Colombia motivated by England disrespect warns Woodward

first_img0Shares0000Gareth Southgate has established a link between his players and the English public claims 2003 Rugby World Cup winning coach Clive Woodward but he worries believing facing Colombia in the last 16 was an easier half of the draw could backfire. © AFP / ODD ANDERSENLONDON, United Kingdom, Jul 2 – England manager Gareth Southgate has risked ratcheting up World Cup last 16 opponents Colombia’s motivation by fielding a B team in their last group game believing that would earn them an easier route to the final, warns England’s 2003 Rugby World Cup winning coach Clive Woodward.England earned the right to play the Colombians on Tuesday after a 1-0 loss to Belgium last Thursday to finish runners-up in their group. Woodward takes issue with the selection policy of Southgate — although his Belgian counterpart Roberto Martinez also made sweeping changes — but is more staggered by another facet of the thinking behind the policy.“The thing I am really struggling with, though, is a much bigger point,” he wrote in the Daily Mail on Monday.“England have hardly covered themselves in glory in tournaments over the last two decades yet they were wasting time and energy and getting distracted thinking about possible quarter-finals and semi-finals.“Don’t even go there, just win the next match and the next after that.”Woodward drew on his experience of a tough first knockout stage match in the 2003 World Cup with Wales, after taking their pedal off the gas for their final two pool matches, to illustrate to Southgate the perils of tinkering with winning line-ups and taking the sharpness off the first team players.“Who on earth ever thought that somehow Colombia would be the easy route, one of the best attacking teams in world football and a side who reached the Olympic quarter-finals?”“Nobody qualifying for the World Cup last 16 gets lucky.“The one team who will be relishing all this is Colombia —- what greater motivation than an England team believing playing them is an easier way to glory!– ‘zero chance’ –“I would love to be in charge of the Colombia team this week, reminding my players how England don’t respect them. The England players will know this too.”Woodward, said there is no need to play players as Southgate did against Belgium to sew unity within the squad.“I have been amazed how former players used unity in the squad as a reason for Southgate’s selection -— well, if this is what creates unity, we have zero chance,” said Wodoward.“Unity is simply everyone doing everything that is required of them to win the next match even if that is just carrying the water bottle.”England coach Gareth Southgate has built ‘a genuine connection with the country’ – Woodward © AFP / PAUL ELLISOn the plus side, though, Woodward says Southgate has got his patriotic juices flowing like no previous England football manager.“This is the World Cup knockout stages and, despite Belgium, I haven’t been so excited about an England manager and his group of players for a long time,” said Woodward.“They have built a genuine connection with the country and the opportunity of a lifetime is still there.“But there is no hiding place, this is when champion teams find a way of winning. I can’t wait.”Only Woodward and the late Alf Ramsey who managed England to 1966 World Cup success, have delivered a global trophy for the country that introduced the rest of the world to cricket, rugby and football.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Raiders vs. Ravens: 3 things to watch

first_imgDerek Carr’s quest to ruin the Raiders’ chances at the No. 1 pick continues in Baltimore on Sunday, but one of the league’s stiffest defenses stands in his way.The Ravens only allow 300 total yards per game, fewest in the NFL, and their 205.4 passing yards surrendered per game rank second.Baltimore snapped a three-game losing streak with a three-point win over the Bengals last Sunday in rookie quarterback Lamar Jackson’s starting debut, and he’ll get the go again on Sunday against the …last_img read more

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Clutter Created You

first_imgOOL without designing intelligence is a fOOL’s errand. Watch smart chemists act like intellectually-fOOLfilled atheists.Scientific materialism has one ironclad rule: No mind. No God. No supernatural intervention. Stuff happens all by itself. Thus restricted, materialists who may know a lot about chemistry may exhibit utter lack of logic. Professing themselves to be wise, they have become fOOLs.Drawing by Brett Miller for CEH.Take Keith Cooper’s headline from Astrobiology Magazine: “Cleaning up the clutter: how proto-biology arose from the prebiotic clutter.” First, the protagonist in the story has to dispense with designing intelligence.Just like the mythical creation stories that depict the formation of the world as the story of order from chaos, the early Earth was home to a chaotic clutter of organic molecules from which, somehow, more complex biological structures such as RNA and DNA emerged.There was no guiding hand to dictate how the molecules within that prebiotic clutter should interact to form life. Yet, had those molecules just interacted randomly then, in all likelihood, that they would never have chanced upon the right interactions to ultimately lead to life.“The question is, out of all the random possibilities, are there any rules that govern these interactions?” asks Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, an organic chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in California.Notice several things. First, the people responsible for this story dismiss any “guiding hand” from square one. That’s an argument by assertion that merely reconfirms their commitment to atheism. Second, they know that the current orderly world could not have emerged by randomness (thus the need for “rules that govern” mindless molecules. They have their work cut out for them. No mind; no guidance; just laws of nature (rules).Could the complex molecules required for life emerge spontaneously by chance? Credit: Illustra Media, Origin.These rules would be selective, inevitably leading to the right interactions for assembling life’s building blocks. To unlock the secrets of these rules and how the prebiotic clutter transitioned to the biologically ordered world of life, Krishnamurthy utilizes a discipline called “systems chemistry,” and published a paper concerning the topic in the journal Accounts of Chemical Research that explores this relatively new way of understanding how life came from non-life.Nobel prize-winner and geneticist Jack Szostak of Harvard Medical School describes systems chemistry as: “one of the news ways of thinking about the problems of prebiotic chemistry.” To understand how systems chemistry works, think of a flask full of chemical A, to which another chemical, B, is added and which reacts with A to produce two more chemicals, C and D. Since no process is 100 percent efficient, the flask now contains chemicals A, B, C and D. “So now you have a system,” explains Krishnamurthy. Systems chemistry considers the system as a whole and explores the rules within that system that govern how each chemical interacts with the others, and in different conditions.All we have been told so far as that clutter added to clutter creates a system. Tell that to your teenager. He can justify his messy room by calling it a system, and start a new science of Systems Clutter to explain that he is doing ‘research’ on the origin of order from chaos.Szostak and RK are aware of the enormous improbability of useful molecules coming together by chance (see clip “The Amoeba’s Journey” from the Illustra Media film Origin). He calls systems chemistry a way of thinking. “It’s a matter of thinking about what chemicals or conditions are likely to be available and likely to be helpful.” Thought experiments have been productive sometimes in science, but experimentation is the acid test.Of course, unravelling the chemistry of the prebiotic clutter is a far cry from explaining the interactions of four chemicals in a flask. The computing and analytical power required to simulate such a complex system was beyond reach just a decade or two ago. Instead, the majority of research into the origin of life previously had focused on individual classes of biomolecules, the most promising being RNA (ribonucleic acid).Further reading shows major problems with the “RNA World” hypothesis these days, in spite of decades of hype about the insight it had provided. Krishnamurthry (lets call him RK) knocks Miller’s spark-discharge icon while he’s at it.The RNA world has, however, come in for much criticism lately, which Krishnamurthy believes is deserved. RNA is able to transfer genetic information in organisms and is made of chains of ribonucleotides. But there’s a catch.“Nucleotides don’t just pop up from chemical mixtures, they have to be made in a very defined manner,” he says. “There has to be a certain order to the reaction sequence. It’s not like Stanley Miller’s spark discharge experiment where he put all these gases together, pressed a switch and ‘Voila!‘”Young Stanley Miller with his iconic spark-discharge experiment.Miller, we recall, only could say ‘Voila!‘ about tiny amounts of four amino acids, all mixed-handed (see the Illustra Media film Origin). Amino acids are not rare. Life uses only twenty types, all left-handed, out of hundreds of amino acids. RNA and DNA are much more complicated molecules. Their formation goes against the natural laws of chemistry. Szostak, a leading past proponent of the RNA World hypothesis, knows that.Although Szostak agrees that systems chemistry has the power to support the RNA world theory, or at least explain the origin of RNA, he points out that a disproportionate amount of work has been put into understanding how nucleotides form, and not enough into what happens after that. “There are still missing steps in understanding how RNA could be made,” he says. So, the challenge now for systems chemistry is to show how and why each of these stages occur.“Just synthesizing a monomer of RNA like a nucleoside or a nucleotide isn’t enough to say you’ve found the origin of RNA,” says Krishnamurthy. “How do you put those monomers together in a meaningful manner that is self-sustainable?”Graphics here and at bottom by Brett Miller. Used by permission.Further pained reading of this doomed article shows RK struggling to find “selection” in prebiotic chemistry that might lead not to life, but to “proto-biochemistry”. He gives his ordered clutter a mouthful of a term: “homogeneous heterogeneity.” That’s opposed to “heterogeneous heterogeneity” (i.e., disordered clutter). We’re getting smarter every day. “In other words, it is the emergence from the prebiotic clutter of an orderly proto-biochemistry.” Then we learn that progress is all in futureware:There is a long way to go yet and Krishnamurthy recommends that progress will be best made with baby steps as scientists develop this bottom-up approach to the origin of life from the heterogeneous prebiotic clutter. By discovering reactions and catalysis that select the right interactions between organic compounds, the aim is to build up our understanding of how the basic building blocks assembled — how, for example, RNA emerged from the chaos.For reasons why materialism is unscientific, see this Illustra film.Baby steps are useless if the baby is blind, deaf, and has nowhere to go. That’s a random walk. You cannot impose a goal on mindless molecules, like Mom coaxing baby toward her loving hands. They’ll just do whatever the laws of chemistry tell them to do. There is no natural selection, either; all OOL storytellers admit that. Optimism is no substitute for experimentation.Ultimately the wish is to build an experimental simulation that includes the entire heterogeneous heterogeneity of the prebiotic clutter in a replica of Earth’s early environment, and then to run that simulation over and over again to see which selective interactions are most common and whether they can repeat the origin of life.“I’m optimistic that we will be able to work out reasonable pathways for making all the building blocks of biology, and for assembling these components into simple, primitive cells,” says Szostak. “However, there is a lot to be learned before we can accomplish this ambitious goal.”Order emerging from chaos: Is this not one of the very creation myths the article began dismissing in the first paragraph?The terms “baby steps” and “building blocks of life” use the power of suggestion to fool the unwary. They give the impression that molecules are striving to become alive. They create visions of progress, crying “Information, information” when there is no information. They are broken cisterns that can hold no water; clouds without rain; wandering stars, for whom the gloom of utter darkness has been reserved forever.These intellectually fOOL-filled atheists are cheaters. They impose their own creative minds and goals on mindless molecules, coaxing them to do what they want. That’s unfair. Let them put all the cluttered molecules into a sealed tank, take their guiding hands off, and come back in a billion years to see what emerges. That would be scientific. Teasing people with the Building Blocks of Lie is not. (Visited 450 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Passivhaus on Spec in Boston

first_imgA step-by-step progress reportThe company has created a construction blog that walks visitors through the process, beginning last September when the building site was an overgrown lot through February when builders were working down their punch list.There are 21 entries in all, at least so far, and although you’ll only get a single photo and a little text at each one, you can see major steps along the way.Some of the technical highlights:A shallow frost-protected slab insulated with 8 inches of expanded polystyrene (EPS) for an R-value of 32. The sides of the footings are insulated with 4 inches of EPS (R-16).Above-grade walls are balloon-framed on the outside, 24 inches on center, with a second framed wall inside of that carrying floor joists for the second story. The walls are connected with gusset plates and spanned by window wells. Exterior walls are insulated with 17 inches of blown-in cellulose (R-59).The truss-framed roof is insulated with 2 feet or more of cellulose for an R-value of 84.Windows are triple-glazed Schuco units with a U-factor of 0.176 and a solar-heat gain coefficient of 0.50.Domestic hot water is provided by a Kingspan FPW30 solar thermal system with a 119-gallon tank.Space heating and cooling are provided by a pair of Mitsubishi Mr. Slim ductless minisplits, each with a capacity of 9,000 BTU/h. A Zehnder Comfoair 350 heat-recovery ventilator provides fresh air.Airtightness was measured at 0.33 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals. Placetailor used Siga Wigluv tape to seal the sheathing seams and Siga Corvum tapes to reduce air leakage around the window frames.You’ll find many more details at the Rocksberry website, including descriptions of interior finishes and exterior cladding.One neat trick involved the exterior rainscreen. Siding on much of the house runs vertically, so Placetailor looked for rainscreen furring that would allow air to circulate freely (solid material run horizontally would block the flow of air). They settled on a twin-wall PVC product manufactured by Coroplast they could get through a local supplier. The Boston design-build group Placetailor is wrapping up work on a single-family house in the city’s Roxbury district that was built on spec to the Passivhaus standard. The has was sold even before work was completed.The two-story house at 55 Marcella Street has three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, and a total of 1,450 square feet of conditioned space. It’s right around the corner, literally, from a high-performance four-unit townhouse on Highland Street that was completed last year. Placetailor also had a hand in that one.Placetailor strategic director Declan Keefe said the house on Marcella recently sold for $572,500. The house went on the market during rough framing and was under contract before Placetailor had finished plastering the interior.The buyers apparently don’t care whether their new house is officially certified as a Passivhaus, and Keefe says Placetailor is still discussing whether to pursue official certification on its own. The house, which Placetailor calls the “Rocksberry Passive House,” was built on an infill lot right across the street from a small city park and not far from public transportation and bike paths. The price is rightThe property was snapped up quickly, although Keefe says the eventual buyers weren’t shopping specifically for a Passivhaus building. In fact, they hadn’t been aware of the Passivhaus standard.Whether the economy is picking up steam, new single-family homes in the neighborhood are rare, or high-performance homes are more attractive than conventional housing, the Rocksberry House apparently went for an above-average price.Keefe said the house sold for $325 per square foot in an area where anything above $300 per square foot is uncommon. Even the high-performance “E+” units around the corner sold for $269 per square foot.Placetailor already has two additional Passivhaus projects in the works, including a two-family condo, also to be built on spec, and a three-family Passivhaus rental that will be built to another firm’s design.last_img read more

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10 months agoVan Dijk: Liverpool will ask me about De Ligt if we want him

first_imgVan Dijk: Liverpool will ask me about De Ligt if we want himby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool defender Virgil van Dijk admits there’s little talk about Matthijs de Ligt.The Ajax stopper is expected to leave for a major European power, though Van Dijk says there’s been little talk of his Holland teammate at Melwood.He told AD: “It does not work like that. A big club like Liverpool has so many scouts looking around, they will keep an eye on him. “If they want to know something, I’ll hear about it.”Asked how much he would pay for De Ligt, Van Dijk laughed: “Well, less than that for me, hahaha. But Ajax is in a luxurious position. We will see.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Alberta suspends certificate of Calgary trucking company involved in Broncos crash

first_imgHUMBOLDT, Sask. – A Calgary trucking company that owns the semi truck that collided with the Humboldt Broncos bus, killing 15 people, has been ordered to keep its vehicles off the road.A spokesman with Alberta Transportation says Adesh Deol Trucking Ltd. started operating last fall.John Archer says the government suspended the commercial carrier’s safety fitness certificate on Monday.He says the move is standard procedure and the company passed a recent inspection.The Saskatchewan junior hockey team was on its way to a playoff game Friday when the crashed happened north of Tisdale.RCMP have said the truck driver survived the accident.last_img read more

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