Vancouver USA Pride event attracts families

first_imgFor Vancouver mother Anjela Ford-Glueckert, Vancouver USA Pride is about two families.There’s hers — the four generations of women and children who sat in the shade at Esther Short Park on Saturday, eating pretzels and listening to music.Then there’s the one around her — the rainbow-clad crowd of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender people and their allies who milled in the park as they visited friends and checked out the booths.This is Ford-Glueckert’s fourth Vancouver USA Pride event, where she was joined by her 7-year-old son, Jalen, her 4-year-old daughter, Billie Kat, her mother, Renate Ford, 69, and her grandmother, Ilse Kahle, 89.She brought her family — absent her wife, who was at a meeting and could not attend this year — for the visibility, she said, and to see the LGBT community out celebrating.“There’s more people, a more diverse crowd, a lot more families,” Ford-Glueckert said of the event compared to years past. “There are folks outside of the rainbow community here, and that’s better.”last_img read more

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Bradford Jrs death Questions Remain in Alabama Mall Shooting

first_imgBy KIM CHANDLER, Associated PressHOOVER, Ala. (AP) — The father of a Black man killed by a police officer during a shooting at an Alabama mall said his son had a permit to carry a gun for self-defense, adding it was hurtful police initially portrayed his son as the shooter.Emantic “EJ” Bradford Jr., 21, was fatally shot by the officer responding to the Thanksgiving night shooting that wounded an 18-year-old man and a 12-year-old girl bystander. Hoover police initially said they thought Bradford, who was carrying a handgun, was responsible but later retracted that statement. They subsequently said it was unlikely that Bradford had done the shooting.Protestors carry a sign reading “Justice for E.J.” during a protest at the Riverchase Galleria in Hoover, Ala., Saturday, Nov. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Kim Chandler)Bradford’s father, Emantic Bradford Sr., speaking Saturday night with The Associated Press, said the family wants to know if there is police body camera footage from the shooting. Police have not confirmed to AP whether such footage exists.Hoover Police Captain Gregg Rector said investigators now believe that more than two people were involved in the initial fight ahead of the shooting, and that “at least one gunman” is still at large who could be responsible. Police said while Bradford Jr. “may have been involved in some aspect of the altercation, he likely did not fire the rounds that wounded the 18-year-old victim.”Rector said police regret that their initial statement about Bradford was not accurate and added the shooting remains under investigation.About 200 demonstrators marched Saturday evening through the Riverchase Galleria mall in suburban Birmingham and held a moment of silence for Bradford at the spot where he was killed.The slain man’s stepmother, Cynthia Bradford, described her stepson, who went by E.J., as a respectful young man whose father worked at a jail for the Birmingham Police Department. She also said of the initial police account: “We knew that was false.”The unanswered questions surrounding the shooting have stirred emotions in the suburb of the majority-Black city of Birmingham.Demonstrators on Saturday included several relatives, and they chanted “E.J” and “no justice, no peace” as they marched past Christmas shoppers at the mall.Family members described their horror of finding out from social media that Bradford was dead.Video circulated on social media of Bradford lying in a pool of blood on the mall floor.Bradford’s father called his son, “a good kid, a very good kid.”Bradford Sr. said his son had a permit to carry a weapon in self-defense. He said he doesn’t know exactly what happened at the mall but added: “They were so quick to rush to judgment. … I knew my son didn’t do that. People rushed to judgment. They shouldn’t have done that.”Carlos Chaverst, an activist in Birmingham who organized Saturday’s protest, said that when authorities acknowledged that the person killed was not the actual shooter, “that sent us in an uproar.”He said more protests will be held in the future to hold officials accountable.“When we found out about this incident, there were questions from the jump. People were upset because a man was shot and killed by police in our own backyard,” he said.The incident began Thanksgiving night with a fight and shooting at the Riverchase Galleria, a mall crowded with Black Friday bargain hunters, according to authorities. An 18-year-old man was shot twice and a 12-year-old female bystander was shot in the back. Hoover police said Friday morning that the girl was in stable condition.The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency is investigating the incident since it is an officer-involved shooting. The Hoover Police Department is conducting its own internal investigation.The officer who shot Bradford was placed on administrative leave while authorities investigate the shooting. The officer’s name was not released publicly. The officer was not hurt.Video posted on social media by shoppers showed a chaotic scene as shoppers fled.A witness, Lexi Joiner, told Al.com she was shopping with her mother when the gunfire started.Joiner said she heard six or seven shots and was ordered, along with some other shoppers, into a supply closet for cover.“It was terrifying,” Joiner said.___Associated Press writer Chevel Johnson in New Orleans contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Lower Your Card Processing Fees

first_img Ever feel that credit card processing fees are taking an exceptionally large bite out of your profits? You may be right, says Bob Carr, CEO of Heartland Payment Systems, a card processing company based in Princeton, New Jersey. “Transaction costs have increased to the point where some merchants are paying as much as 3 percent of the total sale,” says Carr, who recommends five steps to manage processing and reduce the costs of credit card processing.1.Understand your bill. Know what services you are getting and how much you are paying for each one. “Most [business owners] don’t know this is something you can negotiate once you understand the billing,” says Carr.2.Scout out surcharges. At a minimum, processing fees involve the credit card company, the bank that issued the card and the processing company. “There can be up to 10 middlemen between the merchant and their money,” says Carr. “Ask your processing company, ‘Who am I paying, and what are they doing for me?'”3.Know your numbers. Fees differ by card type, so learn which ones your customers use most often, and negotiate processing accordingly. “Merchants [can] get quoted a lowball rate on one category, such as debit cards, and pay a much higher rate on others,” Carr explains.4.Buy, don’t rent. Processing equipment suitable for small businesses can be purchased outright for $300, yet many merchants fall prey to leases priced at $40 to $50 per month or more.5.Shop around. Says Carr, “The best way to buy is the way the big guys buy: talking to multiple companies and negotiating the lowest possible price.”Jennifer Pelletis a freelance writer specializing in business and finance. October 1, 2006 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. This story appears in the October 2006 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more

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Introducing Coconut for making functional programming in Python simpler

first_imgAdding to the list of Python-like programming languages is Coconut that allows developers write simple and elegant functional code, while using the familiar Python environment and libraries. It is basically a superset of Python that adds on top of Python syntax and is inspired by programming languages like Haskell, CoffeeScript, F#, and patterns.py. The language is written by Evan Hubinger, an undergraduate student studying mathematics and computer science at Harvey Mudd College. Why Coconut was developed? Writing functional programs in Python can be challenging at times. While Python does allow developers to write high-order functions, it lacks concise syntax for lambdas, boilerplate-less pattern matching, etc. One Hacker News user mentioned, “It’s capable of functional programming in the sense that functions are first class values that you can pass around, but it is infamously hostile to functional programming. For example, Python still doesn’t have multiline lambdas, and the justifications for why always boil down to it being “unpythonic”.” This is what Coconut tries to solve by bringing tools of modern functional programming. It provides a clean -> operator replacing Python’s lambda statements. It supports pipeline-style programming, partial application, pattern-matching, destructuring assignment, parallel programming, and more. To provide optional static type-checking you can integrate Coconut with MyPy, which is an optional static type checker for Python. But, it is not purely functional that allows programmers to choose whatever programming style they are comfortable with. As it is a variant of Python, developers who have experience in working on Python will not have much difficulty in learning it. Coconut code are compiled to Python code. Developers can access the Coconut compiler through its command-line utility, which also comes with an interpreter to enable real-time compilation. Additionally, it also supports the use of IPython/Jupyter notebooks. What are the Python version it supports? It supports these Python versions: >= 2.6 on the 2.x branch or >= 3.2 on the 3.x branch. To make Coconut built-ins universal across Python versions, it automatically overwrites Python 2 built-ins with their Python 3 counterparts. It also overwrites some Python 3 built-ins for optimization and enhancement purposes. If developers want to access the original Python versions of any overwritten built-ins, they can retrieve the old built-in by prefixing them with py_. Read Next pandas will drop support for Python 2 this month with pandas 0.24 Qt for Python 5.12 released with PySide2, Qt GUI and more Google researchers introduce JAX: A TensorFlow-like framework for generating high-performance code from Python and NumPy machine learning programslast_img read more

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