Xtreme Muzik Tour with Big & Rich and Gretchen Wilson

first_imgGet ready for Xtreme Muzik the Tour, Saturday September 24 at the EnCana Events Centre. Xtreme Muzik – the Tour is coming to Dawson Creek and the EnCana Events Centre on Saturday September 24thThe tour features Big and Rich, Gretchen Wilson, Cowboy Troy and Two Foot Fred.- Advertisement -Sharing one eight-piece band on a custom stage that includes, of course, a fully-operational bar as the centerpiece, the unique show will offer something to fans rarely seen in modern touring – the co-headliners will rarely leave the stage. The music will not stop, as Big & Rich and Gretchen perform hit after hit and often join in on each other’s songs.Tickets will go on Sale Friday May 27 at 10 a.m.  You can get tickets by calling 1-877-339-TIXX or online at www.dawsonco-optickets.comListen to Moose FM all this week for your chance to beat the box office.   Plus, if you sign up to be a fan of Moose FM on Facebook, you’ll get the chance to buy tickets before anyone else. Just visit, facebook.com/moosefm and like the page.Tickets will be $80.99 or $68.89 a piece.Advertisementlast_img read more

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What Business Leaders Can Learn from Professional Sports

first_imgHow to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … AI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Them While leading a business doesn’t indicate anything about one’s athleticism, both athletes and entrepreneurs draw from a similar set of skills in order to achieve the same end: a cohesive, peak-performance team.Much of what athletes accomplish on the field has more to do with their mindset than bodies. Over the years, I’ve worked with a number of athletes — including members of the Miami Dolphins — to help develop focus, mentally sharpen, and read the lightning-fast signals their bodies send to their brains. Peak performance coaching has become a popular way for pro sports teams to improve their team’s drive — both individually and within groups — before problems crop up.As it turns out, businesses can do the same. There are several ways leaders can approach their teams so their teams are aligned, functioning at their best and accomplishing set goals.  1. Paint a picture that inspires unity.At a time when 80 percent of businesses aren’t tracking their goals and — unsurprisingly — a nearly equal 77 percent haven’t achieved their company visions, it pays to articulate an organization’s goals and keep them at the top of everyone’s mind. Unifying a team around a common goal can be exceedingly difficult, but it’s paramount to success. Whether chasing a Super Bowl ring or a bigger share of the marketplace, it’s a leader’s responsibility to paint a picture of success that’s so compelling that everyone wants to burn rubber to make it happen.While some believe an entire company needs to come to a consensus before rallying behind a particular goal, those in the sports world would disagree. Coaches and players understand that they’re all there to win a championship, but the head coach determines the content of the playbook they follow in order to make that happen.Business leaders can adopt the same mentality, taking feedback when necessary and appropriate, but ultimately leading the team toward a unifying goal and, subsequently, supporting team members in their efforts to reach it. Painting a picture that provides context for why that goal matters goes a long way in helping others visualize their role within the larger team landscape and setting the tone for true collaboration.  2. Make sure every role on the team serves a purpose for the whole.One of the more interesting components to football is just how diverse the individual players are across the team, namely in terms of role and physicality. For example, a wide receiver has a vastly different skill set than a punter — one is relied upon for his agility and remarkably sticky fingers, while the other has a highly specialized ability to keep a ball suspended in air with a tap of his foot. While they have different natural — and trained — abilities to fill that role and, in most cases, never play on the field at the same time, they’re nonetheless unified by the same guiding principles: train hard, play harder, winner takes all. When empowered to play to their strengths within their given role and under a larger unifying goal, magic starts to happen; we start to see a true team form.  Interestingly, Gallup’s “State of the American Workforce” report determined that playing up strengths, rather than trying to shore up weaknesses, made teams nearly 13 percent more productive. Those who use their strengths on a daily basis are six times more likely to be engaged — and retained. It comes as no surprise that in order to gain those same benefits seen on the football field, business leaders must assess their team members’ strengths to determine how they can work in concert with others with the greater mission in view.Unlike in football, however, when it’s often obvious where a player’s strength lies, it’s not always obvious what a team member’s true strength is and how it can be leveraged in a business setting — sometimes, their strengths can actually be best utilized outside the scope of their designated role. For example, a graphic designer might have valuable insights in developing new product designs and packaging traditionally handled by the R&D team, or a data entry specialist with a knack for processes may be able to find a way to streamline an existing process for another team. It’s important to remember that building a successful organization is dependent upon, among other things, a leader’s ability to recognize talent when and wherever she sees it.3. Cultivate a growth mindset among your teammates.I’m a big believer in the growth mindset. People with a fixed mindset believe their skills were given to them at birth, and they have a finite amount of talent: They’re either good at something or they’re not. Growth-oriented people, however, believe that they can hone the skills they already possess as well as acquire and develop new skills and abilities.Similar to the student who never studies for tests because of the “I either know it or I don’t” mindset, many players who are natural-born athletes exhibit similar attitudes. If they’re not good at a certain skill on the first try, they default to their original, seemingly more successful tactics or give up trying the new skill altogether. But as Tom Brady of the New England Patriots has proven, that’s not how players become successful. Well-known for his will-over-skill mindset, he emphasizes his strengths and knows that practice transforms his adequate natural skills into honed, unbeatable  techniques — and, unsurprisingly, it’s brought him more Super Bowl rings than any other quarterback. He isn’t afraid to fail in a relatively safe environment if it means he increases his chances to succeed when and where it matters. A growth mindset encourages people to try new things and risk failure when appropriate. Businesses that focus on perfection automatically inhibit their people from realizing their own, and ultimately the company’s, potential — they’ll never try because they’re afraid to fail. The end result of stifled efforts, of course, is a stagnant company. Rewarding new attempts, regardless of their outcome, develops outlets for innovative thinking and empowers people to take charge, moving their team past a fixed mindset.By developing a strong unit that comes together under a common goal, even when things aren’t easy, leaders and organizations can accomplish just about anything — whether it’s winning a championship or becoming their industry’s top performer. Related Posts How to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio… Tags:#growth#Leadership#purpose#Sports Curt Cronin A former Navy SEAL, Curt Cronin is the co-founder and CEO of Ridgeline Partners, where he capitalizes on his combined experiences and lessons from the military, academic, and business worlds to advise numerous organizations, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to niche startups, on how to catalyze an exponential culture of execution and innovation. How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi…last_img read more

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Consumers Urged to Settle Disputes Through Newly Established CPT

first_imgStory Highlights The tribunal’s establishment will “significantly increase consumers’ confidence in the system of redress.” The CPT is one of several provisions of the Consumer Protection (Amendment) Act, 2012 The CPT provides an alternative for aggrieved consumers to file claims in an easy, affordable and timely manner Persons with unresolved issues relating to transactions with goods and service providers are being encouraged to utilize the services of the newly established Consumer Protection Tribunal (CPT), to reach settlements, particularly through mediation facilitated by the Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC).This urging comes from State Minister for Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Sharon Ffolkes-Abrahams, who explains that the CPT provides an alternative for aggrieved consumers to file claims in an easy, affordable and timely manner, rather than resorting to the courts, which could result in protracted delays and costs.The CPT, which was established earlier this year, is one of several provisions of the Consumer Protection (Amendment) Act, 2012, which incorporates a slate of revisions to the Consumer Protection Act, 2005.Speaking at the CAC’s Consumer Protection Act (CPA) sensitization workshop, at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, on September 18, Mrs. Ffolkes-Abrahams argued that the tribunal’s establishment will “significantly increase consumers’ confidence in the system of redress.”She said the CAC’s expanded authority and the redress mechanisms now established under the amended CPA, will “significantly impact how consumer complaints are handled from now on.”In addition to the CPT’s establishment, other provisions under the amended CPA include: empowering the CAC to keep proper records of all complaints and actions taken and initiate investigations of breaches, where deemed necessary; levying applicable criminal sanctions; and sanctioning mandatory refunding of payments with applicable interest to consumers where purchasers elect not to accept goods not delivered within specified timelines advertised by providers.Mrs. Ffolkes-Abrahams said in the CPT’s establishment, “we now have a quasi judicial body” bearing the “characteristics and powers” of a court. She pointed out that the CPT’s functions will be distinctly different from the CAC’s investigative and administrative authority, while assuring that, should the need arise, consumers can seek redress in a court, should they deem the CPT’s ruling unsatisfactory.“All of this is in keeping with the Ministry’s mandate to promote and protect the rights of the Jamaican consumer. We remain committed, therefore, to implementing programmes and strategies to increase consumer confidence in the business environment and in the legislative framework, as we continue to protect the rights and improve the welfare of Jamaican consumers,” the State Minister assured.These, she outlined, include: regularly reviewing and modernizing consumer protection laws; ensuring effective redress for aggrieved consumers; and empowering citizens to become more informed and responsible consumers through better information and more education.The seven-member Consumer Protection Tribunal, consisting of four women and three men, is chaired by retired Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), and current Professor of Law at the University of Technology (UTech), Kent Pantry, Q.C.Its members, who were appointed by Industry, Investment and Commerce Minister, Hon. Anthony Hylton, comprise representatives who are qualified, knowledgeable, and experienced in the areas of law, economics, consumer affairs, telecommunications, information technology, business, accounting, and public administration.Wednesday’s workshop, held under the theme: ‘The CPA and You: Balancing Business Responsibility and Consumer Protection’, was attended by a wide cross section of private and public sector representatives, drawn from finance and banking, law, utilities, as well as non-governmental organizations (NGOs).last_img read more

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Ontario teen charged for allegedly making online threat against US high school

first_imgA 14-year-old girl from Ontario has been charged for allegedly making online threats against a high school in the United States.Const. Natalie Lang with the Brantford, Ont., police says the girl was arrested Tuesday night and charged with uttering threats to cause bodily harm or death.She says the threat was made in an Instagram post that threatened a school in Hanover, N.H., and mentioned a shooting.Lang says the girl, who cannot be named under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, will be prosecuted in Canada.The girl appeared in court Wednesday for a bail hearing.Police say officers executed a search warrant at a home in Brantford and seized electronic devices.“Yes, she has been charged … but co-operation between our detectives in the major crime unit and the Hanover Police Department is still ongoing,” Lang said in an interview Wednesday.Both Canadian and U.S. officials said they were unaware of any link between the Ontario teen and the community of Hanover, but have not ruled it out.Hanover police Lt. Scott Rathburn said the force took the latest incident involving the Ontario teen “seriously.”“Our investigation lead us, through a search back of the IP used to send the message, to a location in Brantford and we then contacted police there,” Rathburn said.Extra security was brought into the school, he added, and they will be there throughout the week.“We will continue making regular contact with the school and also keep in touch with school officials so we can share as much information as we can with them to determine what their security needs will be in the future.”The alleged threat came a day after Ontario’s provincial police charged five tweens and teens with making online threats against schools in the province. Police reported a spike in similar online threats in the weeks since the massacre at a Florida high school last month in which 14 students and three teachers were killed.OPP Sgt. Peter Leon told The Canadian Press on Tuesday that Instagram is among the platforms where threats have popped up, and he suspected some might be making such posts in an effort to gain followers.Experts have said online threats tend to spike after high-profile school shootings.Aimee Morrison, a professor of digital media at the University of Waterloo, also said Tuesday that some teens make threats on social media in an attempt to gain notoriety and garner a larger following.— With files from Nicole Thompson and Michelle McQuiggelast_img read more

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Player of the Year not the right award for Turner

Evan Turner will not win the Naismith Player of the Year award.The college basketball award is not equivalent to the NBA Most Valuable Player award, which is why Ohio State’s junior guard will not win.There is no doubt that Turner would be on a short list for an MVP award. That can be supported by Ohio State’s record during his injury absence compared to when he’s been on the floor.However, he is not the best player in the nation. He can’t go onto a court and dominate the game regardless of what opposing defenses do to try to stop him, like other players around the country can.Turner cannot do what Kentucky guard John Wall can do with the ball by manipulating defenses to his liking to score or dish it to a teammate.Turner cannot do what Connecticut guard Jerome Dyson can do by scoring every way possible against the then-No.1  ranked team in the country, Texas.Even Notre Dame center Luke Harangody has a case to make with his 24.7 points per game, good for second in the nation.Yes, Turner is the best in the Big Ten, with the only competition coming from Michigan State guard Kalin Lucas and Purdue forward Robbie Hummel. Also, Turner should get a lot of recognition for his talent and his importance to OSU, who fell from the Top 25 without him. He will be an All-American at the very least and will most likely garner other accolades as well.For those who believe Turner should get the Player of the Year award as if it were based solely on a player’s value to his team, I have one name for you: Wayne Chism.The senior forward from Tennessee has not endured more pain than Turner, but his team endured a bigger loss than the Buckeyes.When OSU lost Turner, it lost its best player for a few games and anticipated his comeback so it could make the NCAA Tournament.In Tennessee, the team lost four of its players, including Tyler Smith, because of an off-the-court incident that involved their arrest. Soon after, the team indefinitely suspended those players.Chism picked up right where Smith left off and became the leader of the Volunteers, who went on to beat No.1 Kansas and No. 23 Mississippi since their dismissal.Therefore, the main case Turner had for winning the Naismith Award instead favors Chism. There is a lot of basketball yet to play and this could all change, but the fact is that the Naismith Award is for the Player of the Year, not the Most Valuable Player. read more

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Baseball Noah West out for season with knee injury

Ohio State junior Noah West (8) runs towards third base as he scores the first run of the game against the Lipscomb Bison on March 15, 2019 at Bill Davis Stadium. Credit: Sal Marandino | For The LanternOhio State junior shortstop Noah West will be sidelined with a season-ending knee injury, head coach Greg Beals announced Thursday. West had been a late scratch from Tuesday’s lineup against Northern Kentucky.“He is going to have surgery next week, and we’ve got to adjust our infield defense accordingly,” Beals said. The adjustment, according to Beals, will be to move freshman third baseman Zach Dezenzo over to shortstop, which is where he played Thursday. This will open up the door for freshman infielder Nick Erwin and freshman infielder Marcus Ernst to receive playing time at third base. West was hitting .284 on the season with 9 RBIs. read more

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Southgate happy for Liverpools success

first_imgLiverpool made it to the Champions League final this season and it is considered to be a huge success for the whole English football – and Gareth Southgate believes that it will lift the national team as well.The Albion manager insisted that it is always great to have some experienced players in the squad and thanks to this journey, the Liverpool players were able to gain a lot of experience which they can now use while representing their country.Southgate spoke about this Liverpool’s success as he said, according to Independent:“I think it is big.”divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“We want our players to be playing in those big matches and the experience for the likes of Henderson, Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Lallana and Trent in the last few months of playing in those matches that matter.”“It was the same for the Spurs boys and Man City boys – you want them in those big-match environments.”“You want them to experience winning things because then they know what it has taken, the commitment that is needed and the mindset that is needed and that hurdles can be overcome and they have gained belief from being in those performances.”last_img read more

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Here are the top car stories at CES 2019

first_img Share your voice Reimagining the cockpit Ten years ago, CES’ automotive hall was all about speakers and stereos, but 2019 sees automakers and media providers completely reimagining what entertainment in car looks like. Audi collaborated with Disney on a project called Holoride, a VR experience for passengers that brings games and movies along for the ride. Meanwhile, Intel and WB’s AR cockpit is an augmented reality autonomous car experience that takes riders on a virtual tour of Batman’s Gotham City. Intel and Warner Bros. immersive entertainmentEntertainment might get a whole lot more immersive in future autonomous vehicles. Intel Speaking of augmented reality, suppliers like WayRay and Valeo are busy working on ways to bring AR tech to the cars of today. Valeo’s XtraVue invisible towing system uses cameras to make a towed trailer appear transparent when viewed through an in-car display. Meanwhile, WayRay’s massive head-up display tech enables AR data to be overlaid on to a vehicle’s windshield. A different side of autonomous tech The lion’s share of CES 2019’s car-related news fell to autonomous and semiautonomous technologies that aim to make tomorrow’s vehicles safer. The flashiest was BMW’s self-riding motorbike, which was able to steer itself around the convention center’s lot without falling over. We also saw how autonomy will affect the trucking and logistics industries. Freightliner showed off a Level 2 semiautonomous trailer cab that brings many of the modern advanced driver aid features from passenger cars to semi trucks. 0 CES 2019 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tags 2:25 Post a comment 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value The concepts of tomorrow Forward-looking CES had no shortage of interesting concept cars, a few of which we’ve already seen before. Mercedes-Benz’s Vision Urbanetic concept made its North American debut on the Las Vegas Strip. Roadshow was there to take it for a spin — or rather, be taken for a spin in this autonomous car. Uber talked quite a bit about its plans for flying taxis at its Elevate conference series in 2018. CES 2019 gave many their first in-person look at what to expect from that with the Bell Nexus flying taxi concept. It looks a bit like a big ol’ drone with seating for four passengers and a pilot and it could be taking to the air for test flights in early 2020. I’ve saved the “Where we’re going, we don’t need roads” reference for perhaps the weirdest concept at the show. Hyundai’s Elevate concept is an electric emergency response vehicle with legs between its body and wheels. Able to transition between driving and walking modes, it’s a crazy future ambulance that can scramble over rocky terrain like some kind of lizard car. CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. TVs of CES: Huge 8K screens and insane roll-up OLEDs. 10 life-changing things I learned at CES 2019 At a smaller scale, startup Udelv debuted its second-generation autonomous delivery truck. The Udelv Newton has a longer range and is more flexible than the Udelv’s previous truck and will be hitting the road this year as part of pilot delivery programs with Walmart in Arizona and XL Parts in Texas. And that’s just scratching the surface. There’s so much more to discover in our coverage of CES 2019 and more to come as we wrap up our coverage of the big show and roll straight into the Detroit Auto Show next week. BMW’s riderless, self-driving motorcycle goes for a spin…center_img 56 Photos Though many come for the insane TV tech, smart appliances and cute robots, CES 2019 is also the first major car show of the year. Transportation and mobility steals a little bit more of the show every year with more vehicle debuts, more crazy concepts and more tech finding its way into the cars. To bring you up to speed, here’s a quick roundup of the best automotive news we’ve seen here in Las Vegas. New vehicle debuts CES saw the debut of the long-awaited, long-range version of Nissan’s Leaf EV. The 2019 Leaf E+ tweaks the world’s best-selling electric car formula with a larger battery pack that bumps its range to about 226 miles, a significant boost over the current model. Meanwhile, Mercedes-Benz debuted its coupe-y, swoopy 2020 CLA-Class in Las Vegas this week. The compact sedan is packed with style, but bursting at the seams with tech, including Benz’s MBUX connected infotainment system and a healthy dose of driver aid technologies. (A bit of a power bump over the A-Class doesn’t hurt, either.) Byton Electric car startup Byton only debuted part of the production version of its M-Byte electric SUV, but it’s arguably the most exciting and contentious part. The M-Byte production cockpit features a massive 48-inch screen — that’s as large as seven iPads — and a touchscreen in the center of the steering wheel. We expect to see the rest of the car later this year. CES 2019: We take a ride in the Mercedes-Benz Vision… Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 1:30 All the cool car stuff at CES 2019 11 Photos Now playing: Watch this: More From Roadshow Auto Tech Concept Cars Intel Mercedes-Benz Nissan Self-driving carslast_img read more

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For Texas DACA Recipients Court Ruling Is A Small Win — But

first_imgLexey SwallTomas Martinez, with GLAHR, a grass roots organization from Atlanta, chants to excite the crowd in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 18, 2016.Like many other immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, Carolina Ramirez celebrated this week after a federal judge moved to temporarily preserve a program that protects immigrants like her.But the Houston resident and her allies were cautious with their joy. The fight for the program remains on Capitol Hill, Ramirez said. “I just need Congress to get things together,” she said. “They just need to really hold the line and make sure the deportations don’t continue to happen.”Ramirez, 28, has called Texas home for 20 years. She’s a recipient of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The program, which awards its recipients with renewable, two-year work permits and deportation reprieves, has been targeted for elimination under the administration of President Donald Trump. But those plans were at least paused thanks to a nationwide preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Tuesday.Alsup ordered the program to remain in place during a lawsuit filed by the state of California that argues that the current administration failed to follow the law when Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the announcement to rescind DACA on Sep. 5.“[The injunction] shows the courts agree with protecting immigrant youth,” Ramirez said. “DACA is more than a paper to me.”There are nearly 690,000 recipients in the United States. More than 120,000 live in Texas, meaning the program is especially important for the state. Ramirez stressed that the court’s decision was a temporary solution, rather than a permanent one for DACA recipients. The real fight, she said, will be in Washington, where members of Congress need to “feel the pressure” to make a deal before the Jan. 19 deadline for a government funding bill.On Tuesday, Trump met with Democratic and Republican lawmakers to discuss the future of DACA, and said he wanted a “clean bill” to protect DACA recipients. Later, he added he still wanted an overhaul of immigration policy, which includes his much-desired border wall. Leaders of both parties agreed they’d like to reach a deal that protects undocumented childhood arrivals and strengthens border security. A bipartisan bill “will provide a discreet solution to the crisis that Trump created when he ended DACA on Sept. 5th,” said Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center.“The communities want it, the majority of Americans want it — even legislators on both sides of the aisle have said that they want it and they understand and recognize it needs to get done in January. Congress has a real solution in front of them.”Adrian Reyna, DREAM Act campaign director of the national advocacy group United We Dream, is also a DACA recipient. Reyna said he received a call from his sister Wednesday morning. She asked him if everything was fixed because of the injunction.Unfortunately, he said, it wasn’t. There was still work left to do.“The devil is in the details — of course not everything is fixed,” he said. Meanwhile, Raymund Paredes, Texas commissioner of higher education, told reporters in a phone call Wednesday morning that DACA remains a critical issue for students in the state.“We have tens of thousands of students who fit in the DACA category,” Paredes said. “The United States is their country. A lot of these kids, these young people, don’t remember living anywhere else.”In June, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, along with officials from nine other states, wrote a letter to the Trump administration urging officials to end the DACA program.Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn told reporters Wednesday morning that the federal injunction wouldn’t impact the bipartisan negotiations. Still, he said Tuesday’s court decision was wrong.“If President Obama can create the deferred action program, then certainly President Trump can un-create it, or end it. It just makes sense,” Cornyn said, according to The Hill.Ramirez will be watching closely. She said the past several months have brought a surge in young people coming together to help save DACA. Her personal fight won’t stop because of the recent ruling.“I’ve been able to dedicated my time fully to the future of my community,” Ramirez said. “I feel a lot of energy and a lot of love for my community.” Disclosure: Raymund Paredes has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune. A complete list of Tribune donors and sponsors can be viewed here.  Sharelast_img read more

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The 10 Events You Need To Know To Understand The AlmostFiring Of

first_imgJ. Scott Applewhite/APRobert Mueller is sworn in on Capitol Hill, prior to testifying before the House Judiciary Committee in 2013.President Trump’s reported order last summer to fire Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller is all about obstruction of justice — whether it happened, and whether it could be proven.Trump ordered White House counsel Don McGahn to fire Mueller in June, as The New York Times reported on Thursday. McGahn refused, and threatened to quit. Trump backed off.Speaking to reporters Friday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Trump dismissed the report. “Fake news. Fake news,” the president said in brief remarks as he entered the conference hall. “Typical New York Times. Fake stories.”And prior to leaving for Davos, the president had told reporters he was willing to talk to Mueller’s investigators under oath. Trump said he was “looking forward to it.” At the time, the president also said “There’s been no collusion whatsoever. There’s no obstruction whatsoever.”Still, due to the events of the past year, “it now appears likely that Mueller will conclude that Trump obstructed justice,” wrote former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti on Friday. Here’s the chain of events that led to now:1. Mike Flynn liesFormer national security adviser Michael Flynn is at the center of the Russia imbroglio.In January 2017, Flynn separately tells soon-to-be Vice President Mike Pence and FBI investigators about conversations he had with then-Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak earlier in the presidential transition, saying that the conversations were not related to U.S. sanctions on Russia.Pence goes on TV and repeats those claims, but the FBI, which was monitoring the Russian ambassador’s communications, knew they weren’t true. Flynn has since pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is cooperating with Mueller’s investigators.2. Sally Yates sounds the alarmOn Jan. 26, then-acting Attorney General Sally Yates meets with White House counsel McGahn to warn him the Justice Department had evidence, via the FBI surveillance, that what Pence was saying publicly was inaccurate.She adds that because Russian diplomatic and intelligence officials also knew about the content of the conversations — and probably had their own proof of them — Flynn was vulnerable to blackmail.“To state the obvious, you don’t want your national security adviser compromised by the Russians,” she later told Congress.Four days later, and after a second meeting between McGahn and Yates, Trump fires Yates. The reason given by the White House was her decision to instruct Justice Department attorneys not to defend his immigration restrictions. But subsequent events raise the question about whether Yates’ dismissal also was connected to the unwelcome visit she paid on McGahn.Either way, McGahn told Trump that Flynn had probably provided an inaccurate portrayal of events to FBI investigators, according to Trump lawyer John Dowd.3. Comey says Trump asks for loyalty, Trump fires FlynnOn Jan. 27, President Trump arranges a dinner with then-FBI Director James Comey, where, according to Comey’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, the president says: “I need loyalty, I expect loyalty.”Comey said he felt like the dinner was an effort on the part of the president to have him ask for his job and “create some sort of patronage relationship.”Trump has denied askinf Comey for a loyalty pledge.Meanwhile, the spin cycle continues to churn about Flynn’s discussions with Kislyak, accounts of which were leaked to the Washington Post. About two weeks later, on Feb. 13, Trump fires Flynn.4. Trump wonders aloud about leniencyThe very next day, according to Comey, he visited the Oval Office for a meeting with Trump and advisers. Afterward, the president clears the room of everyone except him and the FBI director.“I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go,” Comey says Trump said.Comey says he would not agree to let it go.I never asked Comey to stop investigating Flynn. Just more Fake News covering another Comey lie!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 3, 2017Trump has continually denied that he ever asked Comey to stop investigating Flynn.5. Trump pressures Sessions to “safeguard” himSusan Walsh/APAttorney General Jeff Sessions waits to make a statement at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office in Washington in March 2017, days after recusing himself from the Justice Department’s Russia investigation.In March 2017, Comey worked for Jeff Sessions, the attorney general and the head of the Justice Department.But public pressure was building for Sessions, who worked much of 2016 as a senior adviser to the Trump campaign, to recuse himself from the Justice Department investigation into whether the Trump campaign was connected in some way to Russia’s attack on the presidential election.Behind the scenes, President Trump gave “firm orders” to White House counsel McGahn to lobby Sessions not to recuse himself, because the president expected his top law enforcement official to “safeguard” him, according to The New York Times.Meanwhile, Sessions was exploring ways to try to dirty up Comey in the press. He instructed aides to ask compatriots if they had anything that would make the FBI director look bad; Sessions reportedly wanted one negative story per day. The Justice Department denies that.Trump’s efforts, at least, didn’t work, and Sessions indeed recused himself on March 2, handing over the reins of the Russia investigation to his deputy, Rod Rosenstein. Trump, furious, upbraided the attorney general — but does not accept his resignation when offered.5. Trump asks spy bosses to get the feds off the caseAbout three weeks later, in mid-March, Trump has a private meeting with Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats and CIA Director Mike Pompeo.Trump asks Coats to intervene with Comey to get the FBI to “back off its focus” on Flynn in regards to the Russia investigation, according to The Washington Post.Around the same time, Trump calls Coats as well as National Security Agency head Adm. Mike Rogers to see if either would put out a statement publicly denying that there is evidence of any coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia. Neither will comply.The spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, however, released a statement in response to The Post‘s reporting, saying Coats “never felt pressured by the president.”And Rogers told the Senate Intelligence Committee in June of last year that in his three years as director of the NSA, “to the best of my recollection, I have never been directed to do anything illegal, immoral, unethical or inappropriate.”6. Comey is fired, after much deliberationOn May 9, Trump fires Comey, saying in an interview two days later that the FBI director was a “showboat” and a “grandstander.”Trump also mentions the FBI’s Russia investigation, which Comey was leading — “this Russia thing,” as Trump calls it.A “meandering” letter was drafted at the time by the president and a top aide explaining the firing, according to the The New York Times, but was never sent.It’s unclear what the letter said, but the White House counsel McGahn successfully blocked Trump from sending it, giving an indication that it may have included “problematic” details about Trump’s motivations for the firing.7. Rosenstein appoints Mueller as special counselAfter a public firestorm over the Comey firing, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appoints Robert Mueller to handle the Justice Department’s Russia investigation as a special counsel on May 17.Mueller, a registered Republican, led the FBI for twelve years prior to his appointment, from 2001 to 2013.“The fact that some are playing politics does not mean that he’ll cease being law enforcement,” said former Attorney General John Ashcroft, at the time Mueller was appointed. “Frankly, the barking dogs or the clamor of politics won’t affect what he does.”8. Trump orders Mueller firedMary Altaffer/APDon McGahn leaves the Four Seasons hotel in New York, in June 2016. McGahn reportedly threatened to quit his job as White House council last summer, when president Trump ordered the firing of special counsel Robert Mueller.In mid-June, news was beginning to swirl for the first time that Mueller was looking at the president for obstruction of justice.This is significant: a person can commit obstruction without there having been an underlying crime to conceal. So even if, as Trump maintains, he and his aides did nothing wrong and did not conspire with the Russians who attacked the election, they still could be in trouble over the actions that culminated in Comey’s dismissal.So Trump tried again to remove the top leader of the Russia investigation — this time, Mueller. He lists three different reasons, and orders McGahn, the White House counsel, to fire Mueller. McGahn however, disagreed with the president’s case and threatened to quit if Trump went through with it.The president backed off the request, and this week, he called the reporting about the incident “fake news.” At the time, however, Newsmax chief executive and Trump confidant Christopher Ruddy told PBS on June 12 that he thought Trump was “considering perhaps terminating” Mueller.9. Trump Jr. statement about June 2016 Trump Tower meetingMueller’s investigators could be looking into more potential obstruction beyond the president’s desire to be rid of Comey and Mueller.For example, On July 8 aboard Air Force One, Trump dictates a statement about his son’s now-famous Trump Tower meeting. In this version, the meeting was not about the 2016 campaign. But it has become clear in the time since that Donald Trump Jr. took the meeting under the impression it would lead to compromising materials about Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton.10. White House goes on the defensiveIn the months since Mueller’s almost-firing, the Trump White House has taken a noticeably different tone about the Russia investigation.While Republican allies have continued to work to undermine its credibility, the White House itself also touted how cooperative it is being.“The cooperation and transparency are unprecedented,” attorneys for the president wrote, in releasing a list of information they’ve turned over.Trump said on Wednesday that “there’s no obstruction whatsoever,” and that allegations that are being misinterpreted as obstruction was just him defending himself.As Mueller looks over this timeline of events, however, attorneys say it may not matter how many reams of documents the White House provides happily or whether or not Mueller was actually fired.“Attempted obstruction is obstruction,” constitutional lawyer and Harvard Law School professor Laurence Tribe told Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin, “even when the perpetrator backs down after failing to get his consigliere to do the deed for him.”Copyright 2018 NPR. 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