Survey Americans dont understand impact of excess weight on heart and overall

first_imgAccording to the CDC, nearly 40 percent of Americans, 93 million people, are obese, and even more are overweight.For more information and complete survey results, go to: clevelandclinic.org/loveyourheartMethodologyCleveland Clinic’s survey of the general population gathered insights into Americans’ perceptions of heart health and weight. This was an online survey conducted among a national probability sample consisting of 1,002 adults 18 years of age and older, living in the continental United States. The total sample data is nationally representative based on age, gender, ethnicity and educational attainment census data. The online survey was conducted by Research Now and completed between September 20 and September 28, 2018. The margin of error for the total sample at the 95% confidence level is +/- 3.1 percentage points. Source:https://my.clevelandclinic.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 31 2019A Cleveland Clinic survey finds that while most Americans (88 percent) understand that there is a connection between a healthy heart and a healthy weight, most aren’t doing enough – or anything – to combat their own weight issues. The survey found 74 percent are concerned about their weight and 65 percent are worried about getting heart disease due to extra pounds, yet less than half (43 percent) of Americans have tried to make dietary changes to lose weight and 40 percent of those who describe themselves as overweight or obese say they aren’t careful about which foods they eat.Part of the problem may be that Americans aren’t sure what to eat for heart health. Nearly one-in-five (18 percent) believe their diet has nothing to do with their heart health, and a mere 14 percent knew that a Mediterranean diet is healthiest for heart health. What’s more, nearly half of Americans (46 percent) believe using artificial sweeteners is a healthy way to lose weight despite studies showing they don’t promote weight loss.The survey also revealed Americans don’t fully understand the impact excess weight has on their heart and overall health. The overwhelming majority of Americans (87 percent) fail to link obesity to cancer or atrial fibrillation (80 percent). More than half of Americans also don’t know that obesity is linked to high “bad” cholesterol levels (54 percent) or coronary artery disease (57 percent) and two-thirds (64 percent) don’t know it can lead to a stroke.”Most Americans understand abstractly that being overweight or obese is not good for your health, but it seems we are not grasping that the leading causes of death and disability – stroke, cancer, coronary artery disease – are all adversely affected by increased weight,” said Steven Nissen, M.D., chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. “We need to do a better job of educating patients and the public about the major consequences of carrying excess weight and the benefits of losing weight. A patient only needs to lose five percent of their body weight to start seeing important health benefits.”Eighty-four percent of Americans say they have tried at least one weight-loss method in the past. About one-third (30 percent) say they typically stick with it between one week and one month. Americans cite dislike of exercise (24 percent) and lack of time (22 percent) as their main barriers to maintaining a healthy weight. Most Americans also believe their metabolism is detrimental to weight loss – 60 percent of women and 46 percent of men say their metabolism is working against them.”Americans may be correct that their metabolism is thwarting their weight loss efforts,” said Dr. Nissen. “Once you’ve been overweight, your body tries to hold on to that excess fat, making it more difficult to lose weight. It’s best to work with your physician to develop a steady long term weight loss plan that will help you keep off the pounds. Quick weight loss programs are not effective.”Related StoriesSmoking triples the risk of death from cardiovascular diseaseImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardioHeart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States and around the world. The survey was conducted as part of Cleveland Clinic’s “Love your Heart” consumer education campaign in celebration of American Heart Month. Cleveland Clinic has been ranked the No. 1 hospital in the country for cardiology and cardiac surgery for 24 years in a row by US News & World Report.Additional survey findings include:center_img All fat is not created equal: When it comes to body shapes, almost half (45%) falsely believe that all types of fat put you at equal risk for heart disease; however, numerous studies have shown that fat stored in the abdomen is the most dangerous. Not feeling the pressure: Most Americans say they are concerned about a family member’s weight (62 percent), or them getting heart disease due to their weight (64%). However, for many, outside pressure to lose the weight doesn’t help. Fifty-seven percent say they don’t need others to tell them to lose weight because they already know they should. Baby Boomers (65 percent) are particularly resistant to others weighing in on their weight. Seeking medical advice: While 44 percent of Americans say they are most likely to turn to their physician for nutrition advice, only a quarter (28 percent) have told their doctor they’d like to lose weight. Even less (22 percent) say they’ve discussed heart health in relation to their weight with their doctor.last_img read more

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Despite expansion of insurance coverage for depression treatment rates are lower than expected

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 24 2019A new investigation published in JAMA Psychiatry finds that while insurance coverage for depression has increased, treatment rates are lower than expected, indicating that non-financial barriers to patient care still remain. Jason Hockenberry, PhD, associate professor at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health, is the lead author of the study.”While insurance coverage has expanded, the growth in use of services has grown more modestly,” says Hockenberry. “Taken in the context of other literature, this suggests there may be other barriers to treatment at work.”Related StoriesPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationNew structured approach to managing patients with depression in primary careCPAP treatment for sleep apnea can improve depression symptomsThe researchers analyzed health services and spending data from the 1997, 2007 and 2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, which included the responses of 86,216 individuals. During the examined survey years, a number of new treatments and medications became available, as did an increase in policies targeted toward mental health (such as the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act), which increased coverage of mental health services.Findings from the researchers’ analysis show an absolute increase in the prevalence of treated depression, and that the proportion covered by insurance (Medicaid in particular) has increased. Despite this, overall spending on depression-related care has only experienced a gradual increase (approximately 2 percent a year) from 1998 to 2015, and the rate of treatment for depression remains lower than the reported rate of incidence.”Despite historic expansions of insurance coverage for individuals with mental health conditions, it appears that in this case the growth in use and cost has been more modest than some might have expected,” says Hockenberry. “The main shift has been that Medicaid expenditures for this condition have increased markedly, with a concomitant decrease among those that do not have insurance.” Source:http://whsc.emory.edu/last_img read more

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FAU researcher receives the Ernst Jung Career Advancement Award for Medical Research

first_imgZundler now hopes to decode and understand this communication network in order to be able to use it for therapeutic purposes.Source:University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Previous research has already shown that TRM cells have a key role to play in triggering flare-ups by regulating the migration and differentiation of other immune cells. We then succeeded in showing that TRM cells communicate and control other immune cells using various messenger substances.”Dr. Sebastian Zundler,FAU Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 13 2019The Jung Foundation for Science and Research has awarded the young gastroenterologist Dr. Sebastian Zundler from the Chair of Internal Medicine I at FAU the Ernst Jung Career Advancement Award for Medical Research 2019. He has been awarded the prize for his research project on the importance of intestinal tissue-resident memory T cells in the development and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The Foundation has provided prize money of 210,000 euros to support Zundler’s project over the next three years, focussing on investigating these types of cells with the aim of discovering therapeutic approaches for the future.Related StoriesAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyCommunication between cells and inflammationMore than 400,000 people in Germany are affected by the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases Morbus Crohn or ulcerative colitis. Patients often suffer from flare-ups, during which the immune system in the intestines is falsely activated and intestinal tissue damaged. In spite of advances in treating the diseases with medication, the chronic inflammation still cannot be kept sufficiently in check for a number of patients. In addition, little is known about what actually causes flare-ups.Sebastian Zundler and his team of researchers presume that intestinal TRM cells have a role to play in the development of bowel diseases such as these, as well as possibly also in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.last_img read more

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TAUs new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs VECTor PETSPECTCT

first_imgJul 10 2019Tel Aviv University’s (TAU) new Translational Medical Research Center has acquired a VECTor PET/SPECT/CT to help bridge the gap between academic discoveries and new products that benefit patients. The system will be installed at Sackler Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center (SCMIC), which will serve as the core imaging facility. Related StoriesMILabs installs pre-clinical Adaptive microCT scanner at Jagiellonian University in PolandMILabs’ new Broadband Photon Tomography selected for Innovation of the Year awardMILabs launches new E-Class line of tomographic imaging productsThe head of the center is Tel Aviv University Cancer Biology Research Center chairperson Prof. Dan Peer. Prof. Peer explains that the center’s goal is to strengthen the Israeli drug industry by accelerating bench discoveries into the clinic.  “Due to the high resolution of its multiple modalities, MILabsVECTor is expected to be great tool since its visual acuity for imaging animals is similar to the one achievable in the clinic with human patients”Prof. IlanTsarfaty, Director of Sackler Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center (SCMIC) adds: According to Prof. Beekman, CEO/CSO MILabs B.V., Source:MILabscenter_img While the visual acuity of our PET/SPECT and CT modalities are indeed outstanding, we believe that the one-to-one translation of PET and SPECT results by simultaneous imaging of co-injected tracers will significantly contribute to a quick translation of in vivo research results to clinical trials” We are excited about the addition of this innovative multimodal in vivo translational imaging system to our core imaging facility.”last_img read more

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A wise investment in a good coach pays off for Rahi Sarnobat

first_imgRahi Sarnobat holds the Indian tricolour after winning the women’s 25m pistol event at the 18th Asian Games in Indonesia   –  PTI First Indian woman to win an Asian Games gold in shooting Published on Asian Games 0 SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTScenter_img This has been a season of firsts for Indians at the ongoing Asian Games in Indonesia. After Bajrang Punia emerged from behind the giant shadows of the iconic Sushil Kumar and Yogeshwar Dutt to become the “new face of Indian wrestling”, the next three gold medallists — Vinesh Phogat in women’s wrestling, Saurabh Chaudhary, shooting and now Rahi Sarnobat, also in shooting, have all charted a new course for themselves within their own sport.If Saurabh became the youngest Indian to win a gold at the Asian Games, Vinesh became the first Indian woman to strike gold in wrestling and two days later Rahi Sarnobat has become the first Indian woman to win an Asian Games gold in shooting.Rahi is not one of those high-profile shooters on the Indian scene. She keeps to herself and calls shooting her “life” — little wonder then, her middle name is Jeevan (life). When she is not shooting, she prefers a quiet read and is currently reading the Marathi translation of a book by Kannada writer SL Bhyrappa, one of India’s foremost novelists.Eyes on Korea With the Gold medal sealed, her next assignment is Changwon, Korea, mention of which brings a smile to her face. For it was in Changwon in 2013 that Rahi won her first World Cup medal. “I hope Changwon is lucky for me again,” she says.Meeting the media after the gold, the shy Rahi, said, “This (medal) was important for me to open my mind. It has taken me to the time I was winning medals,” said the Kolhapur-born shooter, whose next aim is to confirm an Olympic quota place at the upcoming World Championships. Rahi first hit the spotlight in the Youth Commonwealth Games in Pune in 25m Pistol. She went on to add a silver behind Anisa Sayed at the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi. At the same Games, she teamed with Anisa to win the Pairs gold. Four years later in Glasgow, the Pairs event was removed from the programme, but Rahi went on to win the individual event in Glasgow. That same year she was third in Team’s event alongside Heena Sidhu and Anisa at the Incheon Asian Games.It was around the same time that she had an elbow injury and that set her back. The following year was one of rest and recovery periods — from fatigue and injury. By 2016, the injury had altered her style a little and the results were not forthcoming.That was the time she learnt about Munkhbayar Dorjsuren, a Mongolian-born shooter, who won a bronze in 1992 Olympics. Later Dorjsuren moved to Germany and won a bronze medal for her new country, Germany, at the 2008 Olympics. She also won the World title twice in 1998 and 2002. Dorjsuren had all that Rahi needed.Change of technique “I came to know that she retired after 25 years of shooting. We had one trial training camp in July last year. After that I decided to hire her as personal coach. Of course she is expensive and I could not afford her with the salary I get,” revealed Rahi.Rahi did not have the money that would be needed to get Dorjsuren as her personal coach. But she did not back down. She used the cash awards gained from Glasgow and earlier successes to get Dorjsuren.Here in Jakarta, the gold medal did not come easy. She was tied with Naphaswan Yangpaiboon of Thailand, a 2017 World Cup winner. And it took two shoot-offs before she won the gold. In another time, with another coach, Rahi may not have scaled this peak. But things had changed in the past year.On Wednesday, soon after the golden effort, the now 49-year-old Dorjsuren said, “I had to change her technique and I also worked a lot on the mental aspect of her game. She was already a high-level shooter and needed some tweak in her game. It was a close final but I had prepared her for the shoot-off.”When the event was over and the gold won, the normally reticent Rahi rushed to hug Dorjsuren. Rahi had not won a major event since Glasgow in 2014. And now this. An Asian Games gold is way more difficult than Commonwealth Games. Rahi’s approach and technique had changed for the better and now the results were beginning to show.Dorsjuren was indeed a wise investment, as more riches and medals await Rahi Jeevan Sarnobat. SHARE sport COMMENT August 22, 2018last_img read more

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38K Super 30 movie review Death by righteousness

first_imgmore-in Comments will be moderated by The Hindu editorial team. Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published. Next Story Previous StoryNow, women take centrestage in South Indian films PRINT SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DAILY NEWSLETTER Namrata Joshi Share Article SubmitPlease enter a valid email address. Progressive$699 average annual savings for drivers who switch and save.Progressive|SponsoredSponsoredUndoFigLeaf AppComplete Online Anonymity Is One Click AwayFigLeaf App|SponsoredSponsoredUndoThrone: Free Online GamesPlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addicted!Throne: Free Online Games|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTopix33 Hilarious Airport SignsTopix|SponsoredSponsoredUndoGundry MDCalling All Carnivores! 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Photo: Twitter/@super30film Comments July 12, 2019 07:00 IST Updated: Recommended for you Namrata Joshi Printable version | Jul 13, 2019 8:44:37 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/entertainment/movies/super-30-movie-review/article28390714.ece Next Story ‘Super 30’ music review: Breezy blast from the past A salutary cause and an inspirational story about the triumph of the underdog doesn’t necessarily make an engaging filmcenter_img Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to avoid rejection. July 12, 2019 12:44 IST Irony dies a painful death in a seemingly superfluous scene somewhere in the middle of Super 30 when a woman falsely accuses mathematics genius Anand Kumar (Hrithik Roshan) of sexual harassment. Of course, we might be told that it did happen for real, that Kumar had to actually face such a terrible obstacle in his greater cause of educating underprivileged kids for Indian Institute of Technology entrance examinations. But to me, the sequence felt strategically placed in what is supposedly a fictionalised account of Kumar’s life; as though in one swipe Vikas Bahl was trying to exonerate himself of all the sexual misconduct charges that were heaped on him in the height of the MeToo movement. Treated casually, like a joke, it also felt like a broad attempt to shame and silence women for bringing such issues to light.As a critic, one is told to separate the art from the artist. It’s an issue I’d be eternally conflicted about. And what of a case so special as this one, in which the artist is planting himself in a passive aggressive way into his work? Does one remain so naive as to not notice, and ignore? Does one buy into it being a mere coincidence?Super 30Director: Vikas BahlStarring: Hrithik Roshan, Mrunal Thakur, Virendra Saxena, Pankaj Tripathi, Aditya Srivastava, Vijay Varma, Amit SadhRun time: 154 minutesStoryline: A biographical film on mathematician Anand Kumar’s educational programme of training 30 underprivileged kids for IITThere is lot else that is really amusing about Super 30. Like the blue-blooded Roshan, as Kumar, talking of bringing down the hegemony of the privileged. Harping on how king’s son won’t be the king; the one who truly deserves the crown will claim it. Rather than taking it with any modicum of seriousness I could almost hear Kangana Ranaut spouting Bollywood’s much reviled N word—i.e. nepotism–through Roshan/Kumar. That’s because the film itself remains a feel-good, facile, protracted and eminently boring look at class dynamics while barely touching upon the accompanying caste conundrums.A salutary cause and an inspirational story about the triumph of the underdog doesn’t necessarily make an engaging film. More so when artificiality looms large – be it in the mounting, the dreadful brown-facing of the fair actors or the faux Bihari accents of the urbane fellas. Everything feels rehearsed and consciously righteous. Roshan, in particular, seems to be working too hard at evoking earnestness, ending up being more himself than the character. Lack of spontaneity means a disconnect than empathy for both him and his team of 30. The only one who seems to be improvising is Pankaj Tripathi as the education minister of Bihar but it’s sad to see him getting patronised increasingly as a comedian by the audience than one of India’s finest character actors that he is.The awakening of Kumar’s consciousness is sudden and not well founded at all. The riddles-based Home Alone like climax is laughable than rousing. Super 30 would have worked well had it stuck to being raw and rooted or been a more whimsical take on the disenfranchised like, say a Lagaan. It prefers wallowing in its mediocrity, using some of the hoariest tropes of story-telling – the breaking of a cycle chain standing for the end of life; an invitation letter from Cambridge getting burnt, signifying the death of dreams or a storm portending upheavals in life. The rag tag team of a Lagaan might still be alive in people’s minds but there is not a single memorable character in the entire lot of students here. In fact the staging of Sholay in English by the poor students felt uneasy and gratuitous, showcased for our privileged gaze. There is lot of sensible talk about what’s to be scared of when there is nothing to lose? “Chhalaang Lagana” (to take a long jump) is what the film advocates. Wish it could itself also take a small leap of faith, if not more, cinematically speaking. Movies Related Articles Close XFrom swirling make-up brushes to facing the camera Warangal cinematographer wins Asian New Talent Award in Shanghai Drama in the wild: on Sony BBC Earth’s upcoming series, ‘Serengeti’Now, women take centrestage in South Indian films‘Ninu Veedani Needanu Nene’: Mirror, mirror on the wall Fierce, forward, female: Bollywood’s women scriptwritersArjun Reddy, Kabir Singh and artisitic freedomTamil director Vijay marries Dr Aishwarya in a private ceremony’Rajdooth’ review: Fails to impressThe first teaser of Kannada film ‘Crush’ is outFrom swirling make-up brushes to facing the camera Warangal cinematographer wins Asian New Talent Award in Shanghai Drama in the wild: on Sony BBC Earth’s upcoming series, ‘Serengeti’Now, women take centrestage in South Indian films‘Ninu Veedani Needanu Nene’: Mirror, mirror on the wall Fierce, forward, female: Bollywood’s women scriptwritersArjun Reddy, Kabir Singh and artisitic freedomTamil director Vijay marries Dr Aishwarya in a private ceremony’Rajdooth’ review: Fails to impressThe first teaser of Kannada film ‘Crush’ is outFrom swirling make-up brushes to facing the camera Warangal cinematographer wins Asian New Talent Award in Shanghai Drama in the wild: on Sony BBC Earth’s upcoming series, ‘Serengeti’Now, women take centrestage in South Indian films1 / 10 Comments Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not ‘the’, n is not ‘and’). 3 AAA We may remove hyperlinks within comments. Related TopicsEntertainmentReviewsMoviesHindi cinema © THG PUBLISHING PVT LTD. July 12, 2019 07:00 IST Updated: ‘Super 30’ movie review: Death by righteousness July 12, 2019 12:44 ISTlast_img read more

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