10 months agoLiverpool boss Klopp: Home cheer for Leicester a shock!

first_imgLiverpool boss Klopp: Home cheer for Leicester a shock!by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp admits home fans celebrating Manchester City’s defeat to Leicester City took him by surprise.Klopp joked that he thought that the Anfield fans’ wild reactions to Leicester City’s goal against Manchester City were for his Liverpool side’s win over Newcastle United.He said, “No, I thought it was because of us! I’m really naive, I thought that is really nice, thank you very much!”Then now I heard after the game it was about another result!“Obviously nobody told our crowd that Tottenham won 5-0.”It is fine, atmosphere for Boxing Day, people coming from all over, around the world to watch, the atmosphere was really good and exceptional in that moment. But I thought it was because of us.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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3 hours agoGenk striker Samatta: Facing Liverpool a dream come true

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Genk striker Samatta: Facing Liverpool a dream come trueby Paul Vegas3 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveRacingGenk striker Mbwana Ally Samatta admits facing Liverpool was a “dream come true”.Liverpool were comfortable 4-1 winners for Wednesday night’s Champions League encounter.And Tanzania international Samatta said: “As a child I was not a fan of Liverpool, but of the arch rival: Manchester United. “I’m not going to say that I get goose bumps, but it’s so special. “A game like this and to be allowed to play is like a dream, the dream of every boy watching football on television.” last_img read more

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Upgraded ESP Centre to Reach More Children with Disabilities

first_imgStory Highlights The $86-million centre, located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, was constructed by the Government through financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Chief Technical Director in the Ministry, Dione Jennings, said the expansion of the centre is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to protect persons with disabilities and promote their rights. Director of the Early Stimulation Programme (ESP), Antonica Gunter-Gayle, could hardly contain her joy at the recent opening of the programme’s upgraded facility for special needs children. Director of the Early Stimulation Programme (ESP), Antonica Gunter-Gayle, could hardly contain her joy at the recent opening of the programme’s upgraded facility for special needs children.“I feel great, I am excited; the staff is overcome. It is a good feeling,” she says.The $86-million centre, located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, was constructed by the Government through financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).It has a clinic, three assessment rooms with bathrooms, cubicles for early-childhood practitioners, sensory room and speech therapy room, and other units.Mrs. Gunter-Gayle said the upgraded centre will enable the ESP to improve assessment and intervention services for children with disabilities.“Our children with disabilities are children first, and I am really happy about this building,” she said.“We are giving them the opportunity to be the best that they can be to reach their highest potential,” she added.Operating under the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, the ESP caters to the developmental needs of children with disabilities up to six years, and currently provides early stimulation and interventions for more than 1,500 children across the island.Portfolio Minister, Hon. Shahine Robinson, said with the upgrading of the facility, the ESP is equipped to do more for its clientele, as it is now positioned to engage a wider corps of specialised professionals, including developmental psychologists, speech therapists, and occupational therapists.Over the long term, she says, the intention is to establish regional centres to provide early intervention services, which, she said, “will help to reduce the institutionalisation of young children with developmental disabilities across the island”.Senior Social Protection Specialist with the IDB, Donna Harris, commends the Government and its partners for “embarking on this important journey for the benefit of our children with disability. This wonderful structure represents the future of many of our kids”.Chief Technical Director in the Ministry, Dione Jennings, said the expansion of the centre is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to protect persons with disabilities and promote their rights.She says the Government is committed to promoting social protection and respect of all human beings, breaking down barriers of discrimination and building bridges of inclusion.She points out that approximately 60 per cent of ESP beneficiaries are on the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), and have limited access to intervention services.Mrs. Jennings says measures aimed at promoting and protecting the rights of persons in situations of vulnerability will continue and “we are assured that the staff and beneficiaries of this facility will be even more energised in their commitment”.Omar Francis, who is the Assistant to Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, says the upgrading of the centre is a welcome development.Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson (left), interacts with children at the upgraded Early Stimulation Programme (ESP) facility located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, at the recent official opening. Looking on is Omar Francis, who is the Assistant to Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton.“Early intervention for disadvantaged kids has been proven to have dramatic long-term effects. When incorporated with early-childhood education, nutrition and health, the lasting effects are invaluable,” he states.He says studies have shown that children who receive early treatment are at significantly lower risk for serious cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as stroke and diabetes.“These findings demonstrate the great potential of coordinated birth to age five early-childhood programmes to prevent chronic disease, reduce healthcare costs and produce a flourishing society,” Mr. Francis points out.Opposition Spokesperson on Labour and Social Security, Dr. Fenton Ferguson, also welcomes the development, describing it as a “worthy response to our children with disabilities”.Technical management for the project was provided by the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF).The assessment centre is part of a Government of Jamaica Integrated Social Protection and Labour Programme, aimed at improving human capital and labour market outcomes for the poor by enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of key social protection programmes.Since 1975, the ESP has been serving the special needs community, and has reached some 30,000 children through various intervention services.In addition to assessment of children with disabilities, the ESP provides rehabilitative therapy, community-based intervention services within homes, schools, health centres, and day-care facilities, as well as counselling support for families and caregivers of special needs children.last_img read more

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NDTVs Ravish Kumar wins Magsaysay

first_imgManila: Indian journalist Ravish Kumar on Friday was awarded this year’s Ramon Magsaysay Award, regarded as the Asian version of the Nobel Prize. Kumar, 44, who is NDTV India’s senior executive editor is one of India’s most influential TV journalists, the award citation said. He is among five individuals who were declared winners of the award. “Kumar’s “Prime Time” programme deals with “real-life, under-reported problems of ordinary people”, it added. “If you have become the voice of the people, you are a journalist,” the citation added. The four other winners of the 2019 Ramon Magsaysay Award are Ko Swe Win from Myanmar, Angkhana Neelapaijit from Thailand, Raymundo Pujante Cayabyab from Philippines and Kim Jong-Ki from South Korea. Established in 1957, the Ramon Magsaysay Award is Asia’s highest honour.last_img read more

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Trump issues new executive order to combat terrorism

first_imgWashington: US President Donald Trump has issued a new executive order that would enhance the country’s ability to target terrorists and those who finance their activities, as well as identify, sanction and deter perpetrators of terrorism worldwide. Utilising the new order, issued on the eve of the 9/11 anniversary on Tuesday, the Treasury sanctioned over two dozen individuals and entities from 11 terrorist groups, including Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US It allows the US government to better target terror group leaders and provides new tools to pursue individuals who participate in terrorist training, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said. The executive order also authorises secondary sanctions on foreign financial institutions that have knowingly conducted or facilitated significant transactions with sanctioned persons, Mnuchin said. He added that the order targets those actors for and behalf of specially-designated global terrorists. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls “Specifically, we have leaders, operative and financiers from over 11 terrorist organisations, including Iran’s Quds Forces, Hamas, ISIS, Al Qaeda, and their affiliates,” Mnuchin told White House reporters at a joint news conference with the Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. “The government has taken more action than we ever have before,” the treasury secretary said, asserting that his department was enhancing efforts to deny terrorist access to the financial system. Pompeo, meanwhile, described the executive order as the “most-significant update” to counterterrorism sanctions authority since September 2001. According to Pompeo, the new order amends the previous one by adding clauses that allow the departments of state and treasury to directly target leaders of terrorist groups and their associated entities without having to tie terrorist leaders to specific acts. “Second, it is more effectively and efficiently targets individuals and entities who participate in terrorist training and provides new authorities to impose sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly do business with terrorists,” the secretary of state said. “As these actions show, today’s executive order by President Trump adds further muscle to the US counterterrorism efforts,” Pompeo said. “It will help us to ensure that the deadly attacks of September 11 that occurred 18 years ago this week are never repeated on American soil. Never.”last_img read more

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Truth and Reconciliation Commission becomes muse for Royal Winnipeg Ballet

first_imgAPTN National NewsTaking inspiration from the stories and emotions of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Canada’s Royal Winnipeg ballet has developed a story around the commission’s work. Aboriginal creative talent and artistry combined with a traditional ballet to create a work that honours the national and historical significance of the commission.APTN’s Ntawnis Piapot has more.last_img

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Economic recovery in oil provinces helps lower national vacancy rate CMHC

first_imgThe economic recovery in Western Canadian oil-producing provinces contributed to the first decrease in the national apartment vacancy rate in three years, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation said Tuesday.In its 2017 Rental Market Report, the federal agency said the vacancy rate for purpose-built rentals in Canadian cities with at least 10,000 people fell to three per cent in October, down from 3.7 per cent a year earlier.That returns the national vacancy rate to its 10-year average after a two-year spike.“We’re finding that demand is strong for rental in Canada, including in some of the oil-producing sectors that were not performing as well over the last couple of years,” said Gustavo Durango, senior market analyst at CMHC.In a sign that Alberta continues to adapt to the 2014 oil price shock, the province had Canada’s third-largest growth in occupied rentals after Ontario and Quebec.Michael Markidis of Desjardins Capital Markets said it’s a sign that “the bleeding has stopped in most of the major markets located in oil-producing provinces.”Alberta’s vacancy rate fell to 7.5 per cent in October from 8.1 per cent a year earlier, led by Lethbridge which was down 3.4 percentage points to 5.1 per cent.“It still has a high vacancy rate relative to Alberta’s history but it’s off the peak that we saw the last couple of years,” said Durango.Nationally, demand outpaced supply. The number of rental apartments increased by 1.2 per cent or 23,000 in the last year, about half the growth rate noted last year.Demand was helped by high levels of international migration, improving employment for young adults and the ongoing aging of the population.High home purchase prices also kept younger households in the rental market longer as they saved for down payments, said Durango. That’s particularly a factor in high-price markets like Vancouver and Toronto, where rental vacancy rates are very low.Despite low vacancy rates in Ontario and B.C. there is adequate access to rental housing in some form in almost all centres, said Canadian Federation of Apartment Associations president John Dickie.Between 22 and 38 per cent of all condos in Ontario and the West are rented and a “secondary market” of basements, suites and other units make up more than 40 per cent of total rental supply.“The secondary market provides a flexible housing supply, which is often lower priced than the primary market,” he said in a news release.Associations chairman David Hutniak called on the federal government to examine tax policy for rental buildings, while provinces and cities need to look hard at their development charges and planning approval delays.“Those are the factors holding back much-needed, purpose-built rental supply,” he stated.Vacancy rates were lowest in the B.C. cities of Kelowna and Abbotsford-Mission at 0.2 per cent and highest in Saskatoon at 9.6 per cent.Metropolitan Vancouver was at 0.9 per cent, Toronto one per cent, Montreal 2.8 per cent, Ottawa 1.7 per cent, Edmonton seven per cent and St. John’s 7.2 per cent.The average national monthly rent for a two-bedroom rental apartment rose 2.8 per cent to $989, outpacing inflation of around two per cent.Rent increases were greatest in Kelowna at 8.6 per cent and fell by 1.3 per cent in Saskatoon and Edmonton.Average monthly rents for two-bedroom apartments were highest in Vancouver at $1,552, Toronto $1,404 and Calgary $1,247. They were lowest in Trois-Rivieres,Que., at $594.The average vacancy rate for condominium rentals declined to 1.6 per cent from 1.9 per cent a year earlier.Average two-bedroom condo rentals were highest in Toronto at $2,000 and lowest in London, Ont., at $996.last_img read more

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Barrick Gold to take US429million charge on PascuaLama project

first_imgTORONTO – Barrick Gold Corp. says it expects to take a US$429-million charge following an order by the Chilean government to close all surface facilities at its troubled Pascua-Lama project high in the Andes mountains.The gold miner says it is reclassifying Pascua-Lama’s 14 million ounces of proven and probable gold reserves, which are based on an open pit mine plan, as measured and indicated resources.Barrick is studying the potential of developing Pascua-Lama as an underground mining operation, rather than an open pit.It says the change would address a number of concerns by reducing the overall environmental impacts.The project, which straddles the Chile-Argentina border, has been criticized for threatening water supplies and glaciers.Barrick says it will provide a further update on the Pascua-Lama project at the company’s investor day on Feb. 22.Companies in this story: (TSX:ABX)last_img read more

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BC to probe money laundering red flags in real estate horse racing

first_imgVICTORIA – Two government reviews will dig deeper into possible money laundering in British Columbia, expanding the province’s scrutiny beyond casinos.The reviews are aimed at stopping the possibility of money laundering in other sectors of the province’s economy, which were cited in a June report by former RCMP deputy commissioner Peter German, who concluded the practice was happening in the provincial gaming industry.“We can’t ignore that red flag,” Attorney General David Eby said Thursday. “We won’t ignore it.”Finance Minister Carole James said: “It’s important for us as government to say we aren’t going to accept that illegal activity.”The reviews will focus on the possibility of money laundering in real estate, horse racing, luxury vehicles and the financial services sector, Eby said.The first review is being done by the Ministry of Finance into real estate and financial services sectors. German will conduct the second review, which will focus on identifying the scale and scope of illicit activity in the real estate market, as well as whether money laundering is linked to horse racing and the sale of luxury vehicles.There is widespread concern about B.C.’s reputation as a haven for money laundering, said Eby.German’s original report said B.C.’s gaming industry and the system intended to combat money laundering were not prepared for an onslaught of illegal cash flowing through the casinos and they failed collectively. He estimated more than $100 million was funnelled through casinos.Eby said he is concerned that money launderers could possibly move their activities to other sectors of the B.C. economy now that much of the movement of large amounts of cash at casinos has been halted.“It’s essentially a game of whack-a-mole, I’ve said before, with money launderers,” he said.Eby said the new reviews, due in March, will follow German’s concerns about sectors beyond gaming while the Finance Ministry will look to identify and close regulatory gaps that could be used by money launderers.Maureen Maloney, a former deputy attorney general, was appointed chairwoman of an expert panel on money laundering in real estate, said James.“It really is an opportunity to do specific cases, to follow the money and to look at where the gaps are and to look at the system and closing those gaps,” she said.last_img read more

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Chinas music streaming leader Tencent to go public in US

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – The owner of China’s largest music streaming services is looking to strike it rich in the U.S. stock market.Tencent Music Entertainment plans to sell its stock in the U.S. as part of an initial public offering. The IPO documents filed Tuesday propose raising $1 billion, but that preliminary figure often ends up being substantially higher.Investor demand is likely to be high, given the rising popularity of music streaming and Tencent’s success so far.Tencent says its services have more than 800 million users, including 23.3 million subscribers who pay to listen to its music library.It’s also profitable, having earned $199 million on revenue of $1.66 billion last year.Tencent’s major shareholders include the leading music streaming service Spotify, which went public earlier this year.last_img read more

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Player of the Year not the right award for Turner

Evan Turner will not win the Naismith Player of the Year award.The college basketball award is not equivalent to the NBA Most Valuable Player award, which is why Ohio State’s junior guard will not win.There is no doubt that Turner would be on a short list for an MVP award. That can be supported by Ohio State’s record during his injury absence compared to when he’s been on the floor.However, he is not the best player in the nation. He can’t go onto a court and dominate the game regardless of what opposing defenses do to try to stop him, like other players around the country can.Turner cannot do what Kentucky guard John Wall can do with the ball by manipulating defenses to his liking to score or dish it to a teammate.Turner cannot do what Connecticut guard Jerome Dyson can do by scoring every way possible against the then-No.1  ranked team in the country, Texas.Even Notre Dame center Luke Harangody has a case to make with his 24.7 points per game, good for second in the nation.Yes, Turner is the best in the Big Ten, with the only competition coming from Michigan State guard Kalin Lucas and Purdue forward Robbie Hummel. Also, Turner should get a lot of recognition for his talent and his importance to OSU, who fell from the Top 25 without him. He will be an All-American at the very least and will most likely garner other accolades as well.For those who believe Turner should get the Player of the Year award as if it were based solely on a player’s value to his team, I have one name for you: Wayne Chism.The senior forward from Tennessee has not endured more pain than Turner, but his team endured a bigger loss than the Buckeyes.When OSU lost Turner, it lost its best player for a few games and anticipated his comeback so it could make the NCAA Tournament.In Tennessee, the team lost four of its players, including Tyler Smith, because of an off-the-court incident that involved their arrest. Soon after, the team indefinitely suspended those players.Chism picked up right where Smith left off and became the leader of the Volunteers, who went on to beat No.1 Kansas and No. 23 Mississippi since their dismissal.Therefore, the main case Turner had for winning the Naismith Award instead favors Chism. There is a lot of basketball yet to play and this could all change, but the fact is that the Naismith Award is for the Player of the Year, not the Most Valuable Player. read more

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Baseball Noah West out for season with knee injury

Ohio State junior Noah West (8) runs towards third base as he scores the first run of the game against the Lipscomb Bison on March 15, 2019 at Bill Davis Stadium. Credit: Sal Marandino | For The LanternOhio State junior shortstop Noah West will be sidelined with a season-ending knee injury, head coach Greg Beals announced Thursday. West had been a late scratch from Tuesday’s lineup against Northern Kentucky.“He is going to have surgery next week, and we’ve got to adjust our infield defense accordingly,” Beals said. The adjustment, according to Beals, will be to move freshman third baseman Zach Dezenzo over to shortstop, which is where he played Thursday. This will open up the door for freshman infielder Nick Erwin and freshman infielder Marcus Ernst to receive playing time at third base. West was hitting .284 on the season with 9 RBIs. read more

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Homer Man Arrested For Entering Home And Assaulting Residents With Bear Spray

first_imgThe Alaska State Troopers responded to the incident at an address on Stovall Ave in Anchor Point, and arrested Roy Burke, 40, of Homer. Burke also took items from inside the house and fled the scene in a vehicle.  Further investigation by Troopers showed Burke was on conditions of release from another criminal case. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A Homer man was arrested for entering a residence without permission and assaulting several people inside the residence with bear spray, on May 8. According to the Troopers Burke had entered the residence without permission and assaulted several people inside the residence with bear spray. According to an online Trooper dispatch, an arrest warrant was issued for Burke.  Burke was contacted and arrested later the same night and transported to Wildwood Pretrial facility.last_img read more

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SC clears way for Khaledas Gatco graft case trial

first_imgBNP Chairperson Khaleda ZiaThe Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for a lower court to continue trial proceedings of the Gatco graft case against BNP Chairperson Khaleda Zia, reports news agency UNB.The three-member bench of Appellate Division led by Chief Justice Surendra Kumar Sinha dismissed a leave to appeal filed by Khaleda.The Supreme Court concluded the hearing of the appeal on Sunday.Earlier, on 10 May 2016, BNP Chairperson Khaleda Zia filed an appeal with the Supreme Court against the High Court order that rejected her two petitions challenging the legality of the Gatco graft case and its inclusion under the Emergency Powers Act.On 5 August 2015, the HC rejected the two writ petitions.On 2 September 2007, the ACC filed the Gatco graft case against Khaleda, her younger son Arafat Rahman Koko, Jamaat-e-Islami Ameer Motiur Rahman Nizami and 10 others for causing a loss of Tk 145.64 crore to the national exchequer by allegedly awarding the contract of container handling at the Chittagong port and the Dhaka’s Inland Container Depot to Gatco.Khaleda on 27 September, 2007 filed a petition with the HC challenging the legality of the inclusion of the case under the Emergency Powers Act and seeking a stay order on the trial proceedings.In 2008, an HC bench issued a rule and stayed the trial proceedings after hearing the petition of the BNP chief.In the same year, the proceedings of the graft case were stayed again as Khaleda filed another petition challenging the legality of the case.last_img read more

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For Texas DACA Recipients Court Ruling Is A Small Win — But

first_imgLexey SwallTomas Martinez, with GLAHR, a grass roots organization from Atlanta, chants to excite the crowd in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 18, 2016.Like many other immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, Carolina Ramirez celebrated this week after a federal judge moved to temporarily preserve a program that protects immigrants like her.But the Houston resident and her allies were cautious with their joy. The fight for the program remains on Capitol Hill, Ramirez said. “I just need Congress to get things together,” she said. “They just need to really hold the line and make sure the deportations don’t continue to happen.”Ramirez, 28, has called Texas home for 20 years. She’s a recipient of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The program, which awards its recipients with renewable, two-year work permits and deportation reprieves, has been targeted for elimination under the administration of President Donald Trump. But those plans were at least paused thanks to a nationwide preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Tuesday.Alsup ordered the program to remain in place during a lawsuit filed by the state of California that argues that the current administration failed to follow the law when Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the announcement to rescind DACA on Sep. 5.“[The injunction] shows the courts agree with protecting immigrant youth,” Ramirez said. “DACA is more than a paper to me.”There are nearly 690,000 recipients in the United States. More than 120,000 live in Texas, meaning the program is especially important for the state. Ramirez stressed that the court’s decision was a temporary solution, rather than a permanent one for DACA recipients. The real fight, she said, will be in Washington, where members of Congress need to “feel the pressure” to make a deal before the Jan. 19 deadline for a government funding bill.On Tuesday, Trump met with Democratic and Republican lawmakers to discuss the future of DACA, and said he wanted a “clean bill” to protect DACA recipients. Later, he added he still wanted an overhaul of immigration policy, which includes his much-desired border wall. Leaders of both parties agreed they’d like to reach a deal that protects undocumented childhood arrivals and strengthens border security. A bipartisan bill “will provide a discreet solution to the crisis that Trump created when he ended DACA on Sept. 5th,” said Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center.“The communities want it, the majority of Americans want it — even legislators on both sides of the aisle have said that they want it and they understand and recognize it needs to get done in January. Congress has a real solution in front of them.”Adrian Reyna, DREAM Act campaign director of the national advocacy group United We Dream, is also a DACA recipient. Reyna said he received a call from his sister Wednesday morning. She asked him if everything was fixed because of the injunction.Unfortunately, he said, it wasn’t. There was still work left to do.“The devil is in the details — of course not everything is fixed,” he said. Meanwhile, Raymund Paredes, Texas commissioner of higher education, told reporters in a phone call Wednesday morning that DACA remains a critical issue for students in the state.“We have tens of thousands of students who fit in the DACA category,” Paredes said. “The United States is their country. A lot of these kids, these young people, don’t remember living anywhere else.”In June, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, along with officials from nine other states, wrote a letter to the Trump administration urging officials to end the DACA program.Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn told reporters Wednesday morning that the federal injunction wouldn’t impact the bipartisan negotiations. Still, he said Tuesday’s court decision was wrong.“If President Obama can create the deferred action program, then certainly President Trump can un-create it, or end it. It just makes sense,” Cornyn said, according to The Hill.Ramirez will be watching closely. She said the past several months have brought a surge in young people coming together to help save DACA. Her personal fight won’t stop because of the recent ruling.“I’ve been able to dedicated my time fully to the future of my community,” Ramirez said. “I feel a lot of energy and a lot of love for my community.” Disclosure: Raymund Paredes has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune. A complete list of Tribune donors and sponsors can be viewed here.  Sharelast_img read more

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Police Officers Wounded Monday Are Stable HPD Releases Name Of Suspects

first_imgFlorian Martin/Houston Public MediaDr. Michelle McNutt, chief of trauma at Memorial Hermann’s Red Duke Trauma Institute (fourth from left) and Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo (first from right) held a media briefing on January 29, 2019, to provide an update on the five police officers who were injured while serving a search warrant on January 28 in Southeast Houston.HPD Chief Art Acevedo released the names of the two persons involved in a Monday shooting with police officers in Southeast Houston and the hospital that is treating the wounded officers provided an update on their condition.Dr. Michelle McNutt, chief of trauma at Memorial Hermann’s Red Duke Trauma Institute, said she could only provide information about three of the five officers that were treated because of patient privacy guidelines and family wishes. She noted those three officers are stable.McNutt detailed that one of the officers suffered a gunshot wound to the face. He was operated on Monday night and will have to undergo additional operations by the hospital’s facial trauma.Another officer who also suffered a face wound and who, according to Acevedo is a 50-year-old sergeant and a 25 year veteran with HPD, won’t require surgery and will likely be discharged Tuesday.A third officer who sustained a knee injury has already undergone surgery by the orthopedic trauma team and will likely be discharged later this week. The HPD chief said he is a 50-year-old sergeant and a 27 year veteran.Another wounded officer is a 33-year-old who, according to Acevedo, sustained a sustained a shoulder gunshot wound and was released from the hospital Monday night.The fifth officer who was wounded in the shooting, specifically on his neck, is still in the hospital and, according to HPD, is in serious but stable condition.Florian Martin/Houston Public MediaThe Pecan Park house where four police officers were shot on January 28, 2019 while serving a search warrant.Acevedo said he is not releasing the names of the wounded officers because of security concerns.The HPD chief explained how the shooting occurred when a group of officers were serving a search warrant at the 7800 block of Harding Street, in Southeast Houston. According to Acevedo, the officers immediately came under fire upon entering the house.Additionally, a pitbull dog attacked them and was killed. Subsequently, a male suspect came from the back of the house and opened fire. An officer was hit on one of his shoulders and went down falling on a sofa in the living room.At that time, a female suspect went towards the fallen officer reaching over him and trying to get his shotgun and that’s when back up officers made entry and discharged their firearms striking the female suspect, after which an exchange of gunfire continued. Both suspects died in the shooting.Florian Martin/Houston Public MediaDennis Tuttle, 59 years-old, is one of the suspects involved in a January 29, 2019, shooting with HPD officers that occurred in Southeast Houston. He died during the confrontation.Acevedo said the male suspect was 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle and the female suspect was 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas. The HPD chief detailed they were both white.Florian Martin/Houston Public MediaRhogena Nicholas, 58 years-old, is one of the suspects involved in a January 29, 2019, shooting with HPD officers that occurred in Southeast Houston. She died during the confrontation.Investigators found marijuana in the house, along with a “white powdery substance” that Acevedo said could be cocaine or fentanyl. Additionally, several firearms were recovered: two 12-gauge shotguns; a 20-gauge shotgun; a 22 caliber rifle and a Remington 700 rifle.As is customary in officer-involved shooting incidents in the city limits, the incident is being investigated by the HPD Special Investigations Unit, HPD Internal Affairs Division and the Harris County District Attorney’s Office.Mayor Sylvester Turner visited the officers at the hospital Tuesday morning. In a tweet, he praised their bravery and said that one of them had switched careers and had found his calling at HPD, which comes to show the commitment to public service that policemen have.Community tip critical to investigationAcevedo said it was a neighbor’s tip that directed narcotics officers to the house in Pecan Park.He said his thin-stretched department can only do so much to fight crime, which is why a good relationship with local communities — including the immigrant community — is crucial.“We rely on them,” he said. “They’re witnesses, they’re complainants, and we rely on them. And I think thanks to those efforts, those outreach efforts in Spanish and in other languages, our community trusts us.”Acevedo said HPD has worked hard to assure immigrant communities that officers won’t ask about their citizenship status.You can watch chief Acevedo’s media briefing here:Chief @artacevedo gives update @memorialhermann hospital on injured officers https://t.co/G6KlXx42Bw— Houston Police (@houstonpolice) January 29, 2019 Sharelast_img read more

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Oil searchers discover and record deepsea graveyard off Angola coast

first_img © 2014 Phys.org A team of researchers looking for oil and gas deposits beneath the seafloor off the western coast of southern Africa has found four large “fish-falls” on the seabed: the carcasses of one whale shark and three mobulid rays. Finding vertebrate carcasses on the seafloor is quite rare, ocean scientists Nicholas Higgs, Andrew Gates and Daniel Jones report in their paper on the discovery published in PLoS ONE—the “graveyard” offers a unique opportunity to learn more about how the death of large sea creatures and the food they provide to other smaller creatures impacts marine life in general. Still images showing each of the observed carcasses. A Whale shark (Rhincodon typus); B Mobulid carcass 1; C Mobulid carcass 2; D Mobulid Carcass 3. Images have been enhanced. Credit: PLoS ONE, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096016.g002 Citation: Oil searchers discover and record deep-sea graveyard off Angola coast (2014, May 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-oil-searchers-deep-sea-graveyard-angola.html Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species To date, just nine vertebrate carcasses have ever been found and studied on the deep ocean floor—this recent discovery pushes that number to thirteen. Such carcass remains are categorized by “fall” type. These four were all fish falls, other’s such as whale falls generally attract more attention.Recorded along with the carcasses were scavengers that had arrived at the scene to feast on the large creatures’ remains. The researchers note that quite often the first to arrive at a fall of any sort are sharks, though they rarely consume what has been found. Next to find the carcasses are usually crabs and amphipods and at some point osedax that feed on the bones. In the footage the researchers were able to see large numbers of fish surrounding the carcasses, the majority of which were eel pouts, which don’t eat carcass remains, but instead feed on other fish that do. The researchers noted that no evidence of osedax were present which suggested that the carcasses hadn’t been on the sea floor very long, perhaps just a month or two. Explore further Journal information: PLoS ONE More information: Higgs ND, Gates AR, Jones DOB (2014) Fish Food in the Deep Sea: Revisiting the Role of Large Food-Falls. PLoS ONE 9(5): e96016. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096016AbstractThe carcasses of large pelagic vertebrates that sink to the seafloor represent a bounty of food to the deep-sea benthos, but natural food-falls have been rarely observed. Here were report on the first observations of three large ‘fish-falls’ on the deep-sea floor: a whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and three mobulid rays (genus Mobula). These observations come from industrial remotely operated vehicle video surveys of the seafloor on the Angola continental margin. The carcasses supported moderate communities of scavenging fish (up to 50 individuals per carcass), mostly from the family Zoarcidae, which appeared to be resident on or around the remains. Based on a global dataset of scavenging rates, we estimate that the elasmobranch carcasses provided food for mobile scavengers over extended time periods from weeks to months. No evidence of whale-fall type communities was observed on or around the carcasses, with the exception of putative sulphide-oxidising bacterial mats that outlined one of the mobulid carcasses. Using best estimates of carcass mass, we calculate that the carcasses reported here represent an average supply of carbon to the local seafloor of 0.4 mg m−2d−1, equivalent to ~4% of the normal particulate organic carbon flux. Rapid flux of high-quality labile organic carbon in fish carcasses increases the transfer efficiency of the biological pump of carbon from the surface oceans to the deep sea. We postulate that these food-falls are the result of a local concentration of large marine vertebrates, linked to the high surface primary productivity in the study area. Because fall finds are so rare, researchers have resorted to dropping dead animals into the ocean and then studying what happens—finding four such natural carcasses is unprecedented, leading to questions as to why so many of the animals died seemingly at the same time. The researchers suggest the graveyard may not be as rare as the finding would suggest, as its possible many exist but have simply not been found—the ocean floor is a vast expanse after all, and the chances of happening upon a fall while studying any given section of sea floor would be slim. Despite that, many must exist as many sharks, rays, whales, exist in the sea and they all must die at some point. Scientists estimate that as much as 4 percent of food in the ocean comes from falls—the rest is in the form of marine snow. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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