Spurs want Zamora – report

first_imgTottenham will table a bid for Fulham striker Bobby Zamora in January, the Evening Standard say.Zamora, who previously had an 18-month spell at White Hart Lane, is reportedly seen as the ideal back-up for Spurs forward Emmanuel Adebayor.It is also suggested that QPR want Roman Pavlyuchenko on loan from Spurs, who are keen to offload him on a permanent basis so are likely to sell him to Locomotiv Moscow.Metro claim Pavlyuchenko is also wanted by Spartak Moscow.Chelsea are willing to sell Fernando Torres for £20m during next month’s transfer window, the Daily Mail reports.The paper says that having considered sending Torres out on loan in order to rebuild his confidence, Chelsea are now prepared to offload him completely.Is Torres’ time at Chelsea almost up?He has scored only three Premier League goals since his £50m move from Liverpool in January.The Telegraph report that Chelsea and Manchester City are set to escape an FA probe into an alleged tunnel bust-up at Stamford Bridge on Monday.The Daily Express say a comment by Ashley Cole towards City boss Roberto Mancini sparked the row.Referring to City’s slump into the Europa League after being eliminated from the Champions League, it is claimed the Chelsea left-back said: “Thursday nights – Channel 5.”Meanwhile, the Daily Star say QPR boss Neil Warnock has launched a bid to sign Manchester City outcast Nigel De Jong on loan for the rest of the season.This page is updated throughout the day. Follow West London Sport on Twitterlast_img read more

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ArcelorMittal SA unveils R9bn BEE deal

first_img12 August 2010Steelmaker ArcelorMittal South Africa has announced a black economic empowerment deal worth over R9-billion that will see a 26% stake in the company being sold to the Ayigobi Consortium and a share trust that represents 8 500 of the company’s employees.In a statement this week, ArcelorMittal says the transaction fulfils key objectives, including moving toward compliance with legislated empowerment equity ownership requirements and positioning the company for future opportunities to achieve improved self sufficiency and growth.“Introducing broad-based BEE shareholders to our operations has been a priority for ArcelorMittal South Africa for some time,” said ArcelorMittal South Africa CEO Nonkululeko Nyembezi-Heita.She said the company started looking at the possibility of an empowerment transaction in 2008, but that the global economic downturn made it impossible to implement a suitable transaction structure at the time. The company resumed its empowerment plans once some normality had returned to the markets.“This is a long term strategic partnership. The Ayigobi Consortium will remain a shareholder for up to 14 years, while the [employee share ownership plan] participants will benefit over a five year period,” she said.Industrial giant, catalyst for growthArcelorMittal South Africa’s new strategic equity partners will be the Ayigobi Consortium, led by Sandile Zungu. Other participants include Mabelindile Luhlabo, Mojalefa Mbete, Pragat Investments, Prudence Mtshali, Phemelo Sehunelo, Zebo Tshetlho, Zico, Oakbay Investments and Mabengela.The remaining 25% of the Ayigobi Consortium will be allocated to women, youth groups and new entrants to the BEE landscape whose composition is still being finalised.“The Ayigobi Consortium is pleased to be given the opportunity to partner ArcelorMittal South Africa. ArcelorMittal South Africa is an industrial giant that remains a catalyst to the realisation of South Africa’s inclusive economic growth and development potential,” said Zungu.“We have the requisite skills, business acumen, commercial experience and strategic networks to assist in making ArcelorMittal South Africa one of the most admired industrial leaders in South Africa and beyond.”New subsidiary createdTo effect the transaction, ArcelorMittal South Africa will transfer all its assets to a new wholly owned subsidiary, ArcelorMittal South Africa Operations (OPCO), in return for 74% of OPCO. The remaining 26% shareholding in OPCO will be 21% held by the Ayigobi Consortium and 5% by the employee share ownership plan.ArcelorMittal South Africa and OPCO will have identical boards of directors, and the Ayigobi Consortium will have the right to appoint one director to the board.“I look forward to welcoming our new partners, including more than 8 500 staff, to our business as shareholders and trust that, together, we will have a mutually beneficial relationship,” said Nyembezi-Heita.ArcelorMittal South Africa, formerly known as the Iron and Steel Corporation (Iscor), is majority owned by the world’s largest steelmaker, Luxembourg-based ArcelorMittal.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Environmental network breakfast program highlights local, national water quality efforts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This month’s breakfast presentation by the Environmental Professionals Network, which includes an optional joint meeting with the Water Management Association of Ohio, will feature three major initiatives aimed at protecting and improving water quality.“The importance of water is increasingly on the public’s mind, which is good, but the challenges are significant,” said David Hanselmann, the network’s coordinator and a lecturer in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.The presentation “will help us learn about new and innovative approaches, relevant in Ohio and beyond,” Hanselmann said.The network is a statewide professional group coordinated by the college’s School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR).The association is an organization for citizens, professionals, agencies and others interested in Ohio’s water resources. It has divisions focused on lakes, floodplains, dam safety, stormwater and watersheds.​’One Water, One Future’The event is from 7:15 a.m. to either 9:45 a.m. or noon March 8 in Ohio State’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive in Columbus. Speaking will be:* Radhika Fox, CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Water Alliance and director of its Value of Water Coalition, on “One Water, One Future: Securing a Sustainable Water Future for All.”The alliance “advances policies and programs that build a sustainable water future for all,” according to its website. The coalition is the group’s education initiative.* Larry Antosch, senior director of program innovation and environmental policy for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, on “Healthy Water Ohio: Strategy for Water Resource Management.”The Healthy Water Ohio initiative “aims to develop a long-range plan that will sustainably meet current and future water needs while enhancing the economy and quality of life for all Ohioans,” its website says.* Susan Ashbrook, assistant director of sustainability for the city of Columbus’s Department of Public Utilities, on “Blueprint Columbus: Clean Streams, Strong Neighborhoods.”The Blueprint Columbus plan aims to eliminate sanitary sewer overflows while creating new local infrastructure jobs and beautifying neighborhoods.​Sign up by March 7Registration for the event is $10 for the network’s portion of the event only, which includes a full breakfast and Fox’s talk and ends at 9:45 a.m.; or $25 for the full combined program, which also includes Antosch’s and Ashbrook’s presentations and ends at noon.Student registration to either option is free and includes breakfast. Registration to both options is open to the public.The deadline to register is noon March 7. Details and a link to register are at go.osu.edu/March2016EPN.For more information, contact Hanselmann at hanselmann.3@osu.edu or 614-247-1908.Sponsoring the event are the Brown and Caldwell engineering consulting firm; Stantec, which provides engineering, consulting and design services; and Ohio State’s Global Water Initiative.The free student registrations and breakfasts are being provided by SENR, the Energy Management and Sustainability program in Ohio State’s Office of Student Life, and the university’s Office of Energy and Environment.last_img read more

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Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: Prevalence & Effects on Couples

first_imgThis post was written by Kimberly Quinn, University of Florida M.Ed./Ed.S. Candidate, 1Lt Florida Army National Guard and Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT, Social Media Specialist.  Both are members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn. By Kimberly Quinn & Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFTIn the last 12 years, the United States military has diagnosed over 103 thousand new cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in deployed service members and over 25 thousand new cases in non-deployed service members [1]. To receive a diagnosis of PTSD, individuals must meet diagnostic criteria inclusive of displaying a certain number of symptoms that cause significant distress and/or disruption.  In addition, there must be some sort of traumatic stressor leading to these symptoms. Full diagnostic criteria for PTSD can be found here. Those that suffer from the effects of trauma without being diagnosed with PTSD are considered to have post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). The intensity of PTSS varies, however, the impact does not reach the severity level of PTSD.  The table below highlights PTSD symptoms included in the new Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-V):American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.Mixon, K. (2013). Kacy Mixon permits eXtension.org to use her personal photo.Spouses and children of service members who deploy can experience secondary traumatic stress (STS)–or significant levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms [2].  This can also be termed vicarious trauma, secondary trauma or secondary post-traumatic stress disorder. These symptoms have negative effects on couple [2] and family functioning.  Specific symptoms of post-traumatic stress [3] that negatively affect couple and family functioning include:Mixon, K. (2013). Kacy Mixon permits eXtension.org to use her personal photoThe good news is that there are steps families can take to prevent the negative effects of PTSD and STS. The following links to resources that can help military families and those that play a supportive role in their lives gain awareness about common stressors, preventative strategies and interventions related to PTSD.Stress Free Kids-Military FamilySecondary Trauma TrainingNational Child Traumatic Stress Network (NTCS)-Military FamiliesNTCS Learning Center References[1] Fischer, H. (2010). U.S. military casualty statistics: Operation New Dawn, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom [2] Melvin, K. C., Gross, D., Hayat, M. J., Jennings, B. M., & Campbell, J. C. (2012). Couple functioning and post‐traumatic stress symptoms in US army couples: The role of resilience. Research in Nursing & Health, 35(2), 164-177. [3] American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.last_img read more

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Homemade VFX: Create and Film a DIY Meteor Strike

first_imgComputer-generated visual effects are useful, but they aren’t perfect for every shot. Learn how models and good cinematography can create great visuals.With a decent camera, some elbow grease, and ingenuity, you can create a wonderful photographic illusion. Take my word for it – I just built my first miniature, and I think the shot works well. Let’s take a look at how you can rely on models and solid filmmaking to get the effects you want — without relying completely on your computer. The inspiration for this occurred to me recently as I was looking through a book by L.B. Abbott called Special Effects – Wire, Tape and Rubber Band Style and saw a couple examples of in-camera effects shots. One was a “glass painting” and the other a “hanging miniature.” These were nifty “trick shot” techniques that filmmakers used prior to the advent of the optical printer. These shots involved creating composites with separate elements in post production.Image: Ted Withers working on a “glass painting.”A glass shot is an outdoor technique using a large pane of glass between the camera and the background — the glass serves as the painter’s “canvas.” Filmmakers align the glass with some topographical element that needs enhancement: a sky replacement, a distant city, or (in this case) an Italian villa.The Germans were especially adept at in-camera effects shots, Fritz Lang’s incredible Metropolis is a monumental photographic achievement. In addition to glass paintings and hanging miniatures, Metropolis made extensive use of the Schüfftan process, a technique that involves a front surface mirror placed at a 45-degree angle to the camera. The mirror reflects a miniature or a painting with an area scraped clean to reveal the live action. Pretty heady stuff for 1927.A hanging miniature is a model suspended between the camera and the background to pull off a big-time illusion without a big-time build. A hanging miniature gives the director more time in the day for the shot because the light and shadow will correspond to the live-action background.I’m building a hybrid hanging miniature. Instead of hanging it with the pick points out of the camera’s view, I’m mounting the lightweight miniature on a blue rod I can key out.The blue patches on the face of the miniature will allow the real roof to “print through” and help the blend. You’ll need to shoot the shot without the model first. You will use this clean shot later to fill in the blue patches and replace the mounting rod.My loadout for this project: LUMIX GH4, 25mm lens, f 14, ISO 800 = 96fpsI needed less than fifty dollars of craft supplies to construct this 1/16th scale (3/4″ to 12″) miniature.In the old days, this model would have hung from thin wires or adhered to a large pane of glass.Adding patina to the miniature. Finessing the miniature so that it blends with the background can be the most important and time-consuming part of the entire process.Here’s the finished product after three test shots and many rounds of supplemental degradation of the miniature. It started to look pretty good after the failed fire test almost destroyed the model.Mark Vargo, ASC started his career in VFX, with his first credit going to The Empire Strikes Back. He joined the team at ILM to work on the films Raiders of the Lost Ark, Dragonslayer, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, and Return of the Jedi. He continued working in VFX, earning an Oscar nomination for his work on Ghostbusters.In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he shifted focus to working as a director of photography, leading the Second Unit on films like The Green Mile, The Patriot, 3:10 to Yuma, and Rise of the Planet of the Apes.last_img read more

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Kalyan Singh faces flak over remarks backing Modi

first_imgRajasthan Governor Kalyan Singh on Monday found himself in the middle of a controversy after his remarks supporting Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s return to power in the Lok Sabha election came to light through a video footage. The video purportedly showed Mr. Singh telling reporters that the nation and society needed Mr. Modi to become the PM again.“All of us are BJP workers. We genuinely want the BJP to win. We want that Modiji should become the Prime Minister… It is necessary for the nation and society that Modiji becomes the PM again,” Mr. Singh said in the video shot in his hometown Aligarh last week.Mr. Singh, a former two-time Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, apparently made the remarks in the midst of a protest staged by some BJP workers outside his house against the party ticket for the Lok Sabha polls being given to sitting MP Satish Gautam.Non-partisan positionMr. Singh’s remarks drew criticism from various quarters, with leaders reminding him that a Governor should be non-partisan and should maintain distance from party politics.Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot said Mr. Singh’s statements did not suit the dignity of the post he was holding. “We have utmost respect for Kalyan Singhji… He is holding a [high] Constitutional post. It is expected of the Governors to be non-partisan,” he said.Rajasthan Pradesh Congress president and Deputy CM Sachin Pilot described Mr. Singh’s remarks as violating the dignity of his Constitutional office. He said it was unfortunate that Mr. Singh had described himself as a BJP worker.Mr. Singh quit the BJP in 1999 and rejoined the party in 2004. The 87-year-old BJP leader was appointed Rajasthan Governor in 2014 after Prime Minister Narendra Modi came to power at the Centre.last_img read more

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Court questions Assam’s jumbo transport to Gujarat

first_imgThe Gauhati High Court on Monday asked Assam’s Chief Wildlife Warden Ranjana Gupta whether she had taken note of a 2016 Supreme Court order against transfer of elephants while clearing the transit of four juvenile elephants to Gujarat for a religious event.Hearing separate petitions filed by Kerala-born Canadian Sangita Iyer and Guwahati-based NGO Avinava Prayash, a division Bench comprising acting Chief Justice Arup Kumar Goswami and Justice Manish Choudhury sought clarification from the Centre with regard to the operation of the apex court’s interim order in 2016 prohibiting transfer of elephants outside a State by their possessors.The Bench also asked Ms. Gupta to clarify whether she had taken note of the Supreme Court’s interim order when she authorised on June 12 the transit of the elephants to Ahmedabad’s Jagannath Temple for a Rath Yatra on July 4.The oldest of the four elephants — females Joytara and Rani, and males Babulal and Rupsing — is nine years old. ‘Will not survive trip’Wildlife activists had argued that these juvenile elephants would not survive the heatwave while travelling in a metal railway wagon 3,106 km from eastern Assam’s Tinsukia to Ahmedabad.Noting that the railways too had sought clarification on the Supreme Court’s interim order before transporting the elephants, the Bench referred to the March 8 letter of the Project Elephant Division of the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change seeking legal steps for the “welfare of the captive elephants, etc., and strict monitoring” to prevent illegal transport of elephants between States.The petitioners’ counsel Bhaskar Dev Konwar, argued that the elephants would face adverse climatic conditions during their train journey to Gujarat.He also pointed out that unlike Tamil Nadu and Kerala, Assam has not framed rules for management and maintenance of captive elephants under Section 64(2) of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. He also contended that none of the elephants sent outside Assam on temporary leases have returned till date. The case is scheduled to come up for hearing again on Tuesday.last_img read more

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Oracle Faces Scrutiny over 13 Billion Verdict Against SAP

first_imgA U.S. appeals court appeared skeptical on Tuesday about reinstating a $1.3 billion jury verdict won by Oracle Corp against SAP, in a case where the European software company admitted massive copyright infringement.At a court hearing on Tuesday, two 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges also suggested Oracle may deserve more than the roughly $300 million it had been assigned by a lower court.A Northern California jury awarded Oracle $1.3 billion in 2010 over accusations that SAP AG subsidiary, TomorrowNow, wrongfully downloaded millions of Oracle files. SAP had acquired TomorrowNow as part of a strategy to provide software support to Oracle customers at lower rates than what Oracle charged, and eventually convince some of those companies to become SAP customers.The trial between the two enterprise software competitors was widely watched at the time, as top Oracle executives Larry Ellison and Safra Catz testified. However, U.S. District Judge Phyllis Hamilton in Oakland, California ruled that Oracle had proven actual damages of only $272 million.Oracle has asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse that ruling.At a court hearing on Tuesday before a three-judge 9th Circuit panel, Oracle attorney Kathleen Sullivan said internal SAP documents showed SAP had expected about $900 million in new revenue by using TomorrowNow to poach Oracle customers. That, and other evidence, was sufficient for the jury to arrive at its $1.3 billion figure, Sullivan argued.However, 9th Circuit Judge Susan Graber questioned whether those SAP revenue figures were objective evidence of the value of the copyrighted material.”It’s hypothetical revenue information, which is not the same,” Graber said.”These may be pie in the sky dreaming,” Judge William Fletcher added.The judges did not issue a formal ruling from the bench. SAP eventually shuttered TomorrowNow, which pleaded guilty to criminal copyright infringement and other charges.SAP admitted liability for the downloads just prior to the 2010 trial, so the only issue in dispute was how much SAP would pay Oracle in damages. Oracle said that figure should be calculated based on what SAP would have paid Oracle had it licensed the materials, instead of downloading them without permission. Oracle estimated that amount in the billions.In her lower court ruling, however, Hamilton decided Oracle is only entitled to profits it had lost as a result of the downloads, as well as any profits SAP gained. The judge calculated that amount at $272 million.At the 9th Circuit hearing on Tuesday, Graber said $272 million “seems low,” and Fletcher said it “seems to me wrong.”SAP attorney Tharan “Greg” Lanier defended the amount, though he acknowledged that Oracle presented evidence at trial that the profits calculation could come to $487 million.The case in the 9th Circuit is Oracle Corp et al. vs. SAP AG et al., 12-16944.last_img read more

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Oil searchers discover and record deepsea graveyard off Angola coast

first_img © 2014 Phys.org A team of researchers looking for oil and gas deposits beneath the seafloor off the western coast of southern Africa has found four large “fish-falls” on the seabed: the carcasses of one whale shark and three mobulid rays. Finding vertebrate carcasses on the seafloor is quite rare, ocean scientists Nicholas Higgs, Andrew Gates and Daniel Jones report in their paper on the discovery published in PLoS ONE—the “graveyard” offers a unique opportunity to learn more about how the death of large sea creatures and the food they provide to other smaller creatures impacts marine life in general. Still images showing each of the observed carcasses. A Whale shark (Rhincodon typus); B Mobulid carcass 1; C Mobulid carcass 2; D Mobulid Carcass 3. Images have been enhanced. Credit: PLoS ONE, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096016.g002 Citation: Oil searchers discover and record deep-sea graveyard off Angola coast (2014, May 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-oil-searchers-deep-sea-graveyard-angola.html Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species To date, just nine vertebrate carcasses have ever been found and studied on the deep ocean floor—this recent discovery pushes that number to thirteen. Such carcass remains are categorized by “fall” type. These four were all fish falls, other’s such as whale falls generally attract more attention.Recorded along with the carcasses were scavengers that had arrived at the scene to feast on the large creatures’ remains. The researchers note that quite often the first to arrive at a fall of any sort are sharks, though they rarely consume what has been found. Next to find the carcasses are usually crabs and amphipods and at some point osedax that feed on the bones. In the footage the researchers were able to see large numbers of fish surrounding the carcasses, the majority of which were eel pouts, which don’t eat carcass remains, but instead feed on other fish that do. The researchers noted that no evidence of osedax were present which suggested that the carcasses hadn’t been on the sea floor very long, perhaps just a month or two. Explore further Journal information: PLoS ONE More information: Higgs ND, Gates AR, Jones DOB (2014) Fish Food in the Deep Sea: Revisiting the Role of Large Food-Falls. PLoS ONE 9(5): e96016. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096016AbstractThe carcasses of large pelagic vertebrates that sink to the seafloor represent a bounty of food to the deep-sea benthos, but natural food-falls have been rarely observed. Here were report on the first observations of three large ‘fish-falls’ on the deep-sea floor: a whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and three mobulid rays (genus Mobula). These observations come from industrial remotely operated vehicle video surveys of the seafloor on the Angola continental margin. The carcasses supported moderate communities of scavenging fish (up to 50 individuals per carcass), mostly from the family Zoarcidae, which appeared to be resident on or around the remains. Based on a global dataset of scavenging rates, we estimate that the elasmobranch carcasses provided food for mobile scavengers over extended time periods from weeks to months. No evidence of whale-fall type communities was observed on or around the carcasses, with the exception of putative sulphide-oxidising bacterial mats that outlined one of the mobulid carcasses. Using best estimates of carcass mass, we calculate that the carcasses reported here represent an average supply of carbon to the local seafloor of 0.4 mg m−2d−1, equivalent to ~4% of the normal particulate organic carbon flux. Rapid flux of high-quality labile organic carbon in fish carcasses increases the transfer efficiency of the biological pump of carbon from the surface oceans to the deep sea. We postulate that these food-falls are the result of a local concentration of large marine vertebrates, linked to the high surface primary productivity in the study area. Because fall finds are so rare, researchers have resorted to dropping dead animals into the ocean and then studying what happens—finding four such natural carcasses is unprecedented, leading to questions as to why so many of the animals died seemingly at the same time. The researchers suggest the graveyard may not be as rare as the finding would suggest, as its possible many exist but have simply not been found—the ocean floor is a vast expanse after all, and the chances of happening upon a fall while studying any given section of sea floor would be slim. Despite that, many must exist as many sharks, rays, whales, exist in the sea and they all must die at some point. Scientists estimate that as much as 4 percent of food in the ocean comes from falls—the rest is in the form of marine snow. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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