Ellen Meets Obama Friday

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf departed the country last Saturday for official visits to the United States of America and Belgium.  The visit is President Sirleaf’s second outside Liberia since the worsening of the Ebola crisis in 2014. She attended an Extraordinary Summit of the Mano River Union in Conakry, Guinea last Sunday, February 15.Following her departure from James Spriggs Payne Airport on Saturday, President Sirleaf was scheduled to make a brief stop-over in the Emirate of Sharjah, one of the states of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), to share her experience in Crisis Management at the International Government Communications Forum there.According to an Executive Mansion release, President Sirleaf travels on to Washington, D.C., where she will meet United States President Barrack Obama at the White House on Friday, February 27.President Sirleaf’s visit comes at a time of crucial cooperation between Liberia and the United States and also following President Obama’s announcement last week that the United States is moving to the next phase of its Ebola response which will be characterized by intensive efforts to reach zero Ebola case in West Africa.Due to the rapid decline in Ebola cases and the all but empty ETUs built by the Americans around the country, President Obama has withdrawn most of the four thousand strong military contingent sent to Liberia to help fight the epidemic. President Sirleaf will have the opportunity to thank President Obama and the American people for the extraordinary level of assistance to Liberia during the Ebola crises.  The White House has already issued an official statement announcing that President Obama looks forward to building on a strong and historic partnership with Liberia, and discussing a range of topics with President Sirleaf, including the ongoing Ebola response, the region’s economic recovery plans, and other issues of mutual interest.The withdrawal of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force, UNMIL, from Liberia in June 2016 and Liberia’s preparedness to take over full responsibility for its own security and the implications for the West African Sub-region will be a topic most likely to be discussed between Presidents Obama and Sirleaf.  The United States is a Permanent Member of the United Nations Security Council which is the only body that has the capability to maintain or extend the UNMIL withdrawal date.  While in the United States, the Liberian leader will also meet with Administration officials, Congressional leaders and other stakeholders. She will also speak at an event hosted by Democratic Senator Chris Coons and the U.S. Institute of Peace on February 26. President Sirleaf will then travel to Brussels, Belgium to participate in an Ebola Conference organized by the European Union (EU). The conference will bring together the three most affected Mano River Union countries (Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone) and will see the Liberian President perform the role of Spokesperson for the three countries.  The Brussels Conference, which is not a pledging conference, seeks to enable the affected countries to share their experiences and post Ebola plans and help aid the EU and other bilateral and multilateral organizations to plan better for the post-Ebola period.  From Brussels, the Liberian leader returns to the United States, where she will participate in the 20th anniversary celebration of the Beijing Platform for Action at the UN Headquarters in New York.  President Sirleaf is accompanied to the U.S. by Legal Advisor, Cllr. Seward Cooper; Finance and Development Planning Minister Amara Konneh; Information Minister Lewis G. Brown; Presidential Press Secretary Jerolinmek Piah; LBS Director General Ledgerhood Rennie; Executive Assistant Euphemia Brewer-Fasama, among others.  She will also be accompanied to Brussels by Montserrado County Representative Saah Joseph; Youth Advisor, Dr. Emmanuel Dolo; Assistant Health Minister for Preventive and Curative Services, Tolbert Nyenswah, Head of the Presidential Delivery Unit (PDU), Dr. Clarence Moniba and his Deputy Amos Seibo, among others.  While President Sirleaf is away, Defense Minister Brownie Samukai will chair the Cabinet in consultation with Vice President, Joseph Nyumah Boakai. President Sirleaf is expected to return home on March 13.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Nanotechnology to curb water pollution in mining

first_imgThe mining industry has also become far more water conscious and has begun using water-recovery technology on an industrial scale (Image: Brand SA)• Infographic: Mining in South Africa• Mining groups invested in South Africa • Infographic: Mining robot can save lives • Focus on African resources at Mining Indaba • Scientist gets mine drainage patent Sulaiman PhilipThe problem of acid water draining from abandoned mine dumps and shafts has long seemed insurmountable, with some estimates putting the pollution on the Witwatersrand as high as 350 million litres a day. New technology from Dow Sub-Saharan Africa is finally offering a solution.South Africa is the most industrialised and diverse economy in Africa, wealth built on mining. But while mining’s contribution to South Africa’s GDP has fallen, the industrial base built up around the industry has diversified and strengthened.The historical importance of mining has created not just legacy issues – the ecological disaster of acid mine drainage – but has also strained the country’s water supply. South Africa is a water-scarce country, with its limited resources having to be shared between domestic and industrial – agriculture, mining, power generation – users.Mining techniques have evolved since diamonds were discovered in 1867. There are no canaries in the coal mines and improved ventilation and extraction techniques have made South African mining among the safest in the world. The mining industry has also become far more water conscious and, with the help of companies like Dow Chemicals, has begun using water-recovery technology on an industrial scale.Ross McLean, president of Dow Sub-Saharan Africa, says the web of industries in South Africa makes it possible for the company to provide clients with synchronised services.“Power stations need a certain purity of water in the steam turbines. Today, you can set them up with a supply of recycled water from a mine – we have this kind of system in place in a power station in South Africa. We’ve helped with our technology for the purification of waste water from the mine to a standard where that recycled water can be used in the power station. This creates a green linkage from mining to energy, which of course is a critical sector.” Nanotechnology for water filtrationDow’s world-leading reverse osmosis, nano-filtration membranes and ion-exchange resins allows industry to optimise water management. For McLean the future of mining has to be about sustainability, and water management using Dow technology should be at the forefront of any decisions made about operations.  Karen Dobson, Dow’s global business director for mining, adds that the technology has the benefit of being able to, dependent on the system used, produce safe water with zero discharge.  She says Dow technology can play a greater role in removing heavy metals from aqueous tailing discharges. It also has value in the secondary recovery of valuable metals from tailings and waste streams, helping reduce mining’s environmental impact. “The environment and social pressures are becoming more challenging for the mining industry. These are some of the very problems and challenges facing the industry we believe we can contribute to providing sustainable solutions.”More than a century of mining has left South Africa with mountains of waste – tailings dumps – and networks of abandoned shafts. Shafts on the Witwatersrand are veined with pyrite – an iron sulphide known as “fool’s gold” because of its superficial lustre – which reacts with rainwater and groundwater to decompose into sulphuric acid. Pollution in major water sourcesGeologists estimate that acid drainage from abandoned mines on the Witwatersrand could reach 350-million litres per day. This is untreated water that flows into the watershed of the Vaal and Limpopo Rivers, which supply water to millions of peopleIn 2013 the government budgeted R150-million to deal with acid mine drainage. With 6 000 derelict mines in the country, the World Wide Fund for Nature estimates that South Africa would need to spend R30-billion to solve the problem. “The longer we wait to address this issue, the more it is going to cost the South African taxpayer in the long term,” Deon Nel, head of the WWF’s biodiversity division, told the Mercury in 2013.Dow has been actively marketing its nano- and ultra-filtration membranes as solutions to the legacy problems of the mining industry. Not only can the technology remove harmful components from tailing waters, but it has given birth to a secondary industry recovering valuable metals from tailings and waste streams. It can reclaim metals that were otherwise too expensive to recover while reducing the environmental damage done by mine dumps and abandoned shafts.For Dow, investing in technologies that solve problems like acid mine drainage is an investment in the future of the company. “Business will not be sustainable if we do not get that right,” says McLean.“Our solutions, especially in the mining space, can help deal with the legacy issues that remain after operations cease. Sustainability is at the core of how Dow does business. Not just in terms of how we manufacture products but how we take those products to our customers. It is a philosophy that we share with our customers who are looking to adopt best practice around sustainability.” According to Ross McLean an investment in sustainable technology is an investment in future succes. (Image: Dow Chemicals) Investing in AfricaOn average, the African economy is predicted to grow between 6% and 7% over the next two decades. Despite the forecast growth, just $3 of every $1 000 invested by American companies goes into Africa. For most investors Africa is still the dark continent of terrible headlines.But for companies already on the ground in Africa, like Dow, the continent is a thriving marketplace. Dow brings 117 years of expertise to a region with diverse needs and almost unlimited growth potential. In terms of Dow’s global business, sub-Saharan Africa is a relatively small market but, McLean argues, that market will grow more important as Africa industrialises. “In South Africa you would not say industrialisation, you would say it’s a drive to re-industrialisation – which the government is pushing. We see this market as really interesting because of its level of diversification plays to the variety of solutions we offer.” Dow is expanding in Africa, with offices in Egypt, Ghana, Nigeria, Morocco and Ethiopia.  McLean stresses that it remains a business-to-business company, one that touches most industries in sub-Saharan Africa. The level of diversification in African industry plays to Dow’s strengths and the solutions it can offer as well, McLean says.“Our investment is about putting more people on the ground to bring our technologies to our customers. We have been investing in chemistry, science and technology for 117 years. Deeply embedded in our history is a lot of know-how and technology. We have already invested a lot in the [environmentally sound] solutions and technologies that African industry needs.”McLean admits that each country in which Dow operates in has its unique problems, but the rewards of working in Africa are infinite. “There are some really interesting challenges. But the thing is, companies like us go after opportunities when the opportunity is big enough to warrant the risk. It’s a risk-reward balance; there is no question we see the opportunity for growth. I think we are succeeding.”Dow’s African strategy is the result of eight years of research on business conditions in Africa. And while it conforms to local conditions, the company has adopted a “be local but act global” approach to business. It has created systems to develop African talent and leadership, people who are then immersed in the culture of Dow.“We understand that large multinationals like us can’t really understand African markets until they have feet on the ground. Is Africa challenging?  Yes. You really have to adapt to the situation in each country. You almost need a manual on how to do business in Nigeria, Ghana, Ethiopia and South Africa.“Saying that, we do not compromise our standards around health, safety and the environment in Africa,” says McLean.“It would be far more expensive if we did not maintain our standards and got it wrong.  There are costs associated with doing it right, but we absolutely do not compromise. We’d sooner not do the business than break our own rules. If we businesses get that right, they will succeed in Africa.” Follow the Mining Indaba on social media: •           Twitter.com/MiningIndaba •           Miningindaba.com/Linkedin •           Facebook.com/africanminingindaba •           Youtube.com/Miningindabalast_img read more

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Reftract House: A 2009 Solar Decathlon Contender

first_imgIt would be understandable if participants in the Solar Decathlon feel the pressure of rising expectations – pressure to outdo the work of previous teams of faculty and students who have already put enormous energy and analysis into the 800-sq.-ft. net-zero-energy dwellings that became their Decathlon entries.The Santa Clara University undergraduates who make up one of the 20 teams competing in the 2009 Solar Decathlon, for example, might even feel a little extra pressure to measure up to SCU’s performance in the 2007 Decathlon, where the team entered the competition as an underdog but ended up winning third place overall.The good news is that, competitive as it is, the Decathlon also is an excellent teaching tool whose past entries can be analyzed, and improved upon, by current contestants.To that end, SCU, located in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Santa Clara, has been developing its entry for the 2009 Decathlon in collaboration with design, art, and architecture students at the nearby California College of the Arts.The SCU/CCA team aims to produce a “bold and luxurious home that demonstrates green living does not require a compromise in lifestyle,” the team says in its mission statement about the project.Called Refract House, the project derives it name from the notion that the SCU/CCA team is attempting to alter the path of net-zero-energy home design for the better, an idea that’s represented visually by the building’s bent-tube layout and technically by the way its layout controls the entry of light into the home as it wraps around a central courtyard.Ramping up for OctoberConstruction of the house is well underway, and the team has been busy not only overseeing the process but escorting visitors on tours of the building site, which is on the SCU campus. (Tour hours are noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 3 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; call (845) 323-8029 for information.)Of course, the Refract House’s big moment will be at the Solar Decathlon, scheduled for October 8 through 18 in Washington, D.C., where the home will be reconstructed on the National Mall, along with 19 other fully operational contest entries, for viewing by visitors and judges.Each Solar Decathlon team competes in 10 areas: architecture (for a maximum of 100 points), market viability (100 points), engineering (100 points), lighting design (75 points), communications (75 points), comfort zone (100 points), hot water (100 points), appliances (100 points), home entertainment (100 points), and the newest category, net metering (150 points).The 2009 field of competitors includes 16 teams from schools in the U.S., two from Canadian universities, and two from European universities.A biennial event sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Decathlon attracted a record 200,000 visitors in 2007. The house built for that contest by SCU, which doesn’t have an architecture school, did not do well in the architecture category. But it did land perfect scores in the hot water and energy balance categories, and ended up with a total of 979.959 points out of a possible 1,200 (the first-place winner, the team representing Technische Universität Darmstadt, scored 1,024.855 points).Decathlon teams play with their hearts as well as their heads. The DOE’s Decathlon website points out that SCU’s 2007 entry almost didn’t make it to the National Mall when the truck transporting the house broke an axle on its way to Washington. The house’s arrival was delayed by three days, but the SCU persevered.last_img read more

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Victolero admits Magnolia got outworked in Game 6 loss: They wanted it more than us

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew ANTIPOLO, Philippines—Winning three straight games wasn’t enough momentum for Magnolia to dispense Rain or Shine in the semifinals of the PBA Philippine Cup.ADVERTISEMENT Always ready to get his number called, Nambatac helps save Rain or Shine from elimination LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated View comments Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games messcenter_img In what could’ve been the Hotshots’ closeout game, the Elasto Painters instead took a convincing 91-81 win and forced a Game 7 on Sunday.Hotshots head coach Chito Victolero said Rain or Shine simply wanted it more than them especially in a fourth quarter that started off in a level playing field.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“They outworked us, they were more aggressive than us, they wanted it more than us,” said Victolero Friday at Ynares Center here. “It’s a good thing there’s a Game 7 so we’ll just try to watch film and look for what we can do better. We’ll be ready by Sunday.”Rain or Shine and Magnolia were tied in heading into the fourth quarter until the Elasto Painters slowly pulled away taking a 75-69 lead off of Rey Nambatac’s three-pointer with 7:14 to play. Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte MOST READ Nambatac then buried the Hotshots with two straight long bombs for Rain or Shine’s 83-71 lead with 3:57 remaining in the fourth.Victolero said the key to a Game 7 victory won’t rely much on the team’s adjustments but on the players’ desire to advance to a second straight finals appearance after winning the Governors’ Cup in December of 2018.“We just have to make minor adjustments, but basically it’s all about the will and the desire of the players,” said Victolero.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power gridlast_img read more

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Upgraded ESP Centre to Reach More Children with Disabilities

first_imgStory Highlights The $86-million centre, located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, was constructed by the Government through financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Chief Technical Director in the Ministry, Dione Jennings, said the expansion of the centre is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to protect persons with disabilities and promote their rights. Director of the Early Stimulation Programme (ESP), Antonica Gunter-Gayle, could hardly contain her joy at the recent opening of the programme’s upgraded facility for special needs children. Director of the Early Stimulation Programme (ESP), Antonica Gunter-Gayle, could hardly contain her joy at the recent opening of the programme’s upgraded facility for special needs children.“I feel great, I am excited; the staff is overcome. It is a good feeling,” she says.The $86-million centre, located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, was constructed by the Government through financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).It has a clinic, three assessment rooms with bathrooms, cubicles for early-childhood practitioners, sensory room and speech therapy room, and other units.Mrs. Gunter-Gayle said the upgraded centre will enable the ESP to improve assessment and intervention services for children with disabilities.“Our children with disabilities are children first, and I am really happy about this building,” she said.“We are giving them the opportunity to be the best that they can be to reach their highest potential,” she added.Operating under the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, the ESP caters to the developmental needs of children with disabilities up to six years, and currently provides early stimulation and interventions for more than 1,500 children across the island.Portfolio Minister, Hon. Shahine Robinson, said with the upgrading of the facility, the ESP is equipped to do more for its clientele, as it is now positioned to engage a wider corps of specialised professionals, including developmental psychologists, speech therapists, and occupational therapists.Over the long term, she says, the intention is to establish regional centres to provide early intervention services, which, she said, “will help to reduce the institutionalisation of young children with developmental disabilities across the island”.Senior Social Protection Specialist with the IDB, Donna Harris, commends the Government and its partners for “embarking on this important journey for the benefit of our children with disability. This wonderful structure represents the future of many of our kids”.Chief Technical Director in the Ministry, Dione Jennings, said the expansion of the centre is in keeping with the Government’s efforts to protect persons with disabilities and promote their rights.She says the Government is committed to promoting social protection and respect of all human beings, breaking down barriers of discrimination and building bridges of inclusion.She points out that approximately 60 per cent of ESP beneficiaries are on the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), and have limited access to intervention services.Mrs. Jennings says measures aimed at promoting and protecting the rights of persons in situations of vulnerability will continue and “we are assured that the staff and beneficiaries of this facility will be even more energised in their commitment”.Omar Francis, who is the Assistant to Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, says the upgrading of the centre is a welcome development.Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson (left), interacts with children at the upgraded Early Stimulation Programme (ESP) facility located at 95 Hanover Street, downtown Kingston, at the recent official opening. Looking on is Omar Francis, who is the Assistant to Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton.“Early intervention for disadvantaged kids has been proven to have dramatic long-term effects. When incorporated with early-childhood education, nutrition and health, the lasting effects are invaluable,” he states.He says studies have shown that children who receive early treatment are at significantly lower risk for serious cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as stroke and diabetes.“These findings demonstrate the great potential of coordinated birth to age five early-childhood programmes to prevent chronic disease, reduce healthcare costs and produce a flourishing society,” Mr. Francis points out.Opposition Spokesperson on Labour and Social Security, Dr. Fenton Ferguson, also welcomes the development, describing it as a “worthy response to our children with disabilities”.Technical management for the project was provided by the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF).The assessment centre is part of a Government of Jamaica Integrated Social Protection and Labour Programme, aimed at improving human capital and labour market outcomes for the poor by enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of key social protection programmes.Since 1975, the ESP has been serving the special needs community, and has reached some 30,000 children through various intervention services.In addition to assessment of children with disabilities, the ESP provides rehabilitative therapy, community-based intervention services within homes, schools, health centres, and day-care facilities, as well as counselling support for families and caregivers of special needs children.last_img read more

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Hanjin Selling Terminal Operations at Port of Seattle

first_imgzoom As part of the agreement to sell its stake in Total Terminals International (TTI), the bankrupt South Korean carrier Hanjin Shipping is also shedding its operations in the port of Seattle.Namely, an affiliate of Geneva-based Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) will purchase Hanjin’s stake in Total Terminals International (TTI), the operator of Terminal 46 at the port of Seattle and the Californian port of Long Beach.The 54 percent share will be sold to MSC’s Luxembourg-based Terminal Investment Limited.“The terminal is leased until 2025. It’s hard to know what the long-term effects of this sale might be. We know the industry remains in flux as shipping lines shift their alliances,” a representative from Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) said.Last week, the Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners gave its approval for the deal, under which MSC will take over sole control of the long-term lease of the port’s largest terminal, the 381-acre Pier T container terminal.The deal also guarantees the accelerated installation of ship-to-shore cranes capable of handling the world’s biggest container ships, the port of Long Beach earlier said.MSC already holds the remaining 46 percent stake in Total Terminals International.After the deal received approval from the Seoul Central District Court, the South Korean bankruptcy court sought approval from U.S. authorities, including the relevant ports.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Top Carriers Combined Capacity Hits New Record

first_imgzoom Driven by a spate of recent shipping industry consolidation moves, the combined capacity share operated by the Top 10 carriers reached a new record in 2017, according to Alphaliner.Increased market concentration has led to a rise in the major carriers’ combined capacity share, which stood at a record high of 77% at the end of the year.The consolidation spree was capped by the completion of the Hapag-Lloyd acquisition of UASC in May and Maersk’s acquisition of Hamburg Süd at the end of November.Alphaliner said that this figure is set to continue rising to reach 82% with the impending absorption of OOCL by COSCO and the merger of K Line, MOL and NYK to form Ocean Network Express (ONE).The top three carrier postitions in the global operator rankings are still being held by Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM.However, COSCO and Hapag-Lloyd have closed the gap through consolidation moves in the last two years. Following the completion of acquisition of OOCL, COSCO is expected to leap into the number three spot, Alphaliner commented.last_img read more

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The Wilmington Insider For June 1 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Friday, June 1, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Scattered showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 2pm. Areas of fog before 9am. Otherwise, cloudy, with a high near 82. Southwest wind 3 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New rainfall amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.In The Community:  The Wilmington Youth Soccer Association is holding a Parents Night Out and Cornhole Tournament from 7pm to 11pm at the Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks (777 South Street). The event will feature music and karaoke from Two Cousins DJ; raffle table; 50/50 raffle; dancing; finger foods; cash bar; a cornhole tournament; and more. Tickets cost $20 each. Tables for $200 are available.  Entry in the Cornhole Tournament, which begins at 8pm, costs $10, with “rebuttals” costing $5. To purchase tickets, contact Jessica Scanlon (jcscanlon09[at]gmail.com), Emily Broussard (emilybroussard2002[at]yahoo.com), Megan Howie (Meganhowie5[at]gmail.com), or Alison Zaya (ali.zaya[at]gmail.com).In The Community: Artists from Wilmington and surrounding towns will compete once again for ribbons and cash prizes in the Wilmington Council for the Arts’ 38th Annual Art Exhibition. The event takes place at the Wilmington Arts Center (219 Middlesex Avenue). The exhibition begins on Friday, June 1, 2018, from 6:30pm to 8:30pm, with a reception, refreshments and live music. The exhibition continues on Saturday, June 2, 2018, from noon to 4pm. The reception and exhibition are open to the public, and free of charge. Last year’s artwork can be viewed HERE.DEADLINE: The Wilmington High School Athletic Hall of Fame Committee has announced that the nomination deadline for this year is June 1, 2018. All nominations must be received by the deadline in order to be considered. Established in 1990, Wilmington’s Hall of Fame honors the school’s athletes, coaches, benefactors, and special contributors.The selection process is based on the rule that the candidates for induction be evaluated on what they did in sports while at Wilmington High School exclusively. Achievements in sports while at college or at the professional level will have no bearing on the selection committee’s deliberations. To be eligible for nomination, the athletes must have participated in at least one varsity sport. Athletes nominated for the Hall of Fame must have graduated at least ten years prior to nomination.All nominations should be emailed to wildcathof@gmail.com.At Wilmington Public Schools: Wilmington High School’s Annual Scholarship Night takes place from 6:30pm to 8pm in the WHS Gymnasium.At The Library: Needleworkers meet at 10am. Drop-In Story Time at 10am.  [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Video Exercise at 10am. Special Exercise at 11am. Bingo at 1pm. Cards at 1:30pm. [Learn more HERE.]Go Wildcats!: No games scheduled.Live Music: Pacific Grove (211 Lowell Street) is hosting karaoke with Winnell Entertainment beginning at 8pm.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Friday, June 7, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”Wilmington Youth Soccer To Hold Parents Night Out & Cornhole Tournament On June 7In “Sports”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, August 12, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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