Honor V10 launched with 18:9 bezel-less display, AI-backed Kirin 970 processor & dual cameras

first_imgHuawei sub-brand Honor on Tuesday unveiled the V10 – a near bezel-less smartphone and successor to the Honor V9. Honor’s newest flagship has been teased for a while now, and the actual design is surprisingly different from what past leaks have suggested. Apart from sporting minimal bezels, the Honor V10 keeps a home button on the front, a dual rear camera setup on the back and is powered by the AI-backed Kirin 970 processor, among other things.The Honor V10 is currently available for pre-orders in China and will go on sale from December 5. Notably, that is also the date when handset will be launched globally as the Honor 9 Pro. To recall, the V9 was launched as the Honor 8 Pro internationally. The phone starts from CNY 2699 (approx. 26,300) for the 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage variant, CNY 2999 (approx. Rs 29,300) for the 6GB + 64GB option, and CNY 3499 (approx. Rs 34,200) for the 6GB + 128GB storage variant.Honor’s newest smartphone sports an edge-to-edge display similar to the Honor 9i, Honor 7X and Huawei’s Mate 10 Pro. The only notable difference on the front is the inclusion of the home button like the Mate 10 which houses the fingerprint scanner, something that is a rarity these days with bezel-less phones. This means that the rear of the V10 sports a clean metal unibody design with just the Honor logo on the middle and a dual camera setup on the top left. The back is also similar to the Honor 7X, only the antenna lines here have been pushed to the edges.advertisementAlso Read: Honor 7X quick review: A familiar yet stylish mid-range phoneThe Honor V10 comes with Android 8.0 Oreo out-of-the-box with Huawei’s EMUI 8.0 skin on top. It sports a 5.99-inch full HD+ (1080×2160) display with a 2.5D curved glass on top and an aspect ratio of 18:9. It is powered by the flagship octa-core Kirin 970 processor that comes with AI functionalities baked right in. The chipset, which comes with a dedicated Neural Processing Unit (NPU) that can process 2000 images per second, has so far powered the Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro. As mentioned previously, the V10 comes in a choice of three options – 4GB/64GB, 6GB/64GB and 6GB/128GB variants.As far as optics are concerned, the Honor V10 rocks a dual camera system on the back that comprise of one 16-megapixel sensor and one 20-megapixel sensor with f/1.8 aperture, but no OIS. The front gets a 13-megapixel camera with f/2.0 aperture. The handset houses a 3750mAh battery with support for SuperCharge fast charging. The Honor V10 features a hybrid dual-SIM setup, measures only 6.97mm in thickness and keeps the 3.5mm headphone jack.last_img read more

Read More

GoAir sale of tickets at just Rs 1199 has customers reeling

first_imgGoAir flight. (Representational Image)Wikimedia CommonsLow-cost airline GoAir has announced a massive two-day sale beginning Thursday, January 3. It is offering all-inclusive flight tickets at Rs 1,199 between major cities like Pune, Ahmedabad, Chandigarh, Mumbai, Patna, Bengaluru, Delhi, Goa, Hyderabad, Ranchi, Kolkata, Lucknow, Nagpur and Chennai.The cheapest ticket is priced at Rs 1,199 from Chennai to Port Blair in Andaman and Nicobar Islands.Some of the routes are Goa-Mumbai (Rs 1,499; travel period: July 15 to September 8), Patna-Kolkata (Rs 1,299; travel period: July 1 to September 8), Goa-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20), Goa-Hyderabad (Rs 1,399; travel period: July 1 to September 15), Hyderabad-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20).Interested customers can go to the company’s website and buy their tickets under the ‘Fly Smart, Save Big’ category.In December 2018, GoAir had offered all-inclusive tickets priced at Rs 1,499 for trips between April 1, 2019, and June 30, 2019.last_img read more

Read More

Obama says think before you tweet

first_imgBarack ObamaFormer US president Barack Obama said Friday that social media powers like Facebook, WhatsApp and Twitter are leading to “snap judgements to complex issues” and warned leaders to think before tweeting.Obama was repeatedly asked about his successor, President Donald Trump, at a New Delhi symposium but stuck to a general warning to all high-profile figures to take care.”I think it’s important to be mindful of both the power of these tools but also its limits,” Obama said when asked about the dangers of Twitter, a platform on which Trump has caused repeat controversies.”What I would say is Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, all these various platforms are extraordinarily powerful tools, and those tools can be used for good and they tools can be used for ill,” he said.Highlighting how he has 100 million Twitter followers — “more than other people who use it more often” — Obama said: “I think it’s important to be mindful of both the power of these tools but also its limits.”Obama’s wife Michelle recently took what was seen as a subtle swipe at Trump, asking the audience at an event to spellcheck and not tweet everything that comes into their mind.”I think she was just giving a general advice, the same advice that you used to hear from your mother generally … don’t say the first thing that pops in your head,” the two-term leader told the conference, which was organised by the Hindustan Times newspaper.”Your mother and father knew better. Listen to them. Don’t do things like that. Think before you speak, think before you tweet.”- ‘Destructive populism’ -Obama was more direct in criticising Trump’s threat to leave the 2015 Paris climate accord on slashing global carbon emissions.”It is an agreement that — even though we have a little bit of a pause in American leadership — is giving our children a fighting chance,” he said.Trump has threatened several times to withdraw from the Paris accord saying it is crippling US business. He has called for the agreement to be renegotiated.Obama would not be drawn into other questions about the US administration at the appearance where he called “destructive populism” a threat to modern democracy.”The thing I love about America and I suspect the thing you love about India is just this cacophony of life and it throws up all kinds of variety,” Obama said in response to one attempt to force a comment on Trump.”There are political trends in American that I don’t agree with and abide by but I recognise as part of a running thread in American life.”Obama said he has become “obsessed” with the way news is handled and consumed, particularly by the young.”We are more connected than ever before but … more and more we are fitting facts to suit our opinions rather than formulating our opinions based on facts,” said Obama, who was in China before visiting India, and next goes to Paris.last_img read more

Read More

Brexit unrest may lead to queens evacuation

first_imgBritain`s Queen Elizabeth presents James Dyson with the insignia of members of the Order of Merit, during a private audience at Buckingham Palace, London on 19 July, 2016. Photo: ReutersBritish officials have revived Cold War emergency plans to relocate the royal family should there be riots in London if Britain suffers a disruptive departure from the European Union next month, two Sunday newspapers reported.”These emergency evacuation plans have been in existence since the Cold War, but have now been repurposed in the event of civil disorder following a no-deal Brexit,” the Sunday Times said, quoting an unnamed source from the government’s Cabinet Office, which handles sensitive administrative issues.The Mail on Sunday also said it had learnt of plans to move the royal family, including Queen Elizabeth, to safe locations away from London.Britain’s government is struggling to get parliamentary support for a Brexit transition agreement with the EU before the departure date of March 29, and the government and businesses are preparing contingency plans for a ‘no-deal’ Brexit.Business groups have warned of widespread disruption if there are lengthy delays to EU imports due to new customs checks, and even possible shortages of food and medicine.Last month an annual speech by the 92-year-old queen to a local women’s group was widely interpreted in Britain as a call for politicians to reach agreement over Brexit.Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative lawmaker and keen supporter of Brexit, told the Mail on Sunday he believed the plans showed unnecessary panic by officials over a no-deal Brexit, as senior royals had remained in London during World War Two bombing.But the Sunday Times said an ex-police officer formerly in charge of royal protection, Dai Davies, expected Queen Elizabeth would be moved out of London if there was unrest.”If there were problems in London, clearly you would remove the royal family away from those key sites,” Davies was quoted as saying.last_img
Read More

Dengue snatches three more lives

first_imgAn aedes mosquito. File PhotoThree more persons have died of dengue and 1,460 others have been infected with the mosquito-borne disease, showing a fall in the number of dengue patients than Friday’s 1,719, reports UNB.The fresh deaths were recorded in Dhaka and Faridpur on Saturday while the new infections in 24 hours till Saturday morning.In Dhaka, a woman lost her battle to dengue while undergoing treatment at Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) in the morning.The deceased was Monwara Begum, 45, wife of Saiful Islam of Chamakpur village in Mithamain upazila of Kishoreganj district.Saiful said Monwara was admitted to Kishoreganj Sadar Hospital after she was diagnosed with dengue about 10 days back.She was taken to the DMCH on 13 August where she died at the intensive care unit around 10:45am, he said.In Faridpur, two persons, including a college student, died of dengue at Faridpur Medical College Hospital. The deceased were Sumon Bashar Raj, 18, son of Mizanur Rahman of Changpur village in Magura district and a second-year student of a government college in Magura, and Yunus Sheikh, 55, son of Aynal Sheikh of Rajbari.Mostafizur Rahman Bulu, assistant director of the hospital, said Sumon was admitted to the hospital on 12 August and he breathed his last around 10:00am.The victim’s father said Sumon was detected with dengue at Magura Hospital on 8 August and later sent to the medical college hospital.Yunus died of the mosquito-borne disease at the hospital around 7:00pm, said hospital director Kamda Prasad Saha.He was taken to the hospital on 12 August with dengue, he said.Of the new dengue infections, 621 were reported in Dhaka city alone while the rest in other divisions, according to the Health Emergency Operation Centre and Control Room of the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS).The number of dengue patients was 1,719 on Friday while 1,929 on Thursdays and 1,880 on Wednesday.The government has so far confirmed 40 deaths although unofficial estimates suggest the death toll is much higher.The DGHS said 51,476 people were hospitalised with dengue since January this year. Of them, 43,580 had made full recovery.Currently, 7,856 patients are undergoing treatment at different hospitals and clinics.Bangladesh is grappling with its worst outbreak of dengue. Dhaka, the densely-populated megacity, has been at the centre of the outbreak.There is no specific treatment for dengue or severe dengue, WHO says. But early detection and access to proper medical care lowers fatality rates below one per cent.last_img read more

Read More

Oil searchers discover and record deepsea graveyard off Angola coast

first_img © 2014 Phys.org A team of researchers looking for oil and gas deposits beneath the seafloor off the western coast of southern Africa has found four large “fish-falls” on the seabed: the carcasses of one whale shark and three mobulid rays. Finding vertebrate carcasses on the seafloor is quite rare, ocean scientists Nicholas Higgs, Andrew Gates and Daniel Jones report in their paper on the discovery published in PLoS ONE—the “graveyard” offers a unique opportunity to learn more about how the death of large sea creatures and the food they provide to other smaller creatures impacts marine life in general. Still images showing each of the observed carcasses. A Whale shark (Rhincodon typus); B Mobulid carcass 1; C Mobulid carcass 2; D Mobulid Carcass 3. Images have been enhanced. Credit: PLoS ONE, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096016.g002 Citation: Oil searchers discover and record deep-sea graveyard off Angola coast (2014, May 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-oil-searchers-deep-sea-graveyard-angola.html Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species To date, just nine vertebrate carcasses have ever been found and studied on the deep ocean floor—this recent discovery pushes that number to thirteen. Such carcass remains are categorized by “fall” type. These four were all fish falls, other’s such as whale falls generally attract more attention.Recorded along with the carcasses were scavengers that had arrived at the scene to feast on the large creatures’ remains. The researchers note that quite often the first to arrive at a fall of any sort are sharks, though they rarely consume what has been found. Next to find the carcasses are usually crabs and amphipods and at some point osedax that feed on the bones. In the footage the researchers were able to see large numbers of fish surrounding the carcasses, the majority of which were eel pouts, which don’t eat carcass remains, but instead feed on other fish that do. The researchers noted that no evidence of osedax were present which suggested that the carcasses hadn’t been on the sea floor very long, perhaps just a month or two. Explore further Journal information: PLoS ONE More information: Higgs ND, Gates AR, Jones DOB (2014) Fish Food in the Deep Sea: Revisiting the Role of Large Food-Falls. PLoS ONE 9(5): e96016. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096016AbstractThe carcasses of large pelagic vertebrates that sink to the seafloor represent a bounty of food to the deep-sea benthos, but natural food-falls have been rarely observed. Here were report on the first observations of three large ‘fish-falls’ on the deep-sea floor: a whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and three mobulid rays (genus Mobula). These observations come from industrial remotely operated vehicle video surveys of the seafloor on the Angola continental margin. The carcasses supported moderate communities of scavenging fish (up to 50 individuals per carcass), mostly from the family Zoarcidae, which appeared to be resident on or around the remains. Based on a global dataset of scavenging rates, we estimate that the elasmobranch carcasses provided food for mobile scavengers over extended time periods from weeks to months. No evidence of whale-fall type communities was observed on or around the carcasses, with the exception of putative sulphide-oxidising bacterial mats that outlined one of the mobulid carcasses. Using best estimates of carcass mass, we calculate that the carcasses reported here represent an average supply of carbon to the local seafloor of 0.4 mg m−2d−1, equivalent to ~4% of the normal particulate organic carbon flux. Rapid flux of high-quality labile organic carbon in fish carcasses increases the transfer efficiency of the biological pump of carbon from the surface oceans to the deep sea. We postulate that these food-falls are the result of a local concentration of large marine vertebrates, linked to the high surface primary productivity in the study area. Because fall finds are so rare, researchers have resorted to dropping dead animals into the ocean and then studying what happens—finding four such natural carcasses is unprecedented, leading to questions as to why so many of the animals died seemingly at the same time. The researchers suggest the graveyard may not be as rare as the finding would suggest, as its possible many exist but have simply not been found—the ocean floor is a vast expanse after all, and the chances of happening upon a fall while studying any given section of sea floor would be slim. Despite that, many must exist as many sharks, rays, whales, exist in the sea and they all must die at some point. Scientists estimate that as much as 4 percent of food in the ocean comes from falls—the rest is in the form of marine snow. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More