Montague pleased with first-day execution

first_imgChairman of the organising committee for the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships, Colleen Montague, says she was pleased with the execution of the first day of the five-day championships, currently taking place inside the National Stadium. Montague admitted some disappointment that spectators continue to shun the opening day of the championships despite the free admittance, but believes there are some positive signs as she looks forward to another successful staging of the event. “Things are going very well, everyone has carried out their part, it was an amazing effort on everyone’s part to ensure that everything was in place for today (yesterday),” Montague told The Gleaner. “We had some very minor hiccups, but we are pleased with where we are. “We know that each day is different. Tomorrow (today) brings another complexion because all the schools will be out, and by Friday, the spectators will all be out, so every day brings a different aspect to Champs, and we just take it day by day,” Montague added. “We take it year by year, and what we have been seeing on all of the days is a vast improvement over a few years ago. We are taking it step by step, and we are working with all of our stakeholders. In a few years we will see even more improvements on these days,” she said. The Wolmer’s Girls’ School principal was also disappointed that the demand for grandstand tickets could not be met, but reminded fans that there will be an opportunity to watch the event on big screen outside the National Stadium’s main gate on Saturday. “We are very unhappy that we are unable to satisfy the demands of so many persons who want to be here with us,” Montague said. “We will be having a screen outside for persons who come and aren’t able to get inside, they will be able to view it and experience it there.”last_img read more

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Burnley v Brentford line-ups: Bees defender fit, new signing on bench, Burnley switch strikers

first_imgBrentford defender James Tarkowski will play at Burnley despite breaking his nose in the win at Bristol City last weekend.The Bees make one change, with summer signing Lasse Vibe making his first start. He replaces Andre Gray, who was signed by Burnley on the eve of the game but is not eligible to play.New signing Maxime Colin is among the substitutes.Burnley’s two alterations come up front, with Sam Vokes and Jelle Vossen dropped to the bench. Rouwen Hennings makes his first start since signing in the summer, and plays alongside Lukas Jutkiewicz replacing them.Burnley: Heaton; Darikwa, Duff, Keane, Mee; Boyd, Jones, Arfield, Kightly; Hennings, Jutkiewicz.Subs: Gilks, Ward, Anderson, Taylor, Vokes, Vossen, Sordell.Brentford: Button; McCormack, Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; Judge, Diagouraga, Kerschbaumer, Gogia; Hofmann, Vibe.Subs: Bonham, Barbet, Colin, O’Connell, Udumaga, Clarke, Senior.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Raiders, Donald Penn part ways

first_imgALAMEDA — With the addition of tackle Trent Brown in free agency, it came as no surprise Saturday when the Raiders released Donald Penn in what was described as a “mutual” decision.Penn arrived during a grim period when Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie decided against retaining free agent left tackle Jared Veldheer and instead coveted Rams tackle Rodger Saffold. The Raiders agreed to terms with Saffold, only to have the deal fall apart after the lineman failed a physical because of a …last_img read more

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7 Options to Consider When Choosing Kodak Motion Picture Film Stocks

first_img6. TRI-X Black and White Reversal Film 7266 (16mm and 8mm)As a reversal film, this stock offers a steady degree of contrast across the entire image. It’s ideal for studio applications with a controlled lighting environment. Kodak TRI-X Reversal Film 7266 is a high-speed, panchromatic black and white film, offering fine grain and sharpness suitable for general interior photography with artificial light. And because our films don’t require processing in a bleach containing heavy metals, they’re easier on the environment.7. Eastman Double-X Black and White Negative Film 5222/7222 (35mm and 16mm)As a more traditional black and white option, the Double-X provides a classic look and approach to this timeless aesthetic. Eastman Double-X Negative Film 5222 / 7222 has the subtleties in tone scale that you’ve come to expect. Designed for general production use outdoors and in the studio, in dim light, and anywhere you need greater depth of field, without increased illumination.If you’re looking to shoot your next project on film, discovering which stock to use is a fun, exciting process. Even if you have no experience shooting film, you’ll quickly discover that the film community is a vibrant, inviting scene, willing to answer any questions you may have.Cover image via thanasus.Looking for more filmmaking tips and tricks? Check these out.Production Tips: Getting Started with High-Output Lights on Set“The Lucas Effect”: When Filmmaking Creativity Goes UncheckedContent Creator Starter Kit: Folk HorrorLearn How to Speak Filmmaking: Formatting the ScreenplayThe Advantages of Hard Light and the Benefits of Using It on Set 5. Kodak VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203 (35mm, 16mm, and 8mm)The 50D stock is slated as the finest grain structure of all Kodak’s motion picture stocks. As a result of the fine grain, it displays a clean, crisp, and stable image structure that is worthy of archival applications. As a 50 ASA and daylight-balanced film, it’s ideal for bright daylight exterior scenarios, where you have a torrent of available light.  3. Kodak VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207/7207 (35mm, 16mm, and 8mm)The 250D is the perfect middle-of-the-road film stock. Offering 250 ASA and a daylight balance, it’s sensitive enough to use indoors with plenty of natural light, or outdoors without risk of overexposure. As a result of the lower sensitivity, this stock offers a cleaner grain structure than the 500T. This stock also offers an increased highlight latitude, preserving your imagery.  Kodak offers a wide range of options for film stocks. Here, we take a look at what’s available for your next project — and what you should expect.Although digital has largely taken over as the primary capture format, many filmmakers are now choosing to shoot their projects on film. Whether you’re looking for a specific creative aesthetic or just enjoying the process of film, understanding film stock options will help you in this stage of the creative process.1. Ektachrome Color Reversal Film (16mm and 8mm)Kodak re-releasing Ektachrome is one example of the current resurgence of filmmakers shooting their projects on film. Previously discontinued, this stock is back on the market. Ektachrome is a daylight-balanced, color-reversal film offering a unique blend of vibrant, saturated colors. At an ASA of 100, this film is great for outdoor scenarios or situations with plenty of light. It’s currently available in Super 8 and 16mm options. 2. Kodak VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 (35mm, 16mm, and 8mm)As Kodak’s most sensitive motion picture film, the 500T offers a beautiful grain structure to complement its low-light performance. As a low-light performing stock, this film would be perfect for indoor applications, or when your lighting package may be smaller. With the 500 ASA and tungsten balance, it could make a perfect independent film or documentary stock, thanks to its versatility.  4. Kodak VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213/7213 (35mm, 16mm, and 8mm)The Kodak 200T is a 200 ASA and tungsten-balanced film, introducing reduced grain and beautifully vibrant color renditions. Perfect for studio applications with tungsten lighting fixtures, this stock creates a beautifully cinematic and filmic image. last_img read more

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Four killed in clashes in West Bengal

first_imgFour men were killed and several injured in North 24 Paraganas district of West Bengal in clashes between BJP and Trinamool workers on Saturday night. Three of the dead were BJP workers, while the other was a Trinamool member. The deceased were identified as Sukanta Mandal, Pradip Mandal and Tapan Mandal of the BJP and Kayum Mollah of the Trinamool.The parties blamed each other for the violence at Bhangipara of Sandeshkhali block, about 80 kilometres south of Kolkata.According to a post by BJP, at least 18 of their supporters are missing. The BJP said Trinamool cadre attacked their activists following a scuffle over removal of saffron flags. “They opened fire indiscriminately killing three of our cadres. Kayum Mollah was shot by Trinamool activists only,” said Sayantan Basu, a BJP leader.However, Trinamool leaders said armed BJP activists had attacked their members and killed Mollah.“Kayum Mollah was hacked to death by BJP. He was shot too. BJP bringing outsiders to attack us,” said TMC leader Jyotipriya Mullick.Reportedly, TMC cadres attacked BJP activists in retaliation. However, police administration has not issued any statement.Trouble was brewing in Sandeshkhali, albeit in a different area, over last few days as a senior Government official was beaten up. Incidents of sporadic violence was reported.Leaders of both parties are expected to visit Sandeshkhali on Saturday which may trigger more commotion.last_img read more

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Former No. 1 Andy Roddick announces he’ll retire after US Open

first_imgThe 2003 champion at Flushing Meadows and former No. 1-ranked player decided to walk away from the sport whenever his U.S. Open ends, making the surprise announcement at a news conference on Thursday, his 30th birthday. “I’ll make this short and sweet: I’ve decided that this is going to be my last tournament,” said Roddick, wearing a black T-shirt and baseball cap with his clothing sponsor’s logos. “I just feel like it’s time. I don’t know that I’m healthy enough or committed enough to go another year,” he said. “I’ve always wanted to, in a perfect world, finish at this event.” The 20th-seeded Roddick is scheduled to play 19-year-old Bernard Tomic of Australia in the second round Friday night at Arthur Ashe Stadium. “I think I wanted an opportunity to say goodbye to people, as well. I don’t know how Saturday going to go, and I hope it goes well, and I’m sticking around,” Roddick said. He was, by turns, in reflective and joking moods while speaking to reporters about his decision. “If I do run into some emotions tomorrow or in four days, I don’t want people to think I’m a little unstable. Or more unstable,” Roddick said with a chuckle. “So that’s why I came to this decision.”His title in New York nine years ago was the last time an American man won a Grand Slam singles title, and Roddick spoke wistfully – as he often has in the past – about coming to the U.S. Open with his parents as a present when he turned 8.advertisementHe said he’s “been thinking about (retirement) for a little bit,” and knew for sure that the time now after his 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 first-round victory over 21-year-old American Rhyne Williams on Tuesday.”I’ve thought all year that I would know when I got to this tournament,” he said, “and when I played the first round, I knew.” In addition to winning his U.S. Open trophy, Roddick also played in four other Grand Slam finals – three at Wimbledon and one at the U.S. Open, losing to 17-time major champion Roger Federer each time. That included a 16-14 defeat in the fifth set at the All England Club in 2009, when Roddick was saluted by spectators who chanted his name at the end of the match. Buoyed by a booming serve – he used to hold the record of 155 mph – and big forehand, Roddick is 610-212 (a .742 winning percentage) with 32 titles, including two this year at Atlanta and Eastbourne, England. He also helped the United States end a 12-year David Cup drought by winning the 2007 title. “Look, he’s been our best player for many, many years. Do we love to have a guy like that out there? Sure. Was it great that he’s American? Sure,” said U.S. Tennis Association CEO Gordon Smith. “We could use another dozen Andy Roddicks, and we’re grateful for all he’s meant to American tennis, to the Davis Cup, to the U.S. Open.”Roddick’s announcement came one day after four-time major champion Kim Clijsters played the last singles match of her career, a second-round loss to Laura Robson at Flushing Meadows.”I haven’t done this before. I’m sure it’ll be very emotional. I’m sure I’ll still be nervous,” Roddick said, looking ahead to facing Tomic. “I don’t know.”He’s been dealing with a series of injuries over the past few seasons, and in February dropped out of the top 20, then slid to No. 34 in March, his lowest ranking since 2001.A hurt right hamstring forced Roddick to retire during his second-round match at the Australian Open in January, and he lost in the first round at the French Open and third round at Wimbledon.”With the way my body feels, with the way that I’m able to feel like I’m able to compete now, I don’t know that it’s good enough,” Roddick explained. “I don’t know that I’ve ever been someone who’s interested in `existing’ on tour. I have a lot of interests and a lot of other things that excite me. I’m looking forward to those.”He mentioned the youth tennis and learning center that his foundation is building in his hometown of Austin, Texas, and a radio show he appears on. The latter would seem to be a natural second career for Roddick, known for a sharp, often sarcastic, wit. He’s never been shy about showing his emotions on the court – whether tossing a racket or insulting a chair umpire or line judge – or sharing his opinions off it.advertisementRoddick grew up in the spotlight and the world watched him morph from a brash, Gen-X kid with plenty of `tude to something of an elder statesman in the game.He has spoken out about tennis players perhaps needing a union to fight for their rights the way athletes in U.S. team sports do, and he emerged as a mentor to younger Americans.Up-and-coming players such as Sam Querrey and Ryan Harrison have thanked Roddick publicly for his help, whether it’s offering advice about dealing with life on tour or inviting them to come train with him in Austin.”I was a little shocked. I think he kept it a very good secret,” the 20-year-old Harrison said about Roddick’s retirement.”Honestly, there were a lot of things he taught me, but probably the most important thing on the tennis front was the consistency of every day – every day, working, being out there, putting in time and effort. It’s 100 percent. … If you’re going to do it halfway, there’s no point in doing it at all. That’s what he taught me,” Harrison added. “That’s what he’s done throughout his career and that’s what he’s all about.”Constantly confronted with questions about why his generation wasn’t as successful as previous groups of American men – like Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi in the 1990s, or John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors before that – Roddick did his best to keep adapting his game to try to keep up with Federer, in particular, as well as Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.He improved his fitness. He added a better backhand. He worked on his volleys.Eventually, though, he found it too hard to stay at the level he once reached.”I don’t know that I want to disrespect the game by coasting home,” Roddick said. “I had plans to play a smaller schedule next year. But the more I thought about it, I think you’ve either got to be all in or not. That’s more kind of the way I’ve chosen to do things.”last_img
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