Bans office unaware of instructions to families of missing

Question posed on Sri Lanka at the press conference at the UN in New York:Question:  Okay.  All right. I wanted to ask you a Sri Lanka question, while this grouping is still there.  There’s a UN working group on enforced disappearances that’s visiting Sri Lanka, including northern Sri Lanka.  But I wanted to… maybe this is not true, but the “Colombo Gazette” relate… says that families whose people have been disappeared, who met with UN working group, including the widow of Prageeth [Eknaligoda], the cartoonist, were told, quote, by the UN not to speak to the media about their discussions with the working group.  It says “the UN.”  So it’s… The New York office of UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said it was unaware of instructions issued to the families of missing in Sri Lanka not to speak to the media on their meeting with the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances held this week.Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesman for the UN Secretary-General said, in response to a question posed at a press conference at the UN in New York, that he is not aware if any instructions had been issued by the UN office in Sri Lanka. Spokesman:  I don’t… When journalists asked Sandhya Eknaligoda, the wife of missing journalist Prageeth Eknaligoda regarding a meeting she had two days ago with the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances at the UN office in Colombo, Eknaligoda said that she could not comment. Correspondent:  Is there…Spokesman:  You can ask our colleagues in Geneva, who kind of help back up these independent working groups, but it’s not something I can answer from here “I told them about by concerns. The meeting went well. They will announce their response next week,” she said.When asked by journalists who took part in the meeting, Eknaligoda refused to comment nor did she wish to state who in the UN told her not to speak to the media. (Colombo Gazette) She said that the the UN told her not to speak to the media and that the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances would brief the media next week. read more

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Employing mining information in its spatial context

Where spatial placement of planning and production information might be a “nice to have” for some businesses, GMSI (mining subsidiary of the Gijima group) believes that the future of enterprise mining solutions is in employing information in its spatial context. GMSI’s mineRP is an enterprise framework for integrating all elements of mine resource planning, presenting the industry with a real breakthrough in spatial data management. More than just providing a common location and processes for storing and retrieving spatial information files (such as geological models; designs, schedules, etc.), mineRP is the world’s first truly integrated mining technical solutions framework where mining data is integrated at the lowest data level, the company says. Based on GMSI’s spatialDB, mines can manage mining data with a MS SQL Server based, OGC compliant data store containing both three dimensional spatial information and related business data in one place.  Storing, merging, collating and publishing spatially relevant mining technical information is done using this central repository – resulting in up to date and standardised information being available to all disciplines simultaneously.What this means is that mining technical disciplines work together as a whole, instead of in silos separated by technology and process. mineRP further differentiates itself from competing platforms in two areas:Firstly, mineRP does not store the information gathered from various disciplines as files in a central location, but rather translates and maps that information into SpatialDB, where all information is related to a single version of space. Like working with Google’s Google Earth technology, spatialDash allows browsing of integrated mining technical information through the internet from anywhere across the globe.Secondly, mineRP does not require of mines to change current expert systems employed in the management of their various technical disciplines. Mines may carry on using the geological, design and planning, and even operational systems of their choice, yet centralise information into mineRP through various certified mineRP middleware options. read more

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