J-Palm CEO among 10 Finalists for Africa Netpreneur Prize Initiative

first_imgAmong the 10 finalists is multiple award-winning Liberian entrepreneur, Mahmud Johnson (top, far right), Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of J-Palm.The Africa Netpreneur Prize Initiative (ANPI) has identified the top 10 finalists for its grand finale event taking place in Accra, Ghana on 16 November 2019. According to an ANPI release, the finalists were chosen from nearly 10,000 applicants from 50 African countries. During the grand finale, the ten finalists will compete in a pitch competition to win a share of $1 million USD in grant money.Among the 10 finalists is multiple award-winning Liberian entrepreneur, Mahmud Johnson, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of J-Palm.J-Palm Liberia (JPL) was founded with the goal of making premium consumer goods while creating income-earning and employment opportunities through sustainable palm-oil production. When JPL was first founded, palm oil kernels had been going to waste in Liberia, but founder and CEO Mahmud Johnson found a way to innovate productive uses for this overlooked natural resource. Today, JPL has created a range of beauty and clean-energy products, built a robust network of partnerships across the country, and helped to create jobs for hundreds of Liberians. Mahmud holds a degree in economics from Dartmouth College and is a 2017 recipient of the Order of the Star of Africa conferred by the President of Liberia.After months of judging and deliberation, the finalists were shortlisted and will now go on to pitch their business directly to four finale judges – Jack Ma, Founder of Alibaba Group and the Jack Ma Foundation; Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Executive Chairman of Econet Group; Ibukun Awosika, Chairman of First Bank of Nigeria and Founder/CEO of The Chair Centre Group; and Joe Tsai, Executive Vice Chairman of Alibaba Group – during a televised finale event called “Africa’s Business Heroes”. The winners will receive a share of the $1 million USD grant prize pool.The ANPI is a philanthropic initiative spearheaded by the Jack Ma Foundation aimed at supporting and inspiring the next generation of African entrepreneurs across all sectors, who are building a more sustainable and inclusive economy for the future of the continent. For the next ten years, the ANPI will host the “Africa Business Heroes” show where ten finalists will compete in a pitch competition to win a share of $1 million USD in grant money.The Jack Ma Foundation will host a full-day Africa Netpreneur Summit, an invitation-only conference where African and global entrepreneurs, investors, educators, and leaders will convene to discuss how best to enable entrepreneurship and the digital economy across the continent. Guest speakers at the conference will include Ban Ki-moon, Former UN Secretary General and Co-chair of the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens. The conference will be followed by the “Africa’s Business Heroes” event in the evening.“We launched the Africa Netpreneur Prize Initiative to identify top entrepreneurs from across the continent, not only to reward them but to inspire a whole new generation of potential gamechangers for Africa. I have been inspired by the entrepreneurs I met in Africa, many of whom are dealing with the same challenges we faced when we started Alibaba years ago. I truly believe the potential of Africa’s business heroes is limitless,” said Jack Ma, Founder of Alibaba Group and the Jack Ma Foundation.“Africa’s Business Heroes” will air on November 29. More details of how to tune in to the program will be released in the coming weeks. Highlights from the Africa Netpreneur Summit will also be shared via ANPI social media handles. Follow along on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.The diverse group of 10 finalists represent a range of industries and experience.Waleed Abd El Rahman is CEO of Mumm (Egypt), a virtual cafeteria for businesses, harnessing the power of shared economy through technology, cloud kitchens and an online marketplace for home-based entrepreneurial cooks. Waleed is a seasoned entrepreneur with 12+ years in food tech. He is also the former founding managing director of MIT Technology Review-Middle East and a member of the Advisory Committee of the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers Community.Ayodeji Arikawe is co-founder of Thrive Agric (Nigeria) an agricultural technology-enabled company that works with smallholder farmers to enable them with greater access to finance, as well as improve their income and harvest distribution. Today, Thrive Agric works with 22,000 farmers in Nigeria, but the company is aiming to build the largest network of farmers in Africa. They are on a mission to “build an Africa that feeds the world and Itself.” Ayodeji is an accomplished software engineer and serves as both co-founder and CTO for Thrive Agric.Temie Giwa-Tubosun is the founder and CEO of LifeBank (Nigeria), a medical distribution company that uses data and technology to help health workers discover critical medical products. The company has saved over 5,300 lives in Nigeria. Founder Temie has over 10 years of health-management experience with Department for International Development, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Programme and Lagos State. In 2014, BBC listed her as one of the 100 women changing the world. She was also recognized by Quartz and the World Economic Forum.Kevine Kagirimpundu is co-founder and CEO of UZURI K&Y (Rwanda) an African-inspired ecofriendly shoe brand established in Rwanda. Kevine is the co-founder and CEO of UZURI K&Y, and she is passionate about ending global waste while also leveraging her creativity to create employment opportunities for her community. UZURI has made a direct impact on more than 750 people through employment and skills training. In addition to obtaining her degree in creative design, she has participated in numerous entrepreneurship programs to enhance her skills in business development. In 2017, she was recognized as the winner of the Made in Rwanda Enterprise of the Year.Other finalists include Christelle Kwizera, founder, Water Access Rwanda (Rwanda); Dr. Tosan J. Mogbeyiteren, founder, Black Swan (Nigeria); Chibuzo Opara, co-founder, DrugStoc (Nigeria); Dr. Omar Sakr, founder and CEO, Nawah-Scientific (Egypt) and Moulaye Taboure, co-founder and CEO, Afrikrea (Cote D’Ivoire).Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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“THE SEVEN LAST WORDS OF OUR SAVIOUR ON THE CROSS” IN CONWAL PARISH CHURCH THIS SUNDAY

first_imgDonegal Camerata String Quartet with Revd. Canon Stewart Wright, who will be reading the “Seven Last Words of Christ” during the performance.The Donegal Chamber Music Society continues its Sunday afternoon concert series in Letterkenny this Sunday.The Donegal Camerata will perform Franz Joseph Haydn’s “The Seven Last Words of Our Saviour on the Cross” Op. 51 for string quartet in Conwal Parish Church.In 1786 Haydn was commissioned to compose an orchestral work called The Seven Last Words of Our Saviour On the Cross. The work was designed for a performance at the Good Friday service at the Cádiz Cathedral in Southern Spain. Haydn later adapted it for string quartet in 1787. The piece last about one hour and includes seven slow sections that are meditations on each of the last seven words or phrases spoken by Jesus on the Cross. Haydn also added an Introduction and a final movement called Earthquake. This deeply moving masterpiece is presented by the ensemble as a Lenten preparation for Holy Week.The Donegal Camerata is an international string ensemble of professional players based in the North West. The string quartet consists of Hungarian violinist Orsolya Szabó-Yélamo (first violin), Northern Ireland violinist Claire Cunningham (second violin); Slovakian string player Lucia Spacirova (viola); Spanish musician Víctor Yélamo (cello).“The Seven Last Words of Our Savior on the Cross”, Op. 51 by Franz Joseph Haydn will be performed by the Donegal Camerata String Quartet on 23rd of March in Conwal Parish Church at 3pm. Admission €10/ 5, tickets will be available at the door.  “THE SEVEN LAST WORDS OF OUR SAVIOUR ON THE CROSS” IN CONWAL PARISH CHURCH THIS SUNDAY was last modified: March 20th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Conwal Parish ChurchDonegal Chamber Music Society“THE SEVEN LAST WORDS OF OUR SAVIOUR ON THE CROSS” IN CONWAL PARISH CHURCHlast_img read more

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Designing a Low-Slope Roof That Works

first_imgThe recessed can light conundrumThere is yet another wrinkle to this roofing saga: the use of recessed light fixtures in the ceiling. They would be installed in the drywall that serves as the air barrier. Hoene wonders if that’s going to be a problem.Holladay says, “Absolutely, that’s a problem.”He continues, “You want to minimize all penetrations and electrical boxes in an airtight ceiling, and all penetrations need to be very carefully air sealed. If you care about energy performance, you won’t have any recessed can lights in your ceiling.”Dorsett adds that certain types of recessed lights come with gaskets to make them airtight, and they are rated for contact with insulation. But, he says, they should be inspected and installed carefully.“There are also surface-mount LED fixtures that can be mounted on standard electric boxes that present a far smaller and far shallower penetration into the insulation layer, which may be a better alternative,” Dorsett says. “Any penetration of the ceiling gypsum needs to be detailed for air tightness.” Insulating Low-Slope Residential RoofsHow to Install Rigid Foam On Top of Roof SheathingSpraying Polyurethane Foam Over an Existing RoofQuestions and Answers About Air BarriersBan the CanRethinking Recessed LightingCold-Weather Performance of PolyisocyanurateGreen Basics: Rigid Foam Insulation Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam SheathingHow to Build an Insulated Cathedral CeilingAll About Attic VentingGreen Basics: Attics, Structure, Claddings RELATED ARTICLES Our expert’s opinionHere’s how GBA Technical Director Peter Yost sees Hoene’s situation:Per usual on roofing and attic questions, I like to check in with Brian Knowles at RoofsPlus, a local high-performance roofing company. Here is a summary of my discussion with Brian:Is a 1:12 standing seam roof OK? Yes, but use a full-coverage membrane such as Ice and Water Shield as the roofing underlayment. Also, use a hidden-clip system rather than exposed fasteners, and back up the standing seam lock seam with a high-performance sealant. Brian’s company uses Geocel Tripolymer.Using an EPDM membrane would be OK as well. But, exposed roofing membranes typically don’t fail in the field of the installation, but at joints and laps. These need to be inspected annually. Brian’s company never uses 45-mil membranes but finds the 60-mil performs well. They have never used 90-mil EPDM.For both types of cladding, the devil is in the details at the eaves: With a slope this low, making a watertight seal between either the membrane or the standing seam and the fascia is tricky, particularly if the site has wind exposure. Brian has found that even manufacturers’ recommended eave details are not robust and his company has developed some of their own details.Here is Brian’s cut: “Fully adhered EPDM systems (where there is no curb or parapet termination) need to be stripped in to metal drip edge with cover tape. The published details will show the EPDM fastened under the drip edge metal. They show cover tape over the drip edge and onto the EPDM. This detail leaves the strip of cover tape vulnerable to damage from sliding ice and snow. Our manufacturer trainers have approved a slightly different detail that has a more successful field application in areas where ice and snow are a factor (see Image #3, below). Bear in mind that these edge details will require regular inspection over the years to maintain the bond at the edge. A parapet or curb detail is preferred when using EPDM.”Color matters. In cold climates, white membranes and white metal roofs can be associated with significant night-sky radiation and much cooler attic spaces.On the question of whether to vent the roof assembly: A dedicated space of 1 to 2 inches just underneath or above the structural roof sheathing will vent the assembly. The space created between the structural roof deck and the finished ceiling is an attic space. This space can be vented along any of the margins of the attic but typically with vents at the eaves or sometimes rooftop turbine or “whirlybird” vents. Brian and I agree that the attic (or in this case almost a plenum) space needs to be either completely inside or outside the conditioned space and it needs air flow in either case. But note: If the attic is outside, then it means venting it with outside air; if the attic is inside, then it means introducing inside air flow. (Read on for more details…)In Brian’s experience, even though a 1:12 pitch gives you negligible stack effect air movement or venting, when the roof cladding — particularly a darker one — is exposed to solar gain, that attic space heats up quite a bit and air flow develops even without stack effect from eave to eave or eave to ridge. So, the “high-low” eave vents in the second hand-drawn image will work fine for venting this “outside” attic space. And of course in this case, the finished ceiling plane is where the continuous air and thermal boundaries will be.On the other hand, you could insulate and air seal this roof at the roof line, in which case the attic space created between the roof and the ceiling plane becomes an inside space. It’s important to create air flow for this space, even if it is just passive vents that relieve this space.But note, if you air seal and insulate the finished ceiling plane, then the roof assembly above can dry to the interior. On the other hand, if you insulate and air seal the roof line, and you don’t vent the underside or topside of the structural roof deck, then you’ll have little to no drying potential in either direction. What kind of insulation will work best?Hoene’s original plan was to use 4 inches of XPS, which has a nominal R-rating of 5 per inch. Better take that with a grain of salt, Dorsett says.“Four inches of XPS won’t perform at R-20 for the full 50+ year lifecycle of most metal roofing,” he writes. “As it loses its blowing agent over a handful of decades its performance starts out higher than R-20, but eventually drops to about R-17. The R-5/inch labeling is based on something like a 20-year average performance.“R-17 might be sufficient for dew-point control, but it might not be,” he continues. “If instead you went with 5 inches of EPS [expanded polystyrene], its R-value will be pretty much the same on day 25,000 as on day 1, since its much lighter blowing agent dissipates quickly, and its labeled-R is its fully depleted R.”There are two other choices — polyisocyanurate and spray polyurethane foam.“Another roofer has proposed using 4.4 inches of polyiso insulation above the sheathing for an unvented assembly,” Hoene writes. “This builder said that XPS and EPS aren’t compatible with the EPDM adhesive. Quote from builder: ‘Like pouring gas in a styrofoam cup, it melts it away. They are typically used in ballasted or mechanically attached systems.’“The issue I have with polyiso is that I have read that the effective R-value in cold weather is lower, and polyiso should only be used in warmer climates,” he adds.One solution to polyiso’s less-than-optimum performance in cold weather, Holladay says, comes from building scientist John Straube, who once told him, “One option is to stick with polyiso and just make it thicker. If we do that, let’s call polyiso R-5 per inch.”Either open- or closed-cell polyurethane foam could be sprayed on the underside of the roof sheathing, another possible route to take. Choosing the type of roofingA first step, Holladay suggests, would be finding out whether the type of metal roofing Hoene is considering can be installed on the roof he’s planning. The pitch is very low — rising only 1 inch for every 12 inches of run — and some types of metal roofing need more than that.Hoene has discussed the possibility of using 60-mil EPDM instead, which apparently won’t present any aesthetic issues, but he wonders whether the membrane will perform as well as a standing-seam metal roof.“On low-slope roofs in the snow zone, EPDM will work better than standing-seam metal, since it can’t leak even under high winds, whereas metal roofs will,” writes Dana Dorsett. “With limited slope to drain well, it can take forever to be rid of any leakage moisture. EPDM won’t last as long as metal, but there’s a reason it’s the most common roofing for very low slope roofs.”Kevin Dickson also likes EPDM. It’s “great,” he says, and it’s available in white, which would reduce cooling loads in the house.An alternative, Dickson adds, is spray polyurethane, which will last “indefinitely” if it’s well maintained, meaning that it should be recoated every 10 years or so, and inspected carefully every year.In further conversations with a roofer familiar with low-slope assemblies, Hoene is told that a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM roof applied over 1/2-inch DensDeck Roof Boards is the best option.“Is the 90-mil thickness overkill?” he asks. “Most of the applications I have read about use 60-mil or 75-mil, but we do want a roof built to last.” After reading a couple of articles on the topic by GBA Senior Editor Martin Holladay, Hoene is leaning toward an unvented roof assembly (see the sketch above), which would include cellulose insulation in the rafter bays and 4 inches of extruded polystyrene (XPS) rigid insulation above a layer of airtight sheathing. That would be followed by a second layer of OSB or plywood sheathing and, finally, the metal roofing.“Does the diagram look like a good approach?” he asks. “Any details that I should pass along to our builder about the roof trusses?”Those questions are the start of this Q&A Spotlight. If only Kevin Hoene’s choices for a new roof boiled down to a choice between an EPDM membrane and metal, his life would probably seem a whole lot simpler.But Hoene, building a new home in Illinois and on the boundary between Climate Zones 4 and 5, will soon be weighing the pros and cons not only of different roof coverings, but also of what type of insulation to use, whether it should go above or below the roof sheathing, and whether the roof should be vented or unvented. In other words, nothing seems off the table.“Our house is being built near the boundary of Zone 4 and 5 in Illinois with a 1:12 pitch metal roof,” Hoene writes in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor. “I’ve done a lot of research on low-slope roofs because our builder does not have a lot of experience with flat roofs.” Where should the insulation go?Hoene has sketched an unvented roof assembly, but his builder and roofer both suggest he consider a vented roof assembly (see Image #2 at the bottom of the page).“They have not done an unvented roof with the layered foam above the sheathing and seem more comfortable doing the following approach and say it would save a lot of money in time and materials,” Hoene says.The builder suggests blown-in cellulose 16 inches deep, leaving the area above the insulation open for ventilation. Hoene adds: “He recommended no venting in the center of the roof due to more chances for leaks.”“It might be time to find a different roofer,” Holladay replies. “If you can locate a roofer familiar with commercial construction, you’ll be in better hands — because installing rigid foam above the roof sheathing is a standard method of insulating low-slope commercial roofs.“The approach shown in your sketch is associated with failures, because there isn’t enough of a difference in elevation between the ‘inlet’ vents and the ‘outlet’ vents. I call this type of ventilation ‘faith-based venting.’ Air rarely follows the ‘smart arrows’ that some designers draw to indicate where the air is supposed to enter, and where it is supposed to leave.”The same roofer who has suggested 90-mil EPDM also would prefer keeping all of the insulation below the sheathing. Hoene says he would insulate from below using blown-fiberglass with some sort of adhesive that allows it to bond with the decking, or to use spray foam.Holladay is unconvinced. “I stand by my advice,” he says. “For an unvented flat roof, you want at least some — or ideally, all — of the insulation to be above the roof sheathing. That way, the roof sheathing stays warm and dry.”last_img read more

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