a month agoBournemouth boss Howe: Southampton clash will be really feisty

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth boss Howe: Southampton clash will be really feistyby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth boss Eddie Howe expects the tackles to fly tomorrow night against Southampton.Southampton meet traditional rivals Portsmouth in the Carabao Cup on Tuesday, but Howe feels Bournemouth’s games against the Saints are “gaining in everybody’s focus”.”It should be a really feisty game, a really good atmosphere and an entertaining match,” Bournemouth boss Howe told Sky Sports. “Southampton have started very well, too.”It’s gaining in everybody’s focus. The more games we have, the more the rivalry will intensify I think.”We’ve enjoyed the games against Southampton which have been tight and tough, from both clubs’ perspectives. We’re looking forward to another entertaining match.” last_img read more

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Nova Scotia election roundup

first_imgHALIFAX – (Liberals-Caregivers)The Liberals say they will spend $25 million expanding eligibility for the caregiver benefit over four years.The program gives about $400 a month to those caring for people with severe dementia.Premier Stephen McNeil says the program would be expanded to include 400 people who care for those with lower levels of dementia this year and another 1,200 people caring for those with mental illness in 2018.He says the change will mean about 1,600 more Nova Scotians will qualify for financial help.(The Canadian Press)—(NSHA-Executive-Furniture)The NDP released documents showing the Nova Scotia Health Authority spent nearly $500,000 on new furniture and renovations for its executive offices.The documents show the furniture cost over $257,000 while the renovations came in at just under $195,000.NDP Leader Gary Burrill says after cuts to long-term care in particular, Premier Stephen McNeil owes an explanation for the expenses.McNeil says the cost of the furniture “makes no sense to me,” and spending that kind of money at a time when money is needed for care in the health system is “excessive and inappropriate.”(The Canadian Press)—(NSElxn-Tories)Nova Scotia’s Progressive Conservatives are promising to bring back a refundable film tax credit.Tory Leader Jamie Baillie has announced $34 million to revive the credit in a bid to aid the film and TV industry.He says the industry was set back when the Liberals controversially axed the tax in 2015.—(NSElxn-NDP)The NDP are pledging to restore funding for seniors’ care if elected May 30th.Leader Gary Burrill says $60 million over four years would be put towards long-term care for seniors.Burrill says he would also freeze pharmacare premiums and lobby for a national pharmacare plan.(The Canadian Press)—(Party-Nominations)Elections Nova Scotia says nominations for the May 30 vote have closed.It says 203 candidates have been nominated in the province’s 51 electoral districts.The Liberals, Tories and NDP have candidates in all 51 ridings.The Green Party has nominated 32 candidates while the Atlantica Party is running 15 and there are three Independents.(The Canadian Press)—(N.S. Election Roundup by The Canadian Press)last_img read more

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Outstanding transactions at Phoenix pay centre surpass 500000 says minister

first_imgOTTAWA – The backlog of outstanding pay problems faced by federal civil servants has now reached a staggering 520,000, the minister responsible for the problem-plagued Phoenix pay system has revealed in a letter of apology to government employees.That number is expected to grow further, Public Services and Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough said in the letter being circulated to federal civil servants over the next couple of days, which was provided to The Canadian Press.“I am truly sorry that more than half of public servants continue to experience some form of pay issue,” the minister’s letter states. “Too many of you have been waiting too long for your pay.”“Your stories of hardship caused by the backlog of financial transactions keep me awake at night.”The outstanding transactions include non-financial requests from employees, such as changes to banking or home address information.But it also includes 265,000 cases in which government workers have been underpaid, overpaid, or not paid at all and have waited beyond what the government considers an acceptable period of time for their issues to be resolved.In the letter, Qualtrough repeated what she and her predecessor in the portfolio have been saying for months — that the situation is “unacceptable.”And she emphasized that anyone working in government who is experiencing financial hardship as a result of pay problems can request an emergency salary advance.One major factor that has prevented the government from reducing the pay issue backlog was the recent need to retroactively adjust the paycheques of government workers after new collective agreements were ratified.So far, roughly 184,000 government employees have seen their paycheques adjusted to the new contracts, the minister said.But another 20,000 collective agreement payments have yet to be processed and the number is expected to grow in coming weeks as more renewed contracts come into force.Qualtrough said dealing with the pay system backlog will continue to be a slow process as the government seeks a “permanent solution” to the Phoenix debacle.But her letter made no mention of a call this week by one of the country’s biggest civil service unions to build an in-house pay system and to scrap the Phoenix system altogether.The Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada said earlier this week that IT professionals already working within government can build and thoroughly test a new pay system within a year.The government has so far earmarked $400 million to fix the system and to deal with the existing pay backlog, partly by hiring more pay administrators at centres in Quebec and New Brunswick. But Qualtrough said in an interview aired last weekend that she could not guarantee the amount wouldn’t reach $1 billion.The government hasn’t hired nearly enough people, quickly enough, to deal with the massive backlog of pay cases, the Public Service Alliance of Canada said Thursday.“The government needs to step up its hiring process and expand the compensation capacity both in the pay centres and in departments,” said PSAC national president Robyn Benson.Initiated by the previous Conservative government in 2009, the Phoenix system was meant to streamline the payroll of public servants across dozens of departments and agencies, and save more than $70 million annually.In a joint statement issued Thursday, Qualtrough and Treasury Board President Scott Brison again accused the Conservatives of saddling the government with a “botched” system.“They rushed the design and implementation, did not train staff, all while firing 700 experienced pay advisers who were needed to make sure public servants were paid on time,” said the statement.The Conservatives have denied responsibility for the debacle, saying it was the Liberals, elected in 2015, who ultimately failed to heed warnings from civil service unions that the system wasn’t ready before fully launching it in April 2016.A report from an auditor general’s review of the Phoenix pay system problems is expected to be made public next week.— Follow @tpedwell on Twitterlast_img read more

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Ohio State womens soccer splits weekend matchups

OSU sophomore forward Lindsay Agnew (20) throws the ball into play Oct. 24 in a match against Iowa at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 2-1. Credit: Regina Bonfiglio / Lantern photographerWhile trying to keep its hopes of making the Big Ten Tournament alive, the Ohio State women’s soccer team fell to Iowa, but bounced back against Nebraska.The Buckeyes (6-9-3, 3-6-3) and Cornhuskers (7-9-2, 3-7-2) played to a scoreless first half on Sunday before OSU broke through with three goals in the second.Before the barrage of goals, OSU entered halftime with a 4-1 lead in shots and 2-1 lead in shots on goal. Coach Lori Walker said the team contained the Cornhuskers’ offense through teamwork.“Everything for us recently has just been about taking care of ourselves and not giving away opportunities for other teams to capitalize on,” Walker said. “You do that by playing together and playing as a united group.”Things picked up in the second half when Nebraska senior forward Mayme Conroy scored the first goal of the game off an assist from junior defender Jaylyn Odermann to give Nebraska a 1-0 lead in the 57th minute.The Buckeyes responded in the 76th minute when a cross from sophomore forward Nichelle Prince allowed freshman forward Sammy Edwards to tie the game.OSU went ahead in the 87th minute after freshman midfielder Nikki Walts nailed a 22-yard shot. The Buckeyes cemented the victory after Prince finished a breakaway into an empty net in the 90th minute to give OSU the 3-1 win.The Buckeyes outshot Nebraska, 25-7, in the game.Senior midfielder Ellyn Gruber said the Cornhuskers’ style of play was a challenge but OSU was able to match it.“They were very physical and very aggressive,” Gruber said. “I think we handled that aggression very well and played physical right back.”Walker praised the team’s ability to respond after giving up a goal in the second half. “If anyone has had the best training in adversity this season, it’s been our squad,” Walker said. “We got down and were able to pick ourselves back up.” The win was the first for the Buckeyes since defeating Northwestern on Sept. 28. OSU had gone 0-3-3 since that game. Prince said getting the win felt like the culmination of the stretch.  “We’ve been on a very long journey,” Prince said. “We’ve been working really hard and it’s been hard to get results, but we’ve pushed through and haven’t given up yet.”It was a different story when the Buckeyes played Iowa on Friday. The Hawkeyes took the early lead after senior forward Cloe Lacasse put a header in the back of the OSU net in the fifth minute. The rest of the first half remained quiet as the Hawkeyes took a 1-0 lead into halftime. Iowa scored again, as a free kick from senior defender Melanie Pickert doubled the lead in the 80th minute. OSU got on the board in the 86th minute after Prince converted off an assist from sophomore forward Taylor Schissler. The Buckeyes weren’t able to tie it up, giving Iowa the 2-1 win.The Buckeyes are scheduled to play their final game of the regular season against Rutgers on Friday at 7 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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Glenti for top end

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The Greek Glenti in Darwin is just around the corner, so be sure to leave the weekend of 9 – 10 June free to celebrate in the largest ethnic party in the Northern Territory. The Greek Glenti, held at historic Bicentennial Park in Darwin, is a fun and vibrant festival where the Greek community shares their culture, food, wine, dance and music with locals and visitors. The Glenti consists of local and interstate entertainment and acts and besides being able to eat Greek food, you can see people wearing traditional Greek clothing, be enlightened by the Greek culture, listen to Greek music, and see traditional dancing and much more. The Greek Glenti will be held at Bicentennial Park in Darwin on Saturday 9 and Sunday 10 June at midday.last_img read more

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Tottenham reportedly set sights on Porto captain

first_imgThe Portuguese news outlet A Bola have reported that Tottenham Hotspur plot a January swoop for Porto captain Hector Herrera, whose market value stands at around €8 million.According to the same source, the Spurs would like to beat the competition from Barcelona, Inter Milan, Roma, and Arsenal, and grab the 28-year-old midfielder as early as next winter.With Mousa Dembele’s contract set to expire at the end of the ongoing season, and with Victor Wanyama and Moussa Sissoko’s struggle to live up to expectations, Mauricio Pochettino is forced to rush into the market to keep his side competitive on multiple fronts.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.Meanwhile, Herrera’s contract is also about to run down in less than a year, and in case Azuis e brancos opt to refuse eventual offers in January, he might leave Estadio do Dragao without a compensation fee next summer.Already established as one of the most solid midfielders in the Portuguese Primeira Liga, the former Pachuca man is known for his pinpoint passing and vision, which is the main reason Pochettino would like to see him in the Premier League.However, considering the fierce competition and Porto’s stubbornness when it comes to negotiations, the north London outfit will have to put maximum effort to close the deal.last_img read more

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Homer Man Arrested For Entering Home And Assaulting Residents With Bear Spray

first_imgThe Alaska State Troopers responded to the incident at an address on Stovall Ave in Anchor Point, and arrested Roy Burke, 40, of Homer. Burke also took items from inside the house and fled the scene in a vehicle.  Further investigation by Troopers showed Burke was on conditions of release from another criminal case. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A Homer man was arrested for entering a residence without permission and assaulting several people inside the residence with bear spray, on May 8. According to the Troopers Burke had entered the residence without permission and assaulted several people inside the residence with bear spray. According to an online Trooper dispatch, an arrest warrant was issued for Burke.  Burke was contacted and arrested later the same night and transported to Wildwood Pretrial facility.last_img read more

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Nationally Renowned A Cappella Quartet To Perform At TewksburyWilmington Elks On September 8

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — The Buzz, an award-winning ensemble in both the national competitions of The Barbershop Harmony Society and Sweet Adelines, is hosting their last ever New England performance on Saturday, September 8 at 7pm at the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks (777 South Street).This musical party happening, filled with great performances, is largely organized by members of the Wilmington-based Merrimack Valley Acappella, a chorus of over 40 women, from communities all over the area.The concert will feature performances from several other top quartets, including Saffron.Tickets cost $25 and can be purchased online HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington-Based Merrimack Valley A Cappella Chorus Presents Spring Cabaret On April 28In “Community”Wilmington-Based Merrimack Valley Chorus To Hold Concert On April 24In “Community”MISSING WEDDING BAND: Keep An Eye Out Around Elia’s Or Tewksbury-Wilmington ElksIn “Community”last_img read more

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Oracle Faces Scrutiny over 13 Billion Verdict Against SAP

first_imgA U.S. appeals court appeared skeptical on Tuesday about reinstating a $1.3 billion jury verdict won by Oracle Corp against SAP, in a case where the European software company admitted massive copyright infringement.At a court hearing on Tuesday, two 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges also suggested Oracle may deserve more than the roughly $300 million it had been assigned by a lower court.A Northern California jury awarded Oracle $1.3 billion in 2010 over accusations that SAP AG subsidiary, TomorrowNow, wrongfully downloaded millions of Oracle files. SAP had acquired TomorrowNow as part of a strategy to provide software support to Oracle customers at lower rates than what Oracle charged, and eventually convince some of those companies to become SAP customers.The trial between the two enterprise software competitors was widely watched at the time, as top Oracle executives Larry Ellison and Safra Catz testified. However, U.S. District Judge Phyllis Hamilton in Oakland, California ruled that Oracle had proven actual damages of only $272 million.Oracle has asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse that ruling.At a court hearing on Tuesday before a three-judge 9th Circuit panel, Oracle attorney Kathleen Sullivan said internal SAP documents showed SAP had expected about $900 million in new revenue by using TomorrowNow to poach Oracle customers. That, and other evidence, was sufficient for the jury to arrive at its $1.3 billion figure, Sullivan argued.However, 9th Circuit Judge Susan Graber questioned whether those SAP revenue figures were objective evidence of the value of the copyrighted material.”It’s hypothetical revenue information, which is not the same,” Graber said.”These may be pie in the sky dreaming,” Judge William Fletcher added.The judges did not issue a formal ruling from the bench. SAP eventually shuttered TomorrowNow, which pleaded guilty to criminal copyright infringement and other charges.SAP admitted liability for the downloads just prior to the 2010 trial, so the only issue in dispute was how much SAP would pay Oracle in damages. Oracle said that figure should be calculated based on what SAP would have paid Oracle had it licensed the materials, instead of downloading them without permission. Oracle estimated that amount in the billions.In her lower court ruling, however, Hamilton decided Oracle is only entitled to profits it had lost as a result of the downloads, as well as any profits SAP gained. The judge calculated that amount at $272 million.At the 9th Circuit hearing on Tuesday, Graber said $272 million “seems low,” and Fletcher said it “seems to me wrong.”SAP attorney Tharan “Greg” Lanier defended the amount, though he acknowledged that Oracle presented evidence at trial that the profits calculation could come to $487 million.The case in the 9th Circuit is Oracle Corp et al. vs. SAP AG et al., 12-16944.last_img read more

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GoAir sale of tickets at just Rs 1199 has customers reeling

first_imgGoAir flight. (Representational Image)Wikimedia CommonsLow-cost airline GoAir has announced a massive two-day sale beginning Thursday, January 3. It is offering all-inclusive flight tickets at Rs 1,199 between major cities like Pune, Ahmedabad, Chandigarh, Mumbai, Patna, Bengaluru, Delhi, Goa, Hyderabad, Ranchi, Kolkata, Lucknow, Nagpur and Chennai.The cheapest ticket is priced at Rs 1,199 from Chennai to Port Blair in Andaman and Nicobar Islands.Some of the routes are Goa-Mumbai (Rs 1,499; travel period: July 15 to September 8), Patna-Kolkata (Rs 1,299; travel period: July 1 to September 8), Goa-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20), Goa-Hyderabad (Rs 1,399; travel period: July 1 to September 15), Hyderabad-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20).Interested customers can go to the company’s website and buy their tickets under the ‘Fly Smart, Save Big’ category.In December 2018, GoAir had offered all-inclusive tickets priced at Rs 1,499 for trips between April 1, 2019, and June 30, 2019.last_img read more

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For Texas DACA Recipients Court Ruling Is A Small Win — But

first_imgLexey SwallTomas Martinez, with GLAHR, a grass roots organization from Atlanta, chants to excite the crowd in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 18, 2016.Like many other immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, Carolina Ramirez celebrated this week after a federal judge moved to temporarily preserve a program that protects immigrants like her.But the Houston resident and her allies were cautious with their joy. The fight for the program remains on Capitol Hill, Ramirez said. “I just need Congress to get things together,” she said. “They just need to really hold the line and make sure the deportations don’t continue to happen.”Ramirez, 28, has called Texas home for 20 years. She’s a recipient of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The program, which awards its recipients with renewable, two-year work permits and deportation reprieves, has been targeted for elimination under the administration of President Donald Trump. But those plans were at least paused thanks to a nationwide preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Tuesday.Alsup ordered the program to remain in place during a lawsuit filed by the state of California that argues that the current administration failed to follow the law when Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the announcement to rescind DACA on Sep. 5.“[The injunction] shows the courts agree with protecting immigrant youth,” Ramirez said. “DACA is more than a paper to me.”There are nearly 690,000 recipients in the United States. More than 120,000 live in Texas, meaning the program is especially important for the state. Ramirez stressed that the court’s decision was a temporary solution, rather than a permanent one for DACA recipients. The real fight, she said, will be in Washington, where members of Congress need to “feel the pressure” to make a deal before the Jan. 19 deadline for a government funding bill.On Tuesday, Trump met with Democratic and Republican lawmakers to discuss the future of DACA, and said he wanted a “clean bill” to protect DACA recipients. Later, he added he still wanted an overhaul of immigration policy, which includes his much-desired border wall. Leaders of both parties agreed they’d like to reach a deal that protects undocumented childhood arrivals and strengthens border security. A bipartisan bill “will provide a discreet solution to the crisis that Trump created when he ended DACA on Sept. 5th,” said Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center.“The communities want it, the majority of Americans want it — even legislators on both sides of the aisle have said that they want it and they understand and recognize it needs to get done in January. Congress has a real solution in front of them.”Adrian Reyna, DREAM Act campaign director of the national advocacy group United We Dream, is also a DACA recipient. Reyna said he received a call from his sister Wednesday morning. She asked him if everything was fixed because of the injunction.Unfortunately, he said, it wasn’t. There was still work left to do.“The devil is in the details — of course not everything is fixed,” he said. Meanwhile, Raymund Paredes, Texas commissioner of higher education, told reporters in a phone call Wednesday morning that DACA remains a critical issue for students in the state.“We have tens of thousands of students who fit in the DACA category,” Paredes said. “The United States is their country. A lot of these kids, these young people, don’t remember living anywhere else.”In June, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, along with officials from nine other states, wrote a letter to the Trump administration urging officials to end the DACA program.Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn told reporters Wednesday morning that the federal injunction wouldn’t impact the bipartisan negotiations. Still, he said Tuesday’s court decision was wrong.“If President Obama can create the deferred action program, then certainly President Trump can un-create it, or end it. It just makes sense,” Cornyn said, according to The Hill.Ramirez will be watching closely. She said the past several months have brought a surge in young people coming together to help save DACA. Her personal fight won’t stop because of the recent ruling.“I’ve been able to dedicated my time fully to the future of my community,” Ramirez said. “I feel a lot of energy and a lot of love for my community.” Disclosure: Raymund Paredes has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune. A complete list of Tribune donors and sponsors can be viewed here.  Sharelast_img read more

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This Is It Im Going To Die

first_img by NPR News Lauren Frayer 8.21.19 12:11pm Last year, a long-distance truck driver, Mohammad Hashim, was hauling a load of refrigerators out of New Delhi when a dozen strangers on motorbikes forced him off the road.They pulled him out of his truck and demanded he open the back. They wanted to see if Hashim was transporting cows or beef — which is illegal in many Indian states, because cows are sacred in Hinduism, the majority religion in India.”But I’m just the driver, and I’m not allowed to open the back of the truck. It was locked,” Hashim, 45, recalls. “So they pulled on my beard and tried to force me to chant ‘Jai Shri Ram.'”That slogan — which means “Praise Lord Ram,” a Hindu god — has long been known as a prayer. Now it’s an incitement to mob violence against India’s minorities.Hashim, a Muslim, refused to chant in praise of a Hindu god. So the men started beating him.”I thought, ‘This is it. I’m going to die,'” he recalls. “Then I went unconscious.”A surge in lynchingsSince the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party won power in India five years ago, lynchings of the country’s minorities have surged. In February, Human Rights Watch reported at least 44 such murders between May 2015 and December 2018. Hundreds more people have been injured in religiously motivated attacks.Most of the victims are Muslims, members of the country’s largest religious minority. They comprise about 15% of India’s 1.3 billion people. Other victims include lower-caste Hindus and Christians.Most of the attackers are devout Hindu men, known as “cow vigilantes,” who take it upon themselves to enforce beef bans. Some of them claim ties to the BJP. Last year, a BJP minister met with a group of men convicted of a lynching and draped them in flower garlands.After Prime Minister Narendra Modi won a second term in a landslide victory in May, a new parliament was sworn in, dominated by his BJP. As opposition lawmakers, particularly one Muslim politician, recited the oath of office, some BJP lawmakers taunted them with chants of “Jai Shri Ram.”Last month, a BJP state minister was filmed heckling a Muslim lawmaker and trying to force him to chant “Jai Shri Ram” outside the Jharkhand state assembly.In an April report, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom condemned what it called the Indian government’s “allowance and encouragement of mob violence against religious minorities.” In June, after a lynching in Jharkhand, the U.S. commission called on the Indian government to “take concrete actions that will prevent this kind of violence and intimidation.”Article 15 of India’s constitution prohibits discrimination based on religion. Human rights groups are lobbying for the creation of a specific hate crimes law, but none exists in India yet.”It’s like they are trying to erase us”One of India’s most infamous recent lynching cases was that of Pehlu Khan, 55, a Muslim dairy farmer from Haryana state.In April 2017, Khan and his two sons were driving home from a cattle fair in neighboring Rajasthan, with two cows and two calves in the back of their truck, when strangers on motorcycles surrounded them.”I showed them receipts for the cows we’d bought, but they tore them up — and started beating us with hockey sticks,” says Khan’s son Mohamed Irshad, 27. “I suffered internal bleeding. My brother and I barely survived — and all of India saw what happened to our father.”That’s because the attackers themselves recorded a video of their assault and posted it on social media. In a two-minute clip, the men praise Hindu gods as they punch and kick Khan. His white tunic splattered with blood, the father of eight pleads for his life, calling his attackers “brother.”That graphic video is how Khan’s widow Jaibuna, who goes by one name, learned of her husband’s death. She was waiting for him to return home from the cattle fair when a neighbor ran up and showed her the clip on his cell phone.”People were saying, ‘Don’t show her, this is her family!'” recalls Jaibuna, who is in her mid-40s but doesn’t know her exact age. “Everyone was panicking, and I couldn’t take it. I fainted.”Before he died, Khan was able to describe his attackers to police. Six men were arrested. Charges against them were dropped, then reinstated, and the case remained in limbo for two years — until last week, when a court acquitted all of them, citing lack of evidence.Instead, Khan was charged posthumously with cow smuggling. Police say he didn’t have a permit to transport cows across state lines. Khan’s two sons, who were with him that day, await trial — and if convicted, face the possibility of up to five years in prison.”It’s like they are trying to erase us — erase all of my people,” Jaibuna says in the muddy courtyard of their family farm.The family has sold off their cattle, to avoid further attacks. They’re frightened. A sole buffalo remains on their farm, along with some chickens.Former BJP lawmaker Gyan Dev Ahuja, who represented the Rajasthan district where Khan was murdered, has said he has “no regret over his death.” He called Khan a “sinner.”A lack of public outcryVideos of religiously motivated attacks in India like the one that killed Khan continue to go viral. There’s a new clip on social media practically every week.But prosecutions — of the attackers, at least — are rare. So is public outrage.”How does a majority stay silent and witness something, unless you believe that what’s happening is the right thing?” asks author Rana Ayyub, who went undercover to write a book about the BJP’s role in anti-Muslim riots in Modi’s home state of Gujarat, where Modi served as chief minister before becoming prime minister.The lack of public outcry over the surge in lynchings shows that India’s Hindu majority tacitly supports not murder, Ayyub says, but some discrimination against Muslims.Some Indian analysts say the situation in India is comparable to the post-Civil War period in the United States, when many white people looked on as black people were lynched.”The similarities with the American lynchings of the late 19th century are striking,” says Prabhir Vishnu Poruthiyil, a business professor at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay who has studied corporate India’s lack of response to hate crimes.”Most of the upper-middle class that populate[s] the corporate classes, they’re also upper-caste Hindus,” Poruthiyil explains. “Even if they don’t agree with the lynching itself, they might be OK with the idea of stopping cow slaughter. It’s a slippery slope.”As a child in Mumbai, Ayyub survived Hindu-Muslim riots in 1992 and 1993, which killed several hundred people. But she says what’s happening now feels worse, because it’s not a “spur of the moment” outpouring of anger. There are very specific targets.”Now lynchings are organized on social media,” Ayyub says. “People send messages to each other, saying, ‘Hey, this household has beef in their fridge, let’s go attack them.”She says India’s Muslims increasingly perceive such attacks as being against them, rather than in defense of cows and Hindu customs. The repercussions could be dangerous, Ayyub warns. She’s worried that Muslims are being alienated as Hindu nationalists revise mainstream Indian norms along Hindu lines.”When you try to stifle a community, when you try to put them down, when you try to make them secondary citizens, their anger will burst on the streets,” Ayyub says. “That’s how you radicalize people.”Offering helpThere is a small, fledgling movement of Indians — Muslims and Hindus — working to fight hate crimes and help victims.In donated office space in New Delhi, four cellphones are lined up on a desk. When one line is busy, the next one rings. This is the headquarters of a new hate crimes helpline, created by United Against Hate, a network of volunteers. Organizers say they’ve received 15,000 phone calls since launching in July.Callers “are very upset. They are very worried and say, ‘We are in a difficult position,'” says dispatcher Jagisha Arora. “One person called me and said, ‘I’m at police station right now. Police are refusing to lodge a complaint. They are threatening us.'”Arora, 26, logs details from each call in an Excel spreadsheet and connects callers to free legal aid in 100 different Indian cities.But from time to time, she also gets a different type of call — from people who are angry that this helpline even exists.”Some people call to complain, like, ‘Why are you spreading this?’ They accuse me and say Muslims are bad,” she says, shaking her head. Fears persistHashim, the truck driver, survived his lynching on the highway outside New Delhi. After the attack, he was bedridden for six months with a broken leg and fractured vertebrae.He can’t read or write, so his supervisor at the trucking company — a Hindu — helped him file a police report. Nothing has come of it.Now it’s time for Hashim to get back on the road. He needs to provide for his five children.”My children say, ‘Don’t worry about us, Daddy. We can stay poor. We’ll eat less. We want you to be safe,'” Hashim says.They’re scared that next time, their father might not come home.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. ‘This Is It. I’m Going To Die’: India’s… https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2019/08/20190819_me_spate_of_lynchi…last_img read more

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Acid thrown from taxi at passerby six injured

first_imgKolkata: Six persons, including five women in their early 20s, were injured when unidentified persons allegedly threw some chemical, supposedly acid, at them from a moving taxi last night at Panditia Road in the southern part of the city, police said today. The victims were passersby and the incident took place around 9.30 pm last night, the police said.Locals chased the yellow taxi but the riders including the driver escaped leaving the vehicle behind, a senior officer of Kolkata Police said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights”They (people in the car) attacked the people indiscriminately and randomly and no one was the target, in particular,” he added.Kolkata Police Deputy Commissioner (South) Meeraj Khalid said, “We have intercepted the taxi. A case has been lodged at Rabindra Sarovar police station. We are talking to the witnesses and the victims. We will soon arrest the culprits.” “We are yet to get hold of the driver Ricky Mondal, who was appointed by the owner. We found the room where he was staying in Kalighat area under lock and key. We have launched a search for him,” the investigating officer. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”Going by the eye witnesses version it seems there were around four to five men inside the taxi. We have asked for the CCTV footages of the area,” he added.A case was lodged at the Rabindra Sarovar police station and a search has been launched for the attackers using the vehicle’s registration number, he said.The injured were discharged after preliminary treatment at a state-run facility.Police were trying to find out the nature of the chemical which was allegedly hurled at the victims.”We have collected samples of the liquid from the spot and send it for testing at the laboratory. We are not sure whether the liquid was acid because there were no serious injuries on the victims. They only complained of a burning sensation,” the police officer added.last_img read more

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Underconstruction flyover collapses in Darjeelings Phansidewa

first_imgDarjeeling: A portion of an under-construction flyover came crashing down at Phansidewa in Darjeeling district on Saturday without injuring anybody, police said.The incident happened near Kanthibhita in Phansidewa town along the National Highway 31D.Four laning of the highway is presently going on in the stretch which is a part of the East-West corridor envisaged under National Highways Development Project — Phase II, and is a vital link for connectivity to the North-East. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSDO, Siraj Daneswar, BDO and DM Jayashi Dasgupta were present along with the police team at the spot since early morning.”This is an accident caused by some technical fault. The technical staff and the engineers on the project can give a proper explanantion for the same. The investigation has begun and the construction procedure has been stopped unless the matter is investigated by the National Highway Authority of India(NHAI),” said Dasgupta, the District Magistrate.Though 25 meters of the under-constructed flyover has collapsed, there are no reports of any injury. The area had been cordoned off by the police later in the morning.last_img read more

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