‘Inter-Party Collaboration Can Produce Better Results in 2017’

first_img“Having met and deliberated at its quarterly National Executive Committee Meeting after the Ganta Declaration, the Movement for Economic Empowerment (MOVEE) firmly believes that with more than 20 registered parties courting a voting population of less than 2 million, interparty collaboration has the potential to produce a better outcome for the 2017 elections.” Those were the words of MOVEE Chairman D. Maxwell Kemayah when he spoke to journalists yesterday at the party’s headquarters on the Old Road. He said the party remains resolute that governing the country is a collective responsibility as proffered in the Ganta Declaration, for which MOVEE is prepared to lead ‘a coalition of like minds’ to put the country on a new course for transformation.“Our purpose for fielding candidates in the ensuing presidential and legislative elections is to bring about meaningful changes the country desires; changes that seem to always be one step ahead of us for the past 169 years. This has led us to the bottom of the development ladder to the extent that the majority of our population is stuck in perpetual poverty,” he added. Kemayah said political parties are not investing time, energy and resources in the collaboration process to simply remove a particular party from the highest office. “All of them are interested to put the greed for power over the moral imperative of the people first,” he added.He said MOVEE is not interested in political power for personal aggrandizement, but rather to economically empower Liberians, create better opportunities for jobs and sustained economic growth and development to build a better justice system. “To achieve this, we will fight to defeat the Unity Party as a necessary condition. This, we believe, is the view of the majority of Liberians,’ said Kemayah. But while the defeat of the Unity Party is a necessary condition to transform the country for the better, we need a leader that is prepared to be the nation’s chief servant that confronts changes of our new destiny with courage and innovation, he added. “Collaboration among political parties for us must focus on the question of leadership, because we have always said leadership matters; and in Liberia, we have had a leadership letdown over an extended period of time in various forms. This is not a yesterday problem.” This is why MOVEE, according to him, speaks directly, “not out of both sides of its mouth, but we owe it to the Liberian people to put in place a government that can deliver the change that they are yearning for.”He assured voters that MOVEE does not want a country in which a small minority is well off while the larger majority lives in abject poverty, adding, “This is why MOVEE wants a government of change that will restore the hope of the Liberian people, which calls for the replacement of the Unity Party from the focal point of leadership come 2017.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Raiders vs. Ravens: 3 things to watch

first_imgDerek Carr’s quest to ruin the Raiders’ chances at the No. 1 pick continues in Baltimore on Sunday, but one of the league’s stiffest defenses stands in his way.The Ravens only allow 300 total yards per game, fewest in the NFL, and their 205.4 passing yards surrendered per game rank second.Baltimore snapped a three-game losing streak with a three-point win over the Bengals last Sunday in rookie quarterback Lamar Jackson’s starting debut, and he’ll get the go again on Sunday against the …last_img read more

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Elie Wiesel Gathers Nobel Laureates to Urge Kansas to Nix ID

first_imgHolocaust survivor Elie Wiesel has gathered 38 Nobel prize winners to join him in urging the Kansas school board to reject their new science standards that question evolution (see 08/11/2005).  According to MSNBC News, their document calls evolution an “indispensable” foundation of biology.  The story was reprinted by LiveScience.com.Odd.  Biology got along just fine without this indispensable foundation for a long time.  In fact, it could be argued that evolution is only a naturalistic facade on a creationist superstructure.  John Ray, Carl Linnaeus, Leeuwenhoek, Pasteur and many others did just fine biologizing without evolution.  Their Christian faith was their motivation to do excellent scientific work.  Had the Nobel prize existed in their day, they certainly would have been among the most distinguished and honored recipients.  Any such lists of authorities are therefore contrived political statements.    What Elie Wiesel endured under the Nazis is horrendous, but it did not have to make him lose his faith and go haywire over evolution.  The faith of Corrie ten Boom and other Holocaust survivors was their beacon of hope despite experiencing the darkness of human evil, and gave direction and purpose to their lives.  Wiesel has dedicated his life to helping people never forget what happened there.  Why then, instead, does he not point to the roots of that evil – the evolutionary ethics rooted in Darwinism that Haeckel took to Germany and spread like a dark evangelist?  How ironic that he would exalt the very foundation of two political ideologies – Nazism and communism – that have caused more inhumane treatment and death than the world has even seen.  Over 100 million deaths in less than a century can be traced to the actions of evolution-inspired dictators, and that doesn’t begin to describe the suffering of many millions more who survived their lies, tortures, brutalities, deprivations, midnight arrests, hard labor camps, gulags, and associated nightmares.    We agree with Wiesel that mankind should never forget, but for even stronger reasons.  Our reasons give moral impetus to the debate over evolution today.  One should not presume that Nazism and communism have exhausted the potential evils inherent in Darwinian thinking.  One only has to think of today’s ethical tensions over stem cells, clones, chimeras, abortion, genetically-engineered humans and other controversies to envision horrors that would make Stalin look like a playground bully (see Apologetics Press for a recent example).  Learning from history is an important start.  That’s why we strongly urge readers to learn twentieth century history, and read accounts of those who survived the brutality of Nazi Germany and endured the unspeakable horrors behind the Iron Curtain.  That such atrocities continue to exist in North Korea, Cuba, China and other communist countries is a stern reminder that there is still much to do to combat this evil at its root.  For a scholarly treatment of the Darwin-based teaching on evolutionary ethics between 1859 and 1932 that fed Hitler’s views on racial policy, read From Darwin to Hitler by historian Richard Weikart.  And since many historians omit the Darwinian assumptions and motivations behind Marx, Engels, Lenin and Stalin, it’s vital to review Jerry Bergman’s paper on “The Darwinian foundation of communism” and first-person works like Solzhenitzen’s The Gulag Archipelago and Wurmbrand’s Tortured for Christ.  A tree is known by its fruit and is fed by its root.    The Kansas school board member rightly said, “I don’t think anything should be taught as dogma.”  The debates over evolution and intelligent design cannot be won by appeals to authority.  Nobel laureates are smart people in their specialties, but that does not make them experts on politics, ethics, education and philosophy.  Look at the dumb things two of them said a couple of years ago (see 08/24/2003); some of their remarks demonstrate that they don’t even know that much about biology, let alone history or logic.  Maybe most of us can’t split an atom or learn how reverse transcription works, but anyone can learn common sense.  How ironic that scientists, supposedly committed to observation and verification by experiment, want us to accept their word on evolution as dogma.(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Special livery

first_imgQantas has painted up its latest Boeing 737-800 in a special colour scheme inspired by the work of the late West Australian Indigenous painter Paddy Bedford.The plane, the airline’s 69th 737-800, is the fourth aircraft with Indigenous livery for Qantas, with over 20 years of Indigenous livery history.The concept is a joint initiative between Qantas, the family and estate of Paddy Bedford, Australian Indigenous design studio Balarinji and the National Gallery of AustraliaQantas will take members of Paddy Bedford’s family and community to Seattle next week to take delivery of this special aircraft.The 737-800 will arrive in Australia on November 11 and AirlineRatings.com will be on board the delivery flight.last_img read more

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Nanotechnology to curb water pollution in mining

first_imgThe mining industry has also become far more water conscious and has begun using water-recovery technology on an industrial scale (Image: Brand SA)• Infographic: Mining in South Africa• Mining groups invested in South Africa • Infographic: Mining robot can save lives • Focus on African resources at Mining Indaba • Scientist gets mine drainage patent Sulaiman PhilipThe problem of acid water draining from abandoned mine dumps and shafts has long seemed insurmountable, with some estimates putting the pollution on the Witwatersrand as high as 350 million litres a day. New technology from Dow Sub-Saharan Africa is finally offering a solution.South Africa is the most industrialised and diverse economy in Africa, wealth built on mining. But while mining’s contribution to South Africa’s GDP has fallen, the industrial base built up around the industry has diversified and strengthened.The historical importance of mining has created not just legacy issues – the ecological disaster of acid mine drainage – but has also strained the country’s water supply. South Africa is a water-scarce country, with its limited resources having to be shared between domestic and industrial – agriculture, mining, power generation – users.Mining techniques have evolved since diamonds were discovered in 1867. There are no canaries in the coal mines and improved ventilation and extraction techniques have made South African mining among the safest in the world. The mining industry has also become far more water conscious and, with the help of companies like Dow Chemicals, has begun using water-recovery technology on an industrial scale.Ross McLean, president of Dow Sub-Saharan Africa, says the web of industries in South Africa makes it possible for the company to provide clients with synchronised services.“Power stations need a certain purity of water in the steam turbines. Today, you can set them up with a supply of recycled water from a mine – we have this kind of system in place in a power station in South Africa. We’ve helped with our technology for the purification of waste water from the mine to a standard where that recycled water can be used in the power station. This creates a green linkage from mining to energy, which of course is a critical sector.” Nanotechnology for water filtrationDow’s world-leading reverse osmosis, nano-filtration membranes and ion-exchange resins allows industry to optimise water management. For McLean the future of mining has to be about sustainability, and water management using Dow technology should be at the forefront of any decisions made about operations.  Karen Dobson, Dow’s global business director for mining, adds that the technology has the benefit of being able to, dependent on the system used, produce safe water with zero discharge.  She says Dow technology can play a greater role in removing heavy metals from aqueous tailing discharges. It also has value in the secondary recovery of valuable metals from tailings and waste streams, helping reduce mining’s environmental impact. “The environment and social pressures are becoming more challenging for the mining industry. These are some of the very problems and challenges facing the industry we believe we can contribute to providing sustainable solutions.”More than a century of mining has left South Africa with mountains of waste – tailings dumps – and networks of abandoned shafts. Shafts on the Witwatersrand are veined with pyrite – an iron sulphide known as “fool’s gold” because of its superficial lustre – which reacts with rainwater and groundwater to decompose into sulphuric acid. Pollution in major water sourcesGeologists estimate that acid drainage from abandoned mines on the Witwatersrand could reach 350-million litres per day. This is untreated water that flows into the watershed of the Vaal and Limpopo Rivers, which supply water to millions of peopleIn 2013 the government budgeted R150-million to deal with acid mine drainage. With 6 000 derelict mines in the country, the World Wide Fund for Nature estimates that South Africa would need to spend R30-billion to solve the problem. “The longer we wait to address this issue, the more it is going to cost the South African taxpayer in the long term,” Deon Nel, head of the WWF’s biodiversity division, told the Mercury in 2013.Dow has been actively marketing its nano- and ultra-filtration membranes as solutions to the legacy problems of the mining industry. Not only can the technology remove harmful components from tailing waters, but it has given birth to a secondary industry recovering valuable metals from tailings and waste streams. It can reclaim metals that were otherwise too expensive to recover while reducing the environmental damage done by mine dumps and abandoned shafts.For Dow, investing in technologies that solve problems like acid mine drainage is an investment in the future of the company. “Business will not be sustainable if we do not get that right,” says McLean.“Our solutions, especially in the mining space, can help deal with the legacy issues that remain after operations cease. Sustainability is at the core of how Dow does business. Not just in terms of how we manufacture products but how we take those products to our customers. It is a philosophy that we share with our customers who are looking to adopt best practice around sustainability.” According to Ross McLean an investment in sustainable technology is an investment in future succes. (Image: Dow Chemicals) Investing in AfricaOn average, the African economy is predicted to grow between 6% and 7% over the next two decades. Despite the forecast growth, just $3 of every $1 000 invested by American companies goes into Africa. For most investors Africa is still the dark continent of terrible headlines.But for companies already on the ground in Africa, like Dow, the continent is a thriving marketplace. Dow brings 117 years of expertise to a region with diverse needs and almost unlimited growth potential. In terms of Dow’s global business, sub-Saharan Africa is a relatively small market but, McLean argues, that market will grow more important as Africa industrialises. “In South Africa you would not say industrialisation, you would say it’s a drive to re-industrialisation – which the government is pushing. We see this market as really interesting because of its level of diversification plays to the variety of solutions we offer.” Dow is expanding in Africa, with offices in Egypt, Ghana, Nigeria, Morocco and Ethiopia.  McLean stresses that it remains a business-to-business company, one that touches most industries in sub-Saharan Africa. The level of diversification in African industry plays to Dow’s strengths and the solutions it can offer as well, McLean says.“Our investment is about putting more people on the ground to bring our technologies to our customers. We have been investing in chemistry, science and technology for 117 years. Deeply embedded in our history is a lot of know-how and technology. We have already invested a lot in the [environmentally sound] solutions and technologies that African industry needs.”McLean admits that each country in which Dow operates in has its unique problems, but the rewards of working in Africa are infinite. “There are some really interesting challenges. But the thing is, companies like us go after opportunities when the opportunity is big enough to warrant the risk. It’s a risk-reward balance; there is no question we see the opportunity for growth. I think we are succeeding.”Dow’s African strategy is the result of eight years of research on business conditions in Africa. And while it conforms to local conditions, the company has adopted a “be local but act global” approach to business. It has created systems to develop African talent and leadership, people who are then immersed in the culture of Dow.“We understand that large multinationals like us can’t really understand African markets until they have feet on the ground. Is Africa challenging?  Yes. You really have to adapt to the situation in each country. You almost need a manual on how to do business in Nigeria, Ghana, Ethiopia and South Africa.“Saying that, we do not compromise our standards around health, safety and the environment in Africa,” says McLean.“It would be far more expensive if we did not maintain our standards and got it wrong.  There are costs associated with doing it right, but we absolutely do not compromise. We’d sooner not do the business than break our own rules. If we businesses get that right, they will succeed in Africa.” Follow the Mining Indaba on social media: •           Twitter.com/MiningIndaba •           Miningindaba.com/Linkedin •           Facebook.com/africanminingindaba •           Youtube.com/Miningindabalast_img read more

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Cinematography Tip: One Take, Two Environments

first_imgOne of the most challenging shots for a DP is a ‘continuous take’ that moves inside and outside within the same shot. These cinematography tips will show you how to do it right.Top Image: Michael Keaton in BirdmanIn recent years the one-take shot has significantly increased in popularity, with more filmmakers than ever attempting to pull off full scenes in this fashion. While the success of films such as Birdman may be at least partly responsible for igniting this trend in the indie filmmaking world, that doesn’t mean you require a Hollywood-level budget to pull it off.The two biggest challenges with one-take shots (and specifically those that transition between interior and exterior) are color temperature and exposure. Of course other elements such as needing to work with a smaller crew, blocking hurdles, focus challenges, etc. are tricky too… But dealing with color temperature and exposure are often the biggest problems filmmakers are faced with.That said, there are a number of ways you can handle both scenarios. These cinematography tips offer solutions for each of these issues:Color TemperatureImage: Still from the famous “one take raid” from True Detective Let’s assume your shot starts outside in the middle of the day, and follows your character as he walks inside a house. Obviously at the start of the shot you’re going to be dealing with a daylight color temperature (5600K or so). As you walk into the home, that temperature will change. There are likely tungsten bulbs (3200K) inside, mixed with window light. This mix will inevitably make it difficult to get a proper white balance in camera.While you may be thinking that you can simply shoot RAW and adjust the white balance in post, it simply doesn’t work that way. Sure, you can keyframe the color temperature as the actor walks inside (to adjust for the tungsten light), but then the daylight coming in through the windows will look neon-blue.The solution in this case is simple: use daylight bulbs inside. Whether you’re using strictly practical lights, or are using proper film lights — if you use daylight-balanced bulbs, then your color temperature issues will vanish. You can even replace household lights with daylight balanced bulbs. HMIs or daylight-balanced LED panels are great options too.ExposureImage: Still from the single-shot “Copa Scene” from Goodfellas.So we’ve solved the color temperature issue, but what about exposure? As you enter the house from outside, the exposure is going to drop significantly and your image will either be really blown out outside or really underexposed inside.There are two ways you can address this, the first of which is by rolling the iris. A good 1st AC/focus puller will be able to do a clean iris pull for you when entering an interior location. This means that much like pulling focus, they’ll literally pull the iris as they enter the new environment with you to open it up.Image: Michael Keaton and Edward Norton filming BirdmanWhile this should work every time (as long as you have a good 1st AC on board), you also don’t want to rely on the iris-pull technique entirely. If this was your only means of exposing the image properly, you’d likely wind up with an image that’s far too stopped down outside (F22) and shallow inside.To compensate for this, I’d always recommend bringing up the base light levels in the house you’re shooting in. This will mean you won’t have to roll the iris nearly as much, which means you’ll be able to retain the right amount of depth of field that serves your creative vision.Got any tips for shooting long takes?  Got any cinematography techniques that could help in a single-shot situation? Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more

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