5 new Toshaos elected to lead communities in Region 10

first_imgSeveral new Toshaos were recently elected to serve their respective communities of Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice) for the next year.Following the elections, which were held for the various communities, Andre Lindee was elected Toshao of Sandhills; while Wayvon King was elected to head the Wiruni village; Ricky Boye will take up the top post for Kimbia; Ken Campbell will serve Calcuni village and Winsbert Benjamin will lead the Hururu Village.Vice Chairman of Region 10, Elroy Adolph, who was present at the elections said he was pleased with the level of democracy displayed in the communities. The communities did not have an election for the past three years.Adolph further urged the newly-elected Toshaos to work collaboratively with the people of the regions to foster development.In the area of transparency as it relates to funds, Adolph said this has been a sore issue in the past and urged the new Toshaos to be accountable.“They must be transparent. Some Toshaos believe that they are the boss over the finances. Many areas do not give proper accountability, so I am pleading with them to work together to give proper accountability and to cooperate,” Adolph noted.Elymewell Barkoye, who is part of the newly-elected Council at Hururu, also noted that one of the first orders of business will be the reporting of funds which might have been misused in the past, as he pointed out that an investigation is expected to be launched.Barkoye said it will be a hard task since approximately $20 million of the community’s funds which it garners from forestry and other activities has reportedly been misused.last_img read more

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Second-tier candidates come seeking support, spotlight

first_imgCity Councilman Bill Rosendahl took Kucinich and his wife, Elizabeth, to City Hall to meet the council. Unfortunately, when Kucinich arrived, the council was involved in a ceremony creating a Sister City arrangement with Yerevan, Armenia – leaving the candidate standing stiffly to the side with no chance to speak directly to the council. Meanwhile, the Obama event last week sponsored by DreamWorks mogul David Geffen continued to draw buzz from the national media. A behind-the-scenes account by San Francisco Chronicle reporter Carla Mariniucci reported the event had one thing rarely seen at fundraisers these days: an open bar. Considering the buy-in was $2,300 and Obama raised $1.3 million at the event, it was a cheap tradeoff. Now that Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton have swept through town to raise money for their campaigns, the next tier of presidential hopefuls is seeking to tap into California’s wealth. While former Sen. John Edwards and Rep. Dennis Kucinich aren’t drawing the same level of media and Hollywood attention as Obama and Clinton, they are still seeking to solidify support from grass-roots and Democratic activists. Kucinich has made appearances before the Democratic Party of the San Fernando Valley and the UCLA Young Democrats, while Edwards is scheduled to hold a series of events in coming weeks, including a March 5 reception in Beverly Hills. But Kucinich learned how difficult it can be to get attention in L.A. Not to be outdone, Clinton is said to be pushing her L.A. supporters to do all they can to make sure she raises at least $1 more than Obama took in when her next fundraiser is held on March 24. Tired of channel surfing? Can’t get enough debate over potholes? Looking to see exactly what your neighbors are up to? Take heart. The chance to watch your neighbors at work might soon be coming to a computer near you. The Department of Neighborhood Empowerment is starting a pilot video-on-demand project in which Neighborhood Council meetings will be taped and available on the city’s Web site. Three of the 88 Neighborhood Councils will be selected in an April drawing to participate in the six-month program. Cost is estimated at $9,000 for each Neighborhood Council involved in the program. It is tempting to ask if this award was presented in a smoke-filled room, but it was actually folks like political consultant Joe Cerrell who helped bring the election process out into the open rather than leaving choices up to political bosses. Cerrell was honored last week as the 11th recipient in the American Association of Political Consultants Hall of Fame for his more than 40 years of work in national, state, and local politics, beginning with the 1960 campaign of John F. Kennedy. Before that, he was the youngest-ever director of the California Democratic Party and worked for former Gov. Pat Brown and former Attorney General Stanley Mosk. He has been a fixture at City Hall over the years for his firm’s lobbying work. rick.orlov@dailynews.com. 213-978-0390 ——— TIPOFF Rick Orlov is a Daily News staff writer. Write to him at P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200 or by e-mail at rick.orlov@dailynews.com For details on Neighborhood Council meetings, see Page 5.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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