the west side remodeling, we worked to meet the standard requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.”   Work on the east side landscape began in 2011, Bowman said. “This is when we created the outdoor education space that has the labyrinth out there,” Bowman said. “This is a great place for students to meet. I even know of some math professors who roll white boards out there and teach class outdoors.” Bowman said the last phase of the project began in 2012 with the start of the window replacement. “Madeleva is 70,000 square feet, and approximately 50 percent of the building is composed of glass or windows,” Bowman said. “Therefore, it is important that these windows provide good insulation.” Before the window replacement, Bowman said the windows blocked only 40 percent of the sun’s heat.  “The original windows were single-paned,” Bowman said. “During the summer, you could feel the heat radiating off of the windows while standing inside, and in the winter, frost would formulate on the inside.”  With the installation of double-paned windows, Bowman said the College saves anywhere from 30 to 50 percent of energy costs.  “The new windows we went with are one-inch and double-pane insulated with two sheets of glass,” Bowman said. “It blocks 90 percent of the heat gain, so on the inside you only feel 10 percent of the sun’s heat coming into the space, reducing the energy for heating and cooling in the building. Essentially, the building is more eco-friendly.”  Bowman said the window project marked the finish of the five-year renovations, but the department is looking to renovate the north side landscape of the Hall. “The only side we didn’t touch is the north side of Madeleva,” Bowman said. “What we are looking at now is renovating this space into what would be called Sr. Madeleva Gardens. We currently have a dedication for her at this entrance and it would be nice for this dedication to extend outside.” Bowman said he has been working with grounds services to draw up visions for the garden, but as of now, these plans are only potential donor opportunities. “We have a strict policy of not starting construction projects until we have raised the money,” Mooney said. “That is the reason we won’t have any major visible construction projects on campus during this school year.”  Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

Construction continues on campus

first_imgEmma Farnan | The Observer Students returned from winter break to a campus covered with snow and bustling with construction, including renovations to Hesburgh Library and the construction of two new residence halls. Construction began on Corbett Family Hall and Duncan Family Hall, both part of the Campus Crossroads project, in the fall of 2014 and is expected to be completed in the summer of 2017. Construction on the Music and Sacred Music Hall, also part of the Campus Crossroads project, began in the fall of 2015 and is expected to be completed in the summer of 2017.Doug Marsh, associate vice president and University architect, said in an email that the projects continue to progress on their anticipated timelines.“Work actually continues throughout winter and only stops during the coldest and snowiest or rainiest of days​,” he said. “​The concourse space of the Hesburgh Library will be re-opened the week after spring break. McCourtney Hall and the two new residence halls will open in August.​”Marsh said the projects are meeting all their anticipated milestones, including those for costs.“There are no changes anticipated in the construction impacts on the surrounding campus for the Spring Semester,” he said.Construction on McCourtney Hall began in the summer of 2014 and will be expected to be completed in the fall of 2016. Jenkins Hall and Nanovic Hall began last summer and is expected to be completed in the summer of 2017.More information regarding construction projects and renovations taking place around campus can be found at construction.nd.eduTags: Campus Crossroadslast_img read more

Bolivia Will Continue Negotiating Maritime Demand with Chile and Praises Peru

first_img President Evo Morales said that Bolivia will continue negotiating with Chile for sovereign access to the Pacific Ocean, something that it lost in a nineteenth-century war, at the same time that he praised a recent maritime agreement with his Peruvian colleague Alan García. “Negotiations are not negotiated publicly, politically, or in a partisan way; rather, it’s an ongoing task of sensitization. I have a great deal of hope that Bolivia may be able to return to the sea,” the president said during a public event to commemorate the anniversary of the Bolivian Navy. “(I am) almost convinced that in the next few years, there will be new news, good news for the Bolivian people,” the president affirmed, after recalling that there are proposals from “humanist parties, social movements, and legislative authorities” in Chile to respond to the Bolivian demand. Bolivia and Chile, which have lacked diplomatic relations since 1978, have maintained a dialogue at the level of deputy foreign ministers since 2006, on a thirteen-point agenda that includes the issue of access to the Pacific. The Bolivians maintain hope of recovering their country’s maritime component, which they lost in a war in 1879, in which Peru also participated. At the same event, Morales also praised the agreement signed last month with his Peruvian counterpart Alan García, which grants Bolivia usufruct facilities for ninety-nine years in the tourist, trade, industrial, and military areas in the port of Ilo, 1,250 km south of Lima. “To express to President Alan García, his administration, and the Peruvian people, in the name of the Bolivian people, our just recognition. The Bolivian people will never forget this historic, unprecedented step in order that Bolivia, little by little, may return to the sea, may return to the Pacific Ocean,” the president affirmed. By Dialogo November 09, 2010last_img read more

El Salvador Receives Speedboat to Strengthen Narcotrafficking Fight

first_imgBy Lorena Baires/Diálogo August 12, 2020 The U.S. government donated a Boston Whaler speedboat to the Salvadoran Navy’s Trident Naval Task Force (FTNT, in Spanish) to strengthen border security and drug interception operations in the Pacific Ocean, the U.S. Embassy in El Salvador said in a statement on June 18. The donation is worth $1.5 million and includes logistics and maintenance training.“We use these units to fight narcotrafficking; they deliver excellent results in maritime interdiction operations,” Captain Exón Oswaldo Ascencio Albeño, head of the Salvadoran Navy General Staff, told Diálogo on July 13. “We received eight of them in previous years, and the FTNT uses them in our territorial sea.”The FTNT began in 2015 as an elite counternarcotics force, “and over the years, it has forced narcotrafficking rings to travel out of the Salvadoran 200-mile territorial sea,” Salvadoran Navy Lieutenant Misael Vanegas, FTNT commander, told Diálogo on July 15.“The Task Force consists of seamen and marines. Just before the pandemic started, in February, we had the opportunity to train with the U.S. Marine Corps at La Unión [department] Naval Base, and to do another training with the [U.S.] Military Group El Salvador to form leaders for small naval units,” Capt. Ascencio said. “The latter is aimed at officers and noncommissioned officers from Trident, and it helped prepare commanders of naval units to lead their crews during maritime interdiction operations.”Since 2011, the U.S. government, through the Department of Defense and U.S. Southern Command, has been offering support to the Salvadoran government in the fight against narcotrafficking in the Central American region. Since then, the Department of Defense has donated 37-foot long Boston Whaler vessels, night vision equipment, J8 Jeeps, and Harris radios and communications equipment, the U.S. Embassy said.last_img read more

How fintech is beating credit unions at their own game

first_imgCredit unions talk a big game about teaching members good financial behaviors, but fintech is eating the movement’s lunch when it comes to helping consumers save money.One of the leaders in that effort is Acorns, an app that connects to a user’s credit or debit cards and rounds up purchases to the next dollar, holding the accumulated difference in escrow and investing it with a risk portfolio determined by the user. The service costs just $1 per month for balances of less than $5,000 and users can withdraw their funds at any time.As of about 2015, said Karim Habib, director of lending solutions at CUNA Mutual Group, Acorns – to say nothing of other fintechs offering similar services – had 650,000 members (many of them millennials) with a combined savings of approximately $25 million. Acorns officials did not respond to CU Journal’s request for updated statistics.Round-up savings isn’t a new idea – Bank of America has offered its Keep the Change feature for more than a decade, rounding up every debit card purchase to the next dollar and depositing the difference into a savings account cost-free – yet the vast majority of credit unions haven’t embraced the concept. continue reading » 26SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more