Montague pleased with first-day execution

first_imgChairman of the organising committee for the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships, Colleen Montague, says she was pleased with the execution of the first day of the five-day championships, currently taking place inside the National Stadium. Montague admitted some disappointment that spectators continue to shun the opening day of the championships despite the free admittance, but believes there are some positive signs as she looks forward to another successful staging of the event. “Things are going very well, everyone has carried out their part, it was an amazing effort on everyone’s part to ensure that everything was in place for today (yesterday),” Montague told The Gleaner. “We had some very minor hiccups, but we are pleased with where we are. “We know that each day is different. Tomorrow (today) brings another complexion because all the schools will be out, and by Friday, the spectators will all be out, so every day brings a different aspect to Champs, and we just take it day by day,” Montague added. “We take it year by year, and what we have been seeing on all of the days is a vast improvement over a few years ago. We are taking it step by step, and we are working with all of our stakeholders. In a few years we will see even more improvements on these days,” she said. The Wolmer’s Girls’ School principal was also disappointed that the demand for grandstand tickets could not be met, but reminded fans that there will be an opportunity to watch the event on big screen outside the National Stadium’s main gate on Saturday. “We are very unhappy that we are unable to satisfy the demands of so many persons who want to be here with us,” Montague said. “We will be having a screen outside for persons who come and aren’t able to get inside, they will be able to view it and experience it there.”last_img read more

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Kaymer wins Nedbank Golf Challenge

first_imgAfter a sub-standard year, Kaymer showed much improved form in the South African Open in mid-November, finishing third to record his best result of 2012 before Sunday’s victory at the famous resort in South Africa’s North West province. 3 December 2012 Under 69 twiceChampions Challenge winner Bernhard Langer went under 69 twice, posting rounds of 68 and 67 before closing with a 74, but that was still good enough for a two-shot win over Jay Haas, father of Bill. ‘I never felt that I had it won’ Over parThe rest of the field finished over par. Paul Lawrie, the leader at halfway on four-under 140, ended on one-over 289 after closing with rounds of 75 and 74. “I never felt that I had it won,” he admitted afterwards in an interview on the green. “At the tee on 18, I knew I had a two-shot lead, like Bernhard Langer had on Saturday in the Champions Challenge. “I felt comfortable then, and obviously when I stepped onto the green, but Charl [Schwartzel] had a really good round of golf. Louis [Oosthuizen] played well too, but was a little unlucky here and there,” he added. As Kaymer alluded to, Germany did the double, as Langer landed the senior title. Sunshine Tour Order of Merit winner Garth Mulroy brought up the rear with a total of nine-over-par 297. Germany’s Martin Kaymer succeeded Lee Westwood as champion, winning the US$5-million Nedbank Golf Challenge champion at the Gary Player Country Club in Sun City on Sunday. It was his first win of the season. Third place went to Bill Haas on three-under 285, followed by Louis Oosthuizen on two-under 286, after he slipped to a final round two-over 74, and defending champion Lee Westwood on one-under 287.center_img Throughout the tournament, 69 was the lowest round recorded, and it was achieved just six times by six players. Last year’s champion, Mark Calcavecchia, was in the running after the first two rounds, posting 71 and 69, but fell apart over the last 18 holes, carding a terrible 13-over-par 85 to slip to second last on the leaderboard. Francesco Molinari’s challenge was spoilt by a 78 in the third round and he finished on two-over 290, alongside Carl Pettersson, who, like the Italian, also closed with a three-under 69. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Justin Rose really struggled with his game, posting three rounds over par, including a horrible 79 in the second round, to end on seven-over 295. Peter Hanson, after opening with a level-par 72, followed those up with three 73s in succession to finish in ninth on three-over-par 291. Only Kaymer and Schwartzel managed four rounds of par or less as the course played tough. The German went around in 72, 69, 70 and 69 to finish on eight-under 280 to finish two shots clear of Schwartzel, who posted rounds of 72, 71, 70 and 69. ‘Thanks for the pressure’“I’ve been in the lead a few times in my career, but this time when Bernhard won, the German media was writing about the German double and you guys [the commentators] talked about it all the time. When Bernhard won, he mentioned it in his speech. You guys mentioned it a few times on TV, so thanks for the pressure,” he joked. His winning total, eight-under-par 280, was the highest since Jim Furyk’s win on six-under in 2005, but the course plays differently in different conditions and with different pin placements, so direct comparisons cannot be made. Not that Kaymer would care after he won for the first time since he lifted the WGC-HSBC Champions title in November 2011.last_img read more

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Reftract House: A 2009 Solar Decathlon Contender

first_imgIt would be understandable if participants in the Solar Decathlon feel the pressure of rising expectations – pressure to outdo the work of previous teams of faculty and students who have already put enormous energy and analysis into the 800-sq.-ft. net-zero-energy dwellings that became their Decathlon entries.The Santa Clara University undergraduates who make up one of the 20 teams competing in the 2009 Solar Decathlon, for example, might even feel a little extra pressure to measure up to SCU’s performance in the 2007 Decathlon, where the team entered the competition as an underdog but ended up winning third place overall.The good news is that, competitive as it is, the Decathlon also is an excellent teaching tool whose past entries can be analyzed, and improved upon, by current contestants.To that end, SCU, located in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Santa Clara, has been developing its entry for the 2009 Decathlon in collaboration with design, art, and architecture students at the nearby California College of the Arts.The SCU/CCA team aims to produce a “bold and luxurious home that demonstrates green living does not require a compromise in lifestyle,” the team says in its mission statement about the project.Called Refract House, the project derives it name from the notion that the SCU/CCA team is attempting to alter the path of net-zero-energy home design for the better, an idea that’s represented visually by the building’s bent-tube layout and technically by the way its layout controls the entry of light into the home as it wraps around a central courtyard.Ramping up for OctoberConstruction of the house is well underway, and the team has been busy not only overseeing the process but escorting visitors on tours of the building site, which is on the SCU campus. (Tour hours are noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 3 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; call (845) 323-8029 for information.)Of course, the Refract House’s big moment will be at the Solar Decathlon, scheduled for October 8 through 18 in Washington, D.C., where the home will be reconstructed on the National Mall, along with 19 other fully operational contest entries, for viewing by visitors and judges.Each Solar Decathlon team competes in 10 areas: architecture (for a maximum of 100 points), market viability (100 points), engineering (100 points), lighting design (75 points), communications (75 points), comfort zone (100 points), hot water (100 points), appliances (100 points), home entertainment (100 points), and the newest category, net metering (150 points).The 2009 field of competitors includes 16 teams from schools in the U.S., two from Canadian universities, and two from European universities.A biennial event sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Decathlon attracted a record 200,000 visitors in 2007. The house built for that contest by SCU, which doesn’t have an architecture school, did not do well in the architecture category. But it did land perfect scores in the hot water and energy balance categories, and ended up with a total of 979.959 points out of a possible 1,200 (the first-place winner, the team representing Technische Universität Darmstadt, scored 1,024.855 points).Decathlon teams play with their hearts as well as their heads. The DOE’s Decathlon website points out that SCU’s 2007 entry almost didn’t make it to the National Mall when the truck transporting the house broke an axle on its way to Washington. The house’s arrival was delayed by three days, but the SCU persevered.last_img read more

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