Court questions Assam’s jumbo transport to Gujarat

first_imgThe Gauhati High Court on Monday asked Assam’s Chief Wildlife Warden Ranjana Gupta whether she had taken note of a 2016 Supreme Court order against transfer of elephants while clearing the transit of four juvenile elephants to Gujarat for a religious event.Hearing separate petitions filed by Kerala-born Canadian Sangita Iyer and Guwahati-based NGO Avinava Prayash, a division Bench comprising acting Chief Justice Arup Kumar Goswami and Justice Manish Choudhury sought clarification from the Centre with regard to the operation of the apex court’s interim order in 2016 prohibiting transfer of elephants outside a State by their possessors.The Bench also asked Ms. Gupta to clarify whether she had taken note of the Supreme Court’s interim order when she authorised on June 12 the transit of the elephants to Ahmedabad’s Jagannath Temple for a Rath Yatra on July 4.The oldest of the four elephants — females Joytara and Rani, and males Babulal and Rupsing — is nine years old. ‘Will not survive trip’Wildlife activists had argued that these juvenile elephants would not survive the heatwave while travelling in a metal railway wagon 3,106 km from eastern Assam’s Tinsukia to Ahmedabad.Noting that the railways too had sought clarification on the Supreme Court’s interim order before transporting the elephants, the Bench referred to the March 8 letter of the Project Elephant Division of the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change seeking legal steps for the “welfare of the captive elephants, etc., and strict monitoring” to prevent illegal transport of elephants between States.The petitioners’ counsel Bhaskar Dev Konwar, argued that the elephants would face adverse climatic conditions during their train journey to Gujarat.He also pointed out that unlike Tamil Nadu and Kerala, Assam has not framed rules for management and maintenance of captive elephants under Section 64(2) of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. He also contended that none of the elephants sent outside Assam on temporary leases have returned till date. The case is scheduled to come up for hearing again on Tuesday.last_img read more

Read More

Traveler’s diarrhea diet

first_imgDefinitionTravelers diarrhea is loose, watery stools. People can get travelers diarrhea when they visit places where the water is not clean or the food is not handled safely. This can include third-world or developing countries in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.This article tells you what you should eat or drink if you have travelers diarrhea.Alternative NamesDiet – travelers diarrhea; Diarrhea – travelers – dietFunctionBacteria and other substances in the water and food can cause travelers diarrhea. People who live these areas dont often get sick because their bodies are used to the bacteria.You can lower your risk for getting travelers diarrhea by avoiding water, ice, and food that may be contaminated. The goal of the travelers diarrhea diet is to make your symptoms better and prevent you from getting dehydrated.Side EffectsTravelers diarrhea is rarely dangerous in adults. It can be more serious in children.RecommendationsHow to prevent travelers diarrhea:WATER AND OTHER DRINKSDo not use tap water to drink or brush your teeth.Do not use ice made from tap water.Use only boiled water (boiled for at least 5 minutes) for mixing baby formula.For infants, breastfeeding is the best and safest food source. However, the stress of traveling may reduce the amount of milk you make.Drink only pasteurized milk.Drink bottled drinks if the seal on the bottle hasnt been broken.Sodas and hot drinks are usually safe.FOODDo not eat raw fruits and vegetables unless you peel them. Wash all fruits and vegetables before eating them.Do not eat raw leafy vegetables (e.g. lettuce, spinach, cabbage) because they are hard to clean.Do not eat raw or rare meats.Avoid shellfish.Do not buy food from street vendors.Eat hot, well-cooked foods. Heat kills the bacteria. But do not eat hot foods that have been sitting around for a long time.WASHINGadvertisementWash hands often.Watch children carefully so they do not put things in their mouths or touch dirty items and then put their hands in their mouths.If possible, keep infants from crawling on dirty floors.Check to see that utensils and dishes are clean.There is no vaccine against travelers diarrhea.Your doctor may recommend medicines to help lower your chances of getting sick.Taking two tablets of Pepto-Bismol four times a day before you travel and while you are traveling can help prevent diarrhea. Do not take Pepto-Bismol for more than 3 weeks.Most people do not need to take antibiotics every day to prevent diarrhea while traveling.People who are at risk for more dangerous infections (because chronic bowel diseases, kidney disease, cancer, diabetes, or HIV) should talk to their doctor before traveling.A prescription medicine called rifaximin can also help prevent travelers diarrhea. Ask your doctor if this medicine is right for you.If you have diarrhea, follow these tips to help you feel better:Drink 8 to 10 glasses of clear fluids every day. Water or an oral rehydration solution is best.Drink at least 1 cup of liquid every time you have a loose bowel movement.Eat small meals every few hours instead of three big meals.Eat some salty foods, such as pretzels, soup, and sports drinks.Eat foods that are high in potassium, such as bananas, potatoes without the skin, and fruit juices.Dehydration means your body does not have as much water and fluids as it should. It is a very big problem for children or people who are in a hot climate. Signs of severe dehydration include:Decreased urine (fewer wet diapers in infants)Dry mouthSunken eyesFew tears when cryingGive your child fluids for the first 4 – 6 hours. At first, try 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of fluid every 30 to 60 minutes.You can use an over-the-counter drink, such as Pedialyte or Infalyte. Do not add water to these drinks.You can also try Pedialyte popsicles.Fruit juice or broth with water added to it may also help. These drinks can give your child important minerals that are being lost in the diarrhea.If you are breastfeeding your infant, keep doing it. If you are using formula, use it at half-strength for two to three feedings after the diarrhea starts. Then you can begin regular formula feedings.In developing countries, many health agencies stock packets of salts to mix with water. If these fluids are not available, you can make an emergency solution by mixing:1/2 teaspoon of salt2 tablespoons sugar or rice powder1/4 teaspoon potassium chloride (salt substitute)1/2 teaspoon trisodium citrate (can be replaced with baking soda)1 liter of clean waterGet medical help right away if you or your child has symptoms of severe dehydration, or if you have a fever or bloody stools.advertisementReferencesArguin P. Approach to the patient before and after travel. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 294.Basnyat B, Ericsson CD. Travel medicine. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2011:chap 84.Review Date:2/9/2014Reviewed By:Daniel Levy, MD, PhD, Infectious Diseases, Lutherville Personal Physicians, Lutherville, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more

Read More