Dortmund boss Sancho is something special

first_imgBorussia Dortmund manager Lucien Favre expects Jadon Sancho to get even better given his incredible progressThe 18-year-old winger has enjoyed a stellar breakthrough campaign at Dortmund this season and made his England debut over the recent international break.Sancho’s impressive displays at Signal Iduna Park earned him a new long-term contract at Dortmund last month.Speaking ahead of their Bundesliga game with VFL Wolfsburg on Saturday, Favre hailed Sancho and his special achievements.“Of course he has a lot of potential. He’s only 18, and he’s already playing with the England national team,” said Favre, according to Daily Mail.borussia dortmund, marco reus, jadon sancho, paco alcacerReport: Dortmund hammer four past Leverkusen George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund put four past Bayer Leverkusen.Borussia Dortmund leapfrogged Bayern Munich to claim second place in the Bundesliga. After handing out a 4-0 thrashing of…“At the age of 18, that’s something special, you don’t see it very often.“Of course he can still improve a lot, that’s quite normal and he knows that. But he’s already very good.”He added: “He knows that he still has to improve. He just has to keep working hard, keep working calmly, and needs to have a lot of fun.”Sancho has scored five goals and provided eight assists in 14 games across all competitions this season.last_img read more

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The Secret to Digital Growth Investing in Content

first_imgWhile we’re definitely in the “aggregation” or “curation” age, many online startups are investing in staff and resources for creating original content (which is more than can be said for many of their peers coming from traditional media). Blodget acknowledges the knocks against HuffPo’s content (paying a few big name writers while plucking content from low-or-unpaid bloggers and generating SEO-bait) but he also says that with HuffPo expected to grow another $20 million to $50 million in revenue that it “will likely hire a lot more New York Times staffers to go with the ones it has already got. In other words, HuffPo will keep getting better.” Blodget doesn’t reveal what he’s paying to generate content, but says “We didn’t make that profit because we’re a sweatshop, by the way.” He claims a 25-person newsroom, (which is larger than many magazines which are generating far more than $4 million and splitting four or five people—if they’re lucky—across print AND digital). He writes,“Our newsroom salaries for full-time employees, for example (which include bonuses and benefits) are now higher than at many companies in the traditional news industry. Because the digital news business is quite different from the traditional news business, we often promote from within, and we’ve had the huge pleasure of watching folks who joined us as interns grow up to take leadership positions. True, we can’t yet toss around the $300,000-$500,000 a year per brand-name columnist that Huffington Post and Daily Beast are now reportedly tossing around. But, in future years, if we keep doing what we think we can do, we should be able to pay our top people a lot more than we do today.”But what’s the cost of growing and getting better? According to Google Analytics, Business Insider has seen a steady rise in traffic, generating nearly 8 million uniques in February (comScore has it at 3.5 million—Blodget says he will address the discrepancy). Meanwhile, financial blogger Felix Salmon estimates that expenses have been growing at the same rate as Business Insider’s audience (spending between 23 cents and 36 cents per unique visitor), and points out that Business Insider has moved away from producing premium content for Wall Street “elites,” after realizing that there’s “no money in micro-publishing.”Many traditional publishers—overleveraged and struggling to meet covenants or lose it all—can’t invest in content (or real lead gen or real marketing services, etc.) But for the rest—many of which are seeing improvements in print and boasting solid margins even through the worst of the downturn, and who HAVE proven there is money in micro-publishing—continuing to operate on a shoestring across all media (even as they consider a metered model) will leave them wondering why business is going to a digital startup. At FOLIO:, we’re used to having to cajole publishers to share metrics to back up the case they’re making for their own success.  Kudos then to Henry Blodget (pictured right), CEO of financial news and analysis site Business Insider, who shared the type of proprietary financials that keep most PR heads up at night in a blog about the viability of “digital news” as a business. (The admissions come on the heels of Huffington Post’s $315 million sale—or as one talkbacker to Blodget’s post wrote, “The headline on this post should be: Dear AOL, For your consideration, we’re an excellent Web property too!”) The stats: Business Insider generated $4.8 million in revenue in 2010 (up from $39,495 a couple years ago), mostly from advertising. The company was profitable in 2010 (making $2,127), but Blodget warns it will dip back into the red over the next few quarters, due to aggressive investment, spurred in part by New York State’s capital tax. “Making $2,127 feels about 2,127 times as good as losing money,” he writes. The Costs Of Making Online Content a Real Businesslast_img read more

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Ukraine closes border to Russian males

first_imgUkrainian soldiers drive APCs near Urzuf, south coast of Azov sea, eastern Ukraine on 29 November. Photo: APUkrainian officials on Friday barred Russian males between the ages of 16 and 60 from traveling to the country in the latest escalation of tensions between the neighbours.The long-simmering conflict bubbled over Sunday when Russian border guards rammed into and opened fired on three Ukrainian vessels near the Crimean Peninsula, which Moscow annexed in 2014. The vessels were trying to pass through the Kerch Strait on their way to the Sea of Azov. The Russians then captured the ships and their 24-member crew.The Ukrainian parliament on Monday adopted the president’s motion to impose martial law in the country for 30 days in the wake of the standoff.Petro Tsygykal, chief of the Ukrainian Border Guard Service, announced at a security meeting on Friday that all Russian males between 16 and 60 will be barred from traveling to the country while martial law is in place.President Petro Poroshenko told the meeting that the measures are taken “in order to prevent the Russian Federation from forming private armies” on Ukrainian soil.The announcement follows Thursday’s decision by U.S. President Donald Trump to scrap the much-anticipated meeting with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. Trump said it isn’t appropriate for him to meet with Putin since Russia hasn’t released the Ukrainian seamen.Russian government-appointed ombudswoman for Crimea told Russian news agencies that all the seamen have been transported from a detention centre in Crimea. The three commanders have been taken to Moscow, she said. It wasn’t immediately clear where the other 21 have been taken.A Crimea court earlier this week ruled to keep the Ukrainian seamen behind bars for two months pending the investigation.There has been growing hostility between Ukraine and Russia since Moscow’s annexation of the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine in 2014. Russia has also supported separatists in Ukraine’s east with clandestine dispatches of troops and weapons. Fighting there has killed at least 10,000 people since 2014 but eased somewhat after a 2015 truce.last_img read more

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From shy student to IS polemicist

first_imgAs a shy, studious teenager in Alabama, Hoda Muthana rarely made waves. After her abrupt transformation into a fiery supporter of Islamic State extremists, she is under the scanner of the top levels of the US government.The 24-year-old, who has since been married to three different jihadist men and has a toddler son, says she regrets her turn to radicalism and wants to return home — but President Donald Trump has personally intervened to block her.Growing up in Hoover, Alabama, a prosperous suburb of Birmingham with a sizable Muslim community, Muthana was raised by strict Yemeni immigrant parents who forbade her from owning a smartphone — ubiquitous among US teenagers — until she finished high school.The phone opened her world. Muthana says she was pulled in by messages of the Islamic State group which brainwashed her into flying furtively in 2014 to the militants’ self-styled caliphate, which then reigned over vast stretches of Syria and Iraq and had drawn in hundreds of Westerners, mostly Europeans of immigrant upbringing.Once she arrived, social media gave the Alabama girl a global audience among jihadists. In one tweet, she appeared to torch her US passport. In another, she called Americans “cowards” for not coming in greater numbers to the caliphate’s de facto capital of Raqa, Syria where she lived among Australians.In a message preserved by George Washington University’s Program on Extremism, Muthana hailed the deadly 2015 attack on Charlie Hebdo, the French newspaper that satirized the Prophet Mohammed, writing “Hats off to the mujs in Paris” and urging similar attacks.Detained by US-allied Kurdish fighters in Syria as the Islamic State’s territory dwindles to its last sliver, Muthana said she no longer believes in the extremist ideology.”It’s not Islamic at all. Anyone that says so, I will fight against it,” she told ABC News, speaking in a soft, flat voice and sporting a blue veil.”I’m just a normal human being who has been manipulated once and hopefully never again,” she said.New world on smartphoneJordan LaPorta, who attended Hoover High School with Muthana from 2009 to 2013, said he saw her nearly every day as they took advanced classes together.”We were courteous, and she was a nice, quiet young woman,” he told AFP.”No one, myself included, had any idea that this radicalism was festering when the original story broke in 2015. People far closer to her than I were stunned by the news,” he said.LaPorta, now a student at the University of Alabama Law School, said that Muthana later threatened him for comments he made after her turn to radicalism, by tagging him on Instagram, calling him a “nerd” and saying he “deserved a neck” — a threat he reported to the FBI.Muthana’s father gave her a smartphone when she graduated from high school and enrolled at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.She “really found a place of belonging on her phone, online,” said Hassan Shibly, a lawyer for the family.Islamic State recruiters “preyed upon her” and “gave her so much attention and played with her mind and they cut her off from her friends, from her family, from her community, from her mosque,” Shibly said.Father feels AmericanIn a highly unusual move, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that Muthana is not a US citizen, even though she traveled to Syria on a US passport.”This is a woman who inflicted enormous risk on American soldiers, on American citizens. She is a terrorist. She’s not coming back,” Pompeo told the Fox Business Network on Thursday.The US Constitution’s 14th Amendment, ratified in 1868 after the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, grants citizenship to everyone born in the country — with the exception of children of diplomats, as they are not under the jurisdiction of the United States.Muthana’s father, Ahmed Ali, served at the Yemeni mission at the United Nations. He filed a lawsuit Thursday seeking to affirm his daughter’s citizenship, saying he had left his diplomatic post several months before her birth.In a 2015 interview with BuzzFeed News when his daughter’s case came to light, he voiced sorrow.”America is my country now,” he said. “My kids’ country. And if for me as an American citizen, if asked to me to defend this country, I will defend it.”LaPorta, her classmate, said that Hoover residents in a private Facebook group overwhelmingly said they did not want her back. He said she should return but face charges.”As for me, I do have some degree of sympathy. Young people make mistakes, and she has a young child not implicated in any of this due to any fault of his own,” he said.”But fleeing the country to join a terrorist organization is not an act of mere youthful indiscretion. Actions have consequences.”last_img read more

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