Wet weather swamping early May

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Andrew Armstrong – Clark CountyIt is nice and soggy over here. When we started planting two weeks ago, it took us all day to get the problems worked out of the corn planter. We did get 100 acres of corn planted and that was it. It started raining that evening and we have not been out in the field since. As of yesterday and today we mowed an awful lot of grass. That is all we have been able to accomplish. The corn has spiked through, but it is pretty slow going. Between yesterday and today I am guessing it will jump up a little bit more.We haven’t set out a rain gauge. We can measure it but as far as we are concerned it is just too wet and we really don’t want to know how much rain we have gotten. If we did have a rain gauge out it would have probably washed away by now anyway.We did not spray our bean stubble when we did burndown, just the corn stubble. The corn stubble is looking fine but the bean stubble fields are looking pretty bushy right now.The people I have talked to are not depressed or anything yet, but we are getting anxious. It is going to get done. Back in 2011 we had a year resembling this right now and we got done and in fact had a pretty good year that year. We had some record yields for fields that year. As we are waiting, I am doing a parts inventory so if something were to go down when we are in the fields we’ll be able to go to the shelf, grab it and go. Hopefully that will help us keep moving when we are able to get in the fields.Yesterday and today are about the only days where there are no chances for rain. Tuesday and Thursday are our next big chances for rain. I heard someone say they are friends with a meteorologist who said it really doesn’t look good for the rest of the month until the beginning of June. But, of course, that is a meteorologist and we know how they can be.We’ll get it done one way or another. We always seem to find a way. We are not trying to push the envelope, though. It still is just the beginning of May.Dylan Baer – Wood CountyWe are stuck in the Black Swamp. I do not know the exact amount of rain we have gotten but last Saturday was day 9 of consecutive rainfall. When it rains a little every day it adds up. There is no real flooding, just wet holes everywhere that never get a chance to dry out. There has not really been any field work.Before that 9 days of rain there was a day and a half where we did some ATV spraying to kill a neighbor’s wheat field that didn’t make it. We are hoping maybe tomorrow we can start on some pre-emerge. Yesterday and today are the first days we’ve seen sunshine in a while.The wheat does not look good. This is officially the latest we have not gotten our wheat topdressed. There were a couple of days where it was maybe dry enough to go, but it was windy. We should have gone out, but we didn’t. But then again, with 8 or 10 inches of rain in the last 3 weeks, if you have all that nitrogen out there, you could really lose a lot.We only need 8 or 10 days of good weather to get everything in. It is still just the first part of May and we are trying to keep ourselves from looking at the calendar and just watch the weather. With the markets the way they are, there is just not as much excitement to get into the fields anyway.There are a couple of corn stalk fields with some peppergrass showing up and some dandelions. Most of our fields are hanging in there pretty well. We have an adequate stand of rye in our bean stubble ground and they are still pretty clean. It has just been wet. In the next couple days we will hopefully dry out some. We’ll get our window. We always do.Nathan Brown – Highland CountyOn April 24 we got 32 acres planted in a cereal rye field that was systematically tiled 4 or 5 years ago. Everybody else was pretty wet. The cereal rye and the drainage really helped that field dry out. We were able to at least get that one field of soybeans planted to get things worked out with the planter so we are ready to go. It was kind of a rolling field anyway. The rye did a nice job of pulling out the moisture. There was one damp spot in the field where the stand of rye was pretty thin right in that area. Nearly all of the field was in perfect condition.I have not checked the beans in the last day or so. Last Thursday, about 8 days after they’d been planted, they had a good sprout on them. If the weather holds this week, I hope we’ll have some beans out of the ground.The beans planted March 24 were planted at 2 inches deep. I thought that would keep them in the ground longer to avoid frost, which it did. But, being 2 inches deep, there was not enough warmth to actually get them up and out of the ground once they germinated. Next year I’ll hopefully try planting early again in another plot and I’ll shallow up my planting. I learned a lot from the experiment.We are wet and pastures are wet, but guys are running out of hay. It was tough to make hay last summer because of the wet weather and now people are running out. If you run out of hay you have to do something. Guys are going ahead with grazing, trying to keep the cows out of the low areas and stay on the high ground to do the least amount of damage possible.Wheat looks really good. I am surprised it does with as much rain as we’ve had. We are getting ready to go out and pull tissue samples and we are thinking about spraying some fungicide next week. We think with the weather we’ve had we may have lost some nitrogen. The tissue samples will help us to know where we are at, at least within the plant.Lamar Liming – Trumbull/ Mahoning CountyWe have water sitting lots of places. I do not know a rainfall total, but we are a lot wetter now than we were two weeks ago. We’ve been doing some burndown spraying. The fields are starting to green up pretty good now. We finally started on that the last day or two. But other than that, there has not really been any field work.The hay seems to be coming right along and it looks pretty good. It has some good growth to it.The temperatures have been up one day and down another. It is supposed to be 75 today and then start cooling down again some. It is hard to get fields warmed up with this weather. A lot of the days when we don’t get rain there is still no sun or warmth and we don’t really dry out any, even when we aren’t actually getting rain.There is a lot of concern about the calendar and the weather forecast doesn’t look good either. I don’t know how backed up we are going to get. There is a high percentage chance for rain a couple of days this week.The milk price has been bumping up the last month I guess. Maybe there is little hope there. It still has a little ways to go and there is a lot of ground to be made up.We have been able to haul enough to keep ahead of the manure. Some people are getting really backed up, though. Since the end of last summer spreading manure has been a real challenge.last_img read more

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Designing a Low-Slope Roof That Works

first_imgThe recessed can light conundrumThere is yet another wrinkle to this roofing saga: the use of recessed light fixtures in the ceiling. They would be installed in the drywall that serves as the air barrier. Hoene wonders if that’s going to be a problem.Holladay says, “Absolutely, that’s a problem.”He continues, “You want to minimize all penetrations and electrical boxes in an airtight ceiling, and all penetrations need to be very carefully air sealed. If you care about energy performance, you won’t have any recessed can lights in your ceiling.”Dorsett adds that certain types of recessed lights come with gaskets to make them airtight, and they are rated for contact with insulation. But, he says, they should be inspected and installed carefully.“There are also surface-mount LED fixtures that can be mounted on standard electric boxes that present a far smaller and far shallower penetration into the insulation layer, which may be a better alternative,” Dorsett says. “Any penetration of the ceiling gypsum needs to be detailed for air tightness.” Insulating Low-Slope Residential RoofsHow to Install Rigid Foam On Top of Roof SheathingSpraying Polyurethane Foam Over an Existing RoofQuestions and Answers About Air BarriersBan the CanRethinking Recessed LightingCold-Weather Performance of PolyisocyanurateGreen Basics: Rigid Foam Insulation Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam SheathingHow to Build an Insulated Cathedral CeilingAll About Attic VentingGreen Basics: Attics, Structure, Claddings RELATED ARTICLES Our expert’s opinionHere’s how GBA Technical Director Peter Yost sees Hoene’s situation:Per usual on roofing and attic questions, I like to check in with Brian Knowles at RoofsPlus, a local high-performance roofing company. Here is a summary of my discussion with Brian:Is a 1:12 standing seam roof OK? Yes, but use a full-coverage membrane such as Ice and Water Shield as the roofing underlayment. Also, use a hidden-clip system rather than exposed fasteners, and back up the standing seam lock seam with a high-performance sealant. Brian’s company uses Geocel Tripolymer.Using an EPDM membrane would be OK as well. But, exposed roofing membranes typically don’t fail in the field of the installation, but at joints and laps. These need to be inspected annually. Brian’s company never uses 45-mil membranes but finds the 60-mil performs well. They have never used 90-mil EPDM.For both types of cladding, the devil is in the details at the eaves: With a slope this low, making a watertight seal between either the membrane or the standing seam and the fascia is tricky, particularly if the site has wind exposure. Brian has found that even manufacturers’ recommended eave details are not robust and his company has developed some of their own details.Here is Brian’s cut: “Fully adhered EPDM systems (where there is no curb or parapet termination) need to be stripped in to metal drip edge with cover tape. The published details will show the EPDM fastened under the drip edge metal. They show cover tape over the drip edge and onto the EPDM. This detail leaves the strip of cover tape vulnerable to damage from sliding ice and snow. Our manufacturer trainers have approved a slightly different detail that has a more successful field application in areas where ice and snow are a factor (see Image #3, below). Bear in mind that these edge details will require regular inspection over the years to maintain the bond at the edge. A parapet or curb detail is preferred when using EPDM.”Color matters. In cold climates, white membranes and white metal roofs can be associated with significant night-sky radiation and much cooler attic spaces.On the question of whether to vent the roof assembly: A dedicated space of 1 to 2 inches just underneath or above the structural roof sheathing will vent the assembly. The space created between the structural roof deck and the finished ceiling is an attic space. This space can be vented along any of the margins of the attic but typically with vents at the eaves or sometimes rooftop turbine or “whirlybird” vents. Brian and I agree that the attic (or in this case almost a plenum) space needs to be either completely inside or outside the conditioned space and it needs air flow in either case. But note: If the attic is outside, then it means venting it with outside air; if the attic is inside, then it means introducing inside air flow. (Read on for more details…)In Brian’s experience, even though a 1:12 pitch gives you negligible stack effect air movement or venting, when the roof cladding — particularly a darker one — is exposed to solar gain, that attic space heats up quite a bit and air flow develops even without stack effect from eave to eave or eave to ridge. So, the “high-low” eave vents in the second hand-drawn image will work fine for venting this “outside” attic space. And of course in this case, the finished ceiling plane is where the continuous air and thermal boundaries will be.On the other hand, you could insulate and air seal this roof at the roof line, in which case the attic space created between the roof and the ceiling plane becomes an inside space. It’s important to create air flow for this space, even if it is just passive vents that relieve this space.But note, if you air seal and insulate the finished ceiling plane, then the roof assembly above can dry to the interior. On the other hand, if you insulate and air seal the roof line, and you don’t vent the underside or topside of the structural roof deck, then you’ll have little to no drying potential in either direction. What kind of insulation will work best?Hoene’s original plan was to use 4 inches of XPS, which has a nominal R-rating of 5 per inch. Better take that with a grain of salt, Dorsett says.“Four inches of XPS won’t perform at R-20 for the full 50+ year lifecycle of most metal roofing,” he writes. “As it loses its blowing agent over a handful of decades its performance starts out higher than R-20, but eventually drops to about R-17. The R-5/inch labeling is based on something like a 20-year average performance.“R-17 might be sufficient for dew-point control, but it might not be,” he continues. “If instead you went with 5 inches of EPS [expanded polystyrene], its R-value will be pretty much the same on day 25,000 as on day 1, since its much lighter blowing agent dissipates quickly, and its labeled-R is its fully depleted R.”There are two other choices — polyisocyanurate and spray polyurethane foam.“Another roofer has proposed using 4.4 inches of polyiso insulation above the sheathing for an unvented assembly,” Hoene writes. “This builder said that XPS and EPS aren’t compatible with the EPDM adhesive. Quote from builder: ‘Like pouring gas in a styrofoam cup, it melts it away. They are typically used in ballasted or mechanically attached systems.’“The issue I have with polyiso is that I have read that the effective R-value in cold weather is lower, and polyiso should only be used in warmer climates,” he adds.One solution to polyiso’s less-than-optimum performance in cold weather, Holladay says, comes from building scientist John Straube, who once told him, “One option is to stick with polyiso and just make it thicker. If we do that, let’s call polyiso R-5 per inch.”Either open- or closed-cell polyurethane foam could be sprayed on the underside of the roof sheathing, another possible route to take. Choosing the type of roofingA first step, Holladay suggests, would be finding out whether the type of metal roofing Hoene is considering can be installed on the roof he’s planning. The pitch is very low — rising only 1 inch for every 12 inches of run — and some types of metal roofing need more than that.Hoene has discussed the possibility of using 60-mil EPDM instead, which apparently won’t present any aesthetic issues, but he wonders whether the membrane will perform as well as a standing-seam metal roof.“On low-slope roofs in the snow zone, EPDM will work better than standing-seam metal, since it can’t leak even under high winds, whereas metal roofs will,” writes Dana Dorsett. “With limited slope to drain well, it can take forever to be rid of any leakage moisture. EPDM won’t last as long as metal, but there’s a reason it’s the most common roofing for very low slope roofs.”Kevin Dickson also likes EPDM. It’s “great,” he says, and it’s available in white, which would reduce cooling loads in the house.An alternative, Dickson adds, is spray polyurethane, which will last “indefinitely” if it’s well maintained, meaning that it should be recoated every 10 years or so, and inspected carefully every year.In further conversations with a roofer familiar with low-slope assemblies, Hoene is told that a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM roof applied over 1/2-inch DensDeck Roof Boards is the best option.“Is the 90-mil thickness overkill?” he asks. “Most of the applications I have read about use 60-mil or 75-mil, but we do want a roof built to last.” After reading a couple of articles on the topic by GBA Senior Editor Martin Holladay, Hoene is leaning toward an unvented roof assembly (see the sketch above), which would include cellulose insulation in the rafter bays and 4 inches of extruded polystyrene (XPS) rigid insulation above a layer of airtight sheathing. That would be followed by a second layer of OSB or plywood sheathing and, finally, the metal roofing.“Does the diagram look like a good approach?” he asks. “Any details that I should pass along to our builder about the roof trusses?”Those questions are the start of this Q&A Spotlight. If only Kevin Hoene’s choices for a new roof boiled down to a choice between an EPDM membrane and metal, his life would probably seem a whole lot simpler.But Hoene, building a new home in Illinois and on the boundary between Climate Zones 4 and 5, will soon be weighing the pros and cons not only of different roof coverings, but also of what type of insulation to use, whether it should go above or below the roof sheathing, and whether the roof should be vented or unvented. In other words, nothing seems off the table.“Our house is being built near the boundary of Zone 4 and 5 in Illinois with a 1:12 pitch metal roof,” Hoene writes in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor. “I’ve done a lot of research on low-slope roofs because our builder does not have a lot of experience with flat roofs.” Where should the insulation go?Hoene has sketched an unvented roof assembly, but his builder and roofer both suggest he consider a vented roof assembly (see Image #2 at the bottom of the page).“They have not done an unvented roof with the layered foam above the sheathing and seem more comfortable doing the following approach and say it would save a lot of money in time and materials,” Hoene says.The builder suggests blown-in cellulose 16 inches deep, leaving the area above the insulation open for ventilation. Hoene adds: “He recommended no venting in the center of the roof due to more chances for leaks.”“It might be time to find a different roofer,” Holladay replies. “If you can locate a roofer familiar with commercial construction, you’ll be in better hands — because installing rigid foam above the roof sheathing is a standard method of insulating low-slope commercial roofs.“The approach shown in your sketch is associated with failures, because there isn’t enough of a difference in elevation between the ‘inlet’ vents and the ‘outlet’ vents. I call this type of ventilation ‘faith-based venting.’ Air rarely follows the ‘smart arrows’ that some designers draw to indicate where the air is supposed to enter, and where it is supposed to leave.”The same roofer who has suggested 90-mil EPDM also would prefer keeping all of the insulation below the sheathing. Hoene says he would insulate from below using blown-fiberglass with some sort of adhesive that allows it to bond with the decking, or to use spray foam.Holladay is unconvinced. “I stand by my advice,” he says. “For an unvented flat roof, you want at least some — or ideally, all — of the insulation to be above the roof sheathing. That way, the roof sheathing stays warm and dry.”last_img read more

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Making Ford v Ferrari: Cinematography at 100 mph

first_imgSee how director James Mangold relied on tried-and-true methods for shooting scenes at high speed—and invented a few techniques of his own.Ford v Ferrari sped past the competition at the box office last weekend, taking in $31 million. The mid-budget car drama set in the ’60s spent a decade coming to the big screen, and it was important to director James Mangold to make the racing scenes authentic.The filmmakers used four different race tracks to recreate the Le Mans track, and they used VFX to smooth over continuity issues like weather and time of day.One thing they didn’t fake was actors in the drivers’ seats. The crew used a variety of camera cars and other rigs to capture the heat of the race. We’ve already covered the vintage lenses used in the production, but let’s take a deeper look at the high-speed rigging.Process TrailersThe first tools Mangold and his team used were process trailers. Trucks tow these low-profile trailers bearing “picture cars” with cameras and lights situated around the actor. If you’re just working on a normal driving scene, you can use a standard truck to tow the car at low speeds. Because Ford v Ferrari is a racing film, however, the filmmakers used a specialized truck capable of hauling the trailer at high speeds.These work best if you’re shooting backward, showing the actor’s face and the track behind them, because the driver of the truck needs an uninhibited view of the track to drive.The behind-the-scenes for Ford v Ferrari show the filmmakers using a process trailer for both the Shelby Cobra and the Ford GT. The filmmakers used $100,000 replicas, which would have been expensive to damage or drill into, but they were much cheaper than $25 million for an authentic GT40 or Cobra.Hostess TraysHostess trays allow you to rig a camera to a car or process trailer for a side-on view of the driver. It’s a horizontal surface, usually covered in mounting points for a camera or lights, level with the window. Suction caps usually attach the tray at multiple points. Depending on the weight the tray will need to bear and how much movement it will endure, filmmakers sometimes use up to ten, each connected to the tray with a 15mm rod.Specialty VehiclesEven with a supercharged truck towing the process trailer, the filmmakers couldn’t get the 100+ mph speeds of real racing (the 1966 GT40 was capable of 210 mph on the straightaways). They also couldn’t record through the windshield.To solve this problem, they created a novel solution — a half car/half trailer. The GT40 replica housed a modern engine and a control pod on the roof. Not only was it capable of high speeds while carrying up to four cameras, but Christian Bale could sit in the “driver’s seat” and communicate with the director via radio while another operator drove him around the racetrack. The crew dubbed the vehicle the “Frankenstein car.”One Mile at a TimeJames Mangold and his crew recreated a bygone era and created a new kind of racing film by inventing gadgets and shooting practically at every opportunity. They only used CGI to hide wires and make the track seem more authentic. Because sometimes, there is no substitute for real speed.Cover image via Twentieth Century Fox.Want more on filmmaking? Check these out.Video Tutorial: Build Your Own $50 Car-Side Camera MountBuilding Your Own Car Rig — Commercial Insider EditionMeet the Pocket-Sized, Versatile Aputure MC Film LightGetting Your Lights and Camera in Impossible PlacesWhat “The Righteous Gemstones” Teaches About Directing Styleslast_img read more

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Student raped by director, teacher of Rajasthan school

first_imgAn 18-year-old student of Class XII was allegedly raped by the director and a teacher of her school for three-four months at Ajeetgarh, in Sikar district of Rajasthan, and was forced to undergo an abortion. The accused, Jagdish Yadav and Jagat Singh Gujjar, are now absconding.After her condition deteriorated following the abortion carried out at a private hospital in Shahpura, the girl was shifted to the Sawai Man Singh Government Hospital here last week. The girl’s family stated in the complaint lodged with the police that the accused would call the victim to the school on the pretext of extra classes and sexually abuse her. The police said that when the girl’s abortion was carried out last month, the two accused tricked the family members into believing that a surgery was being conducted for treatment of her stomach pain.Neem-Ka-Thana Deputy Superintendent of Police Kushal Singh said on Monday that a case of gang-rape and causing miscarriage without the girl’s consent had been registered. The police have recorded the statement of two doctors at the hospital in Shahpura.last_img read more

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