ONGC IOC ally to reduce carbon emission enhance oil recovery

first_imgNew Delhi: ONGC signed an MoU with IOCL for CO2 based Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) by injecting CO2 captured from IOCL’s Koyali refinery. The MOU is aimed to establish a framework for mutually beneficial cooperation in the area of CO2-EOR as a mode of CCUS. The common objective is to address some of the biggest challenges of our country in particular & world at large, namely energy security and climate change. It is a landmark event in the history of Indian Hydrocarbon Industry, with two its largest conglomerates agreeing to jointly work on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS). CCUS is known to be a very effective method of EOR globally and is playing an increasingly important role in achieving the mission of carbon neutrality. The idea of the MOU is to replicate the global success story in India. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!The collaboration under this MoU focuses on development of CO2 Capture plant at IOCL’s Koyali Refinery with appropriate Carbon capture technology, development of business model, increasing domestic oil production through CO2-EOR in Gandhar field and inclusion of this project as part of national emission curtailment measure aimed at supporting country’s low-carbon development goals. In order to replicate global success story of CO2-EOR from anthropogenic sources in India,the Institute of Reservoir Studies (IRS), ONGC has carried out laboratory and numerical simulation studies for Gandhar field. Technical feasibility of CO2-EOR has been established, and is indicative of incremental oil recovery of approximately10 %. The project will add up a new dimension towards national vision of CCUS and will infuse a new life to the depleted matured oil fields of ONGC. The learning curve from this endeavor shall create a knowledge base to further expand deployment of CCUS in India.last_img read more

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Camp Cloud numbers are small but tensions still simmering at Kinder Morgan

first_imgPipeline proponents, like federal Conservative MP Arnold Viersen, say Trans Mountain will bring jobs to First Nations communities. He represents 14 First Nations and three Metis settlements in his Peace River riding, “all of which have benefitted from the oil patch and forestry industry,” he said.“The industry coming in builds roads to the community, brings internet to the community, brings in power, water, provides construction jobs for roads, provides jobs for the actual servicing of the equipment that is up there, and so all of the communities in northern Alberta benefit immensely from having the oil patch and logging right in their backyards.”But Rose Deranger Desjarlais, who drove 19 hours from Fort McMurray to join the Camp Cloud group, said her home community of Fort Chipewyan has been destroyed by Alberta’s oilsands.“I am a victim of the tar sands,” she said.Up the road, a cedar watch-house offers a tiny glimpse into the fenced-in Kinder Morgan property. Despite the Texas-based company’s announcement that it would halt all non-essential spending, there’s still ongoing activity on the site. As recently as last week, Peter McCartney, of the Wilderness Committee, spotted trucks transporting pipes into Kinder Morgan’s New Westminster site.“It really put the fight into reality for me,” he said. “There’s this pipeline right here. It’s ready to be put into the ground in unceded territory where they do not have the consent of the First Nations.”Trucks are pictured carrying pipes travel into Kinder Morgan’s New Westminster site. Contributed/Peter McCartneyIn an emailed response, Kinder Morgan said some materials were ordered and in transit prior to the April 8 announcement that the company would halt all non-essential spending.“And some essential work that has already started may be continuing,” the statement reads.While the numbers have seemingly dwindled since Kinder Morgan’s announcement, Camp Cloud is physically growing.The site started as one trailer and expanded to a wooden enclosure filled with artwork and shelves of donated food. A handful of tents line the street, along with a small shelter recently built as a safe space for women and children.“If it’s downtime then we’ll fix the camp up and make sure that it’s ready for more people to come in … We’re always keeping track of what they’re doing at the same time,” said Bradley, eyeing another truck rolling up to the Kinder Morgan gate.Apart from volunteers, the odd passerby stops to ask questions, peeking over the “Stop Kinder Morgan” posters decorating the makeshift wooden frame.Camp Cloud started as one trailer but now includes several tents, shelves for donated food, artwork and a small wooden shelter for women and children. Lucy Scholey/APTNSome, like Burnaby resident Susan Cross, drop off food and firewood donations. Despite Trudeau’s claim that the Trans Mountain pipeline process has involved the “most extensive” consultation with First Nations communities ever, Cross said she takes issue with how Indigenous people have been “mistreated.”“When I’m watching the news, I’m just shaking my head constantly,” she said.Joe Ciccone, another Burnaby neighbour, recently walked past Camp Cloud with his dog and a couple of printed-off articles about Kinder Morgan for those occupying the encampment site.“These guys are the only hope for this bloody thing being stopped,” he said.lscholey@aptn.calhamelin@aptn.ca (“I am a victim of the tar sands, says Rose Deranger Desjarlais who drove 19 hours from Fort McMurray to join the Camp Cloud. Photo: Lucy Scholey/APTN)Lucy Scholey Laurie HamelinAPTN NewsJohnny Lee slams an axe into a piece of tree trunk, as the smell of fire wafts throughout the campsite near the gates of Kinder Morgan’s Burnaby Terminal, what has been ground zero for opposition to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.He’s one of a handful of anti-pipeline activists living at Camp Cloud, a surveillance site built to monitor the trucks rolling up to the construction zone every day. Other volunteers come and go, lending a hand to cook, chop wood or feed the sacred fire that has been burning for about 140 days.“They call us eco-terrorists for protecting the land and they’re the ones that are destroying it,” said Lee, who travelled from Edmonton for the cause. He said he will stay as long as it takes to stop the pipeline.Johnny Lee, from Edmonton, chops wood at Camp Cloud near Kinder Morgan’s construction site in Burnaby, B.C. on April 18, 2018. Lucy Scholey/APTNIt’s less than a week since Trudeau said he would use financial and legislative means to salvage the $7.4-billion Trans Mountain project, despite opposition from the B.C. government, the cities of Burnaby and Vancouver and First Nations.Since then, Alberta has tabled legislation aimed at reducing oil flows to B.C., sparking fears of spiked gas prices. Saskatchewan is now threatening to do the same.But some say the ultimate showdown will be here at Kinder Morgan’s gate – and along the pipeline route to Edmonton.“We’re here to stop it. That’s the bottom line,” said Dean Bradley, of Kwakiutl First Nation, who has been staying at Camp Cloud for almost a month, bundling up in two sleeping bags during the cold nights.Dean Bradley has been camping outside Kinder Morgan’s gate for almost a month. He says the pipeline project will be a “coastal killer.” He’s pictured here at Camp Cloud April 17, 2018. Lucy Scholey/APTNKinder Morgan has said 43 First Nation communities have signed mutual benefit agreements with the company, but a number of others have not, including Coldwater, B.C. Many fear irreparable environmental damage from oil spills and extracting more fossil fuels from Alberta’s oil sands. The Liberal government has pledged $1.5 billion to protect the country’s oceans from the project’s resulting increase in oil tankers along the west coast.Watch Laurie Hamelin’s story on Camp Cloudlast_img read more

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Morocco Does Not Need Your Lessons Nasser Bourita to Dutch Foreign

Rabat – During a working visit to Morocco on April 20, the Dutch Foreign Affairs Minister, Stef Blok, met with several Moroccan high officials, including his Moroccan counterpart Nasser Bourita.Speaking at a news conference at the end of the Dutch minister’s visit, Bourita and Blok both highlighted the strong and mutually beneficial bilateral relations between the two countries, citing the extradition agreement as an illustration of the strength and mutual confidence that characterizes the two countries’ diplomatic dealings.At one point during the news conference, however, Mr. Blok pointed out the unresponsiveness of Moroccan officials during the Rif uprisings, suggesting that the government and its apparatus had not been effective in responding to the grievances of the people who took to the streets. Mr. Bourita did not take kindly to the comment, quickly drawing the line between diplomatic and internal affairs. “[The situation in the Rif] is not a diplomatic question, and cannot be subject to a diplomatic discussion; it is an internal affair, and under no circumstances can it be dealt with through discussions or interaction with foreign states,” Bourita said.He further explained that Morocco has the legal, institutional, as well administrative means and structures to handle its issues. Freedom of expression and the right to demonstration are guaranteed by Moroccan law, Bourita stated, adding that these rights should be enjoyed within the framework defined by Morocco’s legal and institutional structures.“Morocco has a transparent legal system that ensures equity and equality before the law,” Bourita elaborated, hinting that if the relevant authorities conclude that there were abuses and violations during the Rif uprisings after due process, then Moroccan institutions will adequately respond to hold perpetrators accountable.Regarding the socio-economic aspects of the situation, the foreign affairs minister stressed the country’s recent economic reforms, especially massive investments in the historically-unprivileged and undeveloped regions. He stressed that Morocco’s current economic reforms involve all its regions, and the country has competent authorities to oversee and implement those reforms as expected. “Morocco does not need lessons from anyone, nor should discussions on this topic involve other countries,” he concluded. read more

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CannTrust preliminary estimates shows Q1 net revenue to more than double

VAUGHAN, Ont. — CannTrust Holdings Inc. says the company’s net revenue for its first full quarter after legalization of recreational cannabis will be $17 million, more than double what it was a year earlier.The cannabis producer says it hasn’t finalized its results for the quarter ended March 31 but preliminary estimates show net revenue will be up 116 per cent from $7.8 million in last year’s first quarter.The revenue during the three-month period is also expected to be five per cent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2018, when recreational use of cannabis by adults became legal in Canada.CannTrust says it harvested 9,424 kilograms of cannabis from its Niagara operations, up 96 per cent from the fourth quarter and that pricing for dry cannabis and oils was stable.Its adjusted loss before taxes and other expenses was estimated at between $3.5 million and $4.5 million, which is less than its fourth-quarter net loss of $8.5 million.The company had said in March that it expected adjusted EBITDA in the first quarter would be consistent with the fourth quarter of 2018.Companies in this story: (TSX:TRST)The Canadian Press read more

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Top UN official to visit Srebrenica on 10th anniversary of massacre

Mr. Malloch Brown will arrive in Srebrenica on 11 July, to attend a ceremony where he will deliver a message on behalf of the Secretary-General.Ahead of that solemn occasion, the Department of UN Peacekeeping Operations will host a discussion from 12:30 to 2pm in the Dag Hammarskjöld Auditorium, tomorrow in New York. Panellists will include, amongst others, Ambassador Diego Arria, former Venezuelan Ambassador to the UN, H.R.H. Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al-Hussein of Jordan, and Professor Samantha Power of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy of Harvard University. read more

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Mens swimming Ohio State set to swim backtoback dual meets

The OSU men’s swimming team practices leading up to meets against Michigan State and the University of Pittsburgh on Jan. 20 and 21. Credit: Sydney McNulty | Lantern reporterThe Ohio State men’s swimming team is set to compete in back-to-back dual meets this weekend, starting on Friday at Michigan State and continuing in Columbus on Saturday, hosting the University of Pittsburgh.The Buckeyes head to East Lansing, Michigan, after a dominant performance against Cincinnati, setting three pool records at Keating Aquatic Center.Carrying that momentum is vital heading into a double header, graduate senior Josh Fleagle said.“It’s definitely not easy,” he said. “We just take it one practice at a time, one meet at a time and we look forward to new challenges, competition and we love racing.”It will be a quick turnaround, but Fleagle believes the team’s experience will give the Buckeyes an upper hand.“When we go to Big Tens and NCAAs, it’s four or five days of just swimming,” he said. “So two days isn’t that bad, granted we will get back a little bit later on Friday from Michigan State. But we are pretty used to it.”The Buckeyes will swim against the Spartans for the first time this season. Senior Matt McHugh said the results of the meet will give some insight into the team’s level of conditioning.“It’ll be good to see how we go up against Michigan State in a dual meet,” he said. “It’s a good indication to see where we need to improve, and what events we need to put certain people in.”In facing both a conference and a out of conference opponent this weekend, the Buckeyes are keeping the same mindset: competition is competition, said Fleagle.“I think right now the positivity is really up and obviously, the goal is to get best times in everything we do,” he said.Competition is scheduled to start at 5 p.m. on Friday and at noon on Saturday. read more

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Rio Tintos first delivery of iron ore with worlds largest robot

first_imgRio Tinto has achieved a significant milestone with the first delivery of iron ore by an autonomous train in the Pilbara, Western Australia. The train, consisting of three locomotives and carrying around 28,000 t of iron ore, travelled over 280 km from Rio Tinto’s mining operations in Tom Price to the port of Cape Lambert on July 10. It was monitored remotely by operators from Rio Tinto’s Operations Centre in Perth more than 1,500 km away.The inaugural journey is a significant milestone for Rio Tinto’s AutoHaul program and follows regulatory approval in May. AutoHaul is on schedule to complete by the end of the year, unlocking significant safety and productivity gains for the business, as well as optimising the company’s iron ore system by providing more flexibility and reducing bottlenecks.Rio Tinto Iron Ore managing director Rail, Port & Core Services Ivan Vella said “The safe first delivery of iron ore by an autonomous train is a key milestone for AutoHaul. The program will deliver the world’s first fully autonomous, long-distance, heavy-haul rail network, operating the world’s largest and longest robots.“This program symbolises both the pioneering spirit and innovative talents of many people across Rio Tinto and shows our absolute commitment to improving safety and productivity, as well as enabling greater flexibility across our operations.“We will continue to ensure our autonomous trains operate safely under the wide range of conditions we experience in the Pilbara, where we record more than eight million kilometres of train travel each year.“We are working closely with drivers during this transition period as we prepare our employees for new ways of working as a result of automation.”The A$940 million AutoHaul program is focused on automating trains transporting iron ore to Rio Tinto’s port facilities in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Once commissioned, the network will be the world’s first heavy haul, long distance autonomous rail operation.Rio Tinto operates about 200 locomotives on more than 1,700 km of track in the Pilbara, transporting ore from 16 mines to four port terminals.The average return distance of these trains is about 800 km with the average journey cycle, including loading and dumping, taking about 40 hours.Locomotives carrying AutoHaul software are fitted with on-board cameras allowing for constant monitoring from the Operations Centre. All public rail crossings on the network are fitted with CCTV cameras and have been upgraded to the highest safety standards.last_img read more

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Two teens charged over Rialto stabbing

first_imgTWO TEENAGERS HAVE been charged over a stabbing last December, and will appear before the court this morning.Gardaí in Kilmainham investigating a fatal stabbing incident and serious assault on 1 December 2012 on St Anthony’s Rd outside Herberton Apartments in Rialto Dublin 8 arrested two males (aged 16 and 19) this morning in the Dublin 8 area.The teens were brought to Kilmainham Garda station where they were both charged in connection with the incident. They will appear before the Juvenile Court in Smithfield at 10.30am this morning.The stabbing occurred at around 5.30am on 1 December last year when an altercation between a number of youths resulted in two males in their 20s receiving stab injuries. Both victims were taken to St James Hospital where one man, a German native, was later pronounced dead.Read: Gardaí arrest fourth person over fatal Rialto stabbing>Read: Three released over Rialto stabbing>last_img read more

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AIB made a pretax profit of €437 million in the first half

first_imgAIB HAS ANNOUNCED pre-tax profits of €437 million for the first half of 2014.That figure represents a €1.3 billion improvement on the first half of 2013, with the bank saying that their funding and capital positions are “stable and improving”.The profit comes on the back of a 36% rise in income to €1.25 billion and a drop in expenses of 9%.In their half yearly statement, released this morning, AIB says that it approved a total of around €5.6 billion in lending in the first half of the year, a 33% increase on the same period in 2013.Impaired loans have also decreased, by 10% on the end of 2013 and the total number of accounts in arrears in the Irish residential mortgage portfolio declined by 6%.AIB CEO David Duffy says the bank had achieved its goal of returning to profitability this year.“AIB has achieved its stated aim of returning to sustainable profitability on a post provision basis in 2014 with our half year results reflecting strong improvements in margins, funding position and capital ratios. The group has demonstrated its capacity to support economic recovery with loan approvals, including the UK, of around €5.6 billion, up 33% year on year.“Our mortgage arrears and overall levels of impaired loans are reducing and our performance in the first half of the year saw a material reduction in provision charges.  As the Irish economy and the bank recovers, we remain focused on growth and maximising value for the Irish State, as 99.8% shareholder, and all other stakeholders over time.”Read: Ulster Bank is shutting down another ten branchesRead: Angela Merkel’s ‘Dr No’ makes Ireland’s search for a bank debt deal much harderlast_img read more

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Adobe Flash runs abysmally on Googles Cr48 Chrome OS notebook

first_imgAdobe can’t seem to catch a break when it comes to their Flash player plug-in lately. Apple hates it and has gone as far as to announce that they won’t be shipping it pre-installed on any future Macs (understandable, considering how the new MacBook Air ekes out approximately 20% more battery life just by leaving it uninstalled), and even though it runs on some Android handsets, it’s slow, buggy and battery intensive.You’d think Adobe might have caught a break with the release of Google‘s first Chrome OS notebook, the Cr-48. After all, the Chrome web browser, upon which Chrome OS is based, comes with Flash Player integrated… but as it turns out, Flash Player performance under the Cr-48 is abysmal. According to many Cr-48 owners, Adobe Flash Player 10.1 on the Cr-48 barely runs YouTube videos at 480p, and Hulu is only barely watchable. Adobe, on their part, is claiming that “Flash Player 10.1 support remains a work in progress” under Chrome OS, but honestly, Adobe, this needs to stop being your fallback excuse. You’ve got a public relations problem with Flash performance these days, and the constant stream of stories of yet another new product that Flash runs terribly on isn’t helping things… especially when HTML5 works on those same machines just fine.Read more at Adobelast_img read more

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Sharp launches worlds largest LED TV the 70inch LC70LE732U

first_imgHDTVs just got bigger thanks to Sharp’s announcement today of its new 70-inch LED LCD TV. Topping the previous max of 65 inches, the LC-70LE732U now takes the role of world’s largest LED-based TV. We really hope it’s used with the world’s smallest digital TV tuner that Sharp developed in June.The TV, which actually measures 69.5 inches across, offers 62 percent more viewing area than a 55-inch TV, according to Sharp. It’s apparently equal to nine 19-inch TVs placed next to each other. The Sharp LC-70LE732U will give you 2,088 square inches of screen.AdChoices广告Besides screen size, the HDTV offers Sharp’s proprietary Quattron technology, which basically adds an extra pixel, a yellow sub pixel, to the normal red, green, and blue pixels. The TV features a 120Hz refresh rate, and a 6 million: 1 dynamic contrast ratio.As with most TVs coming out these days, the LC-70LE732U offers streaming services, like Netflix, VUDU, CinemaNow, and Pandora, and web apps like Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr. It also includes built-in WiFi, so you won’t need an adapter to use its AQUOS Advantage Live onscreen customer service feature.LG is said to be releasing a 72-inch LCD TV, but, until then, Sharp will remain the King of the Giant TVs.The LC-70LE732U will run you $3,799, and there will be three more 70-inch models, including a 3D version, later this year.Read more at Sharp, via CEProlast_img read more

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France la téléphonie mobile compte plus de 61 millions de clients

first_imgFrance : la téléphonie mobile compte plus de 61 millions de clientsFrance – L’Autorité de régulation des télécoms, ou Arcep, a annoncé mardi 3 août que le nombre de clients de la téléphonie mobile avait légèrement augmenté entre avril et juin, après avoir stagné entre janvier et mars 2010.Les Français sont 61,9 millions à être clients de la téléphonie mobile, soit une légère augmentation par rapport au premier trimestre 2010. Cette hausse représente 389.500 appareils mobiles en plus sur le marché, ce qui amène à un taux d’équipement de la population de 95,8% explique l’AFP. Une bonne nouvelle pour le marché de la téléphonie mobile, alors qu’au premier trimestre 2010, le nombre de clients avait légèrement reculé pour la première fois depuis 2002. L’Arcep explique également que le système des cartes prépayées connaît un recul certain depuis quelques mois, a contrario des forfaits mobiles. Du côté des opérateurs virtuels, c’est-à-dire ceux qui louent du réseau aux trois grands opérateurs SFR, Bouygues Telecom ou Orange, la part de marché a légèrement augmenté, mais leur progression diminue. Lors de ce second trimestre 2010, 23,5 milliards de SMS ont été échangés en France, soit 135 messages par mois et par client précise l’Agence France Presse. Le 4 août 2010 à 12:56 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Grand Bahama tourism troubled new reports threaten winter renovations

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews, freeport Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, August 23, 2017 – Grand Bahama – Reports are surfacing now and it points to a very fluid situation for the Lucayan Strip in Grand Bahama when it comes to holding down a new investor for the floundering tourism district.    One publication reports that the Wynn Group of Canada which had signed an agreement with the Perry Christie Administration may abort mission; telling the Nassau Guardian that their agreement was a phase one document, which needed a phase two and that the transformation for the Lucayan Strip has to be thorough.It is unclear why all of a sudden, it seems the Wynn Group wants to reportedly walk away from the table and a deal which had renovations for the strip set to start by winter season.   Wynn went as far as to explain that they and the government have the same viewpoint on how to deal with the development and said their Letter of Intent signed just before the May 2017 General Elections was to bring in good operators for the hotel strip.  Still it is unclear, even from the Government what is going on.Last night a cryptic statement was issued, we shared it with you this morning and it said that discussions were productive and that government was resolute about getting Grand Bahama back on track, economically.    Another media report has it being confirmed that Sunwing and Memories, who dropped Freeport in February after a major dispute over hurricane repairs with Hutchison Whompoa are still interested and are trying to get Hardrock Cafe to take over casino operations with a move to Lighthouse Point.Everyone agrees there is potential, that a cycle has to be broken in the #Freeport tourism market but when and where and how and who will make it happen specifically are being held close to the breast, at least for now by the FNM Government and other stakeholders.    The Government however did promise in their statement on Grand Bahama overnight that, “further announcements are due shortly.”#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Freeport Man Killed in ‘The Ghetto’, Homicide Count Now At 100 Bahamas Govt bids to buy Lucayan Strip resorts, PM Minnis tours site Heavy rain flooding Grand Bahama homes, senior citizens call for Govt helplast_img read more

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Public art project unveiled in Parkland aims to heal community

first_imgThe artwork is accompanied by a video and pamphlet where visitors can learn more about each individual scroll.Now, hundreds of people have a symbol of healing that they can share with the world.“It was a very special, very bonding experience,” said Hunschofsky.The project will be up in the Parkland Recreation and Enrichment Center for the next year.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. The concept is a way for participants to think about what they value in life, and in this case, a way to help a grieving community heal.“One of the participants from the community named their independent work of art ‘Growth and Strength’ because they said this community has been torn into a million pieces, but slowly the strength is rebuilding this community,” said Steven, “so the name of the collaborative artwork became ‘Growth and Strength.’”The art project brought nearly 1,000 people together to showcase their artistic side for two weeks, including MSD students.“It was really great to be around the students and see them taking this to heart,” said Hunschofsky.Each scroll means something different to the creators, who all got to share what it means to them with others who made one.“Sometimes in a healing process you can feel very alone,” said Hunschofsky, “and a project like this brings people together, allows them to share their story so that they know they’re all in this together and that they’re healing together.”The project is the second of five public art pieces honoring the victims of the tragic Parkland school shooting, the first being the Temple of Time, which was ceremoniously burned in May. PARKLAND, FLA. (WSVN) – A second public art project in a series aiming to bring the community together after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was unveiled this weekend.The project, titled “Growth and Strength,” debuted Saturday at the Parkland Recreation and Enrichment Center.“Every scroll that you see as part of this art project was done by a member of the community,” said Parkland Mayor Christine Hunschofsky.Artists and brothers Steven and William Ladd worked with Stoneman Douglas students in order to provide an outlet for them to heal and unite.“We reached over 900 people in this community. Each person made their own work of art that they got to keep,” said William. “They collaborated on a work of art that you see behind us, ‘Growth and Strength.’”The brothers are from New York and travel the country to help communities express themselves through the art form called “scrollathon.”The artists brought the “scrollathon” project to Parkland and Coral Springs back in April. last_img read more

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Number of complaints against South Peninsula Hospital dept manager grows

first_img 1 of 3 Wilke explains that it was the #MeToo movement that pushed her to report the alleged incident to Homer Police back in October.“It was like a punch in the gut because I realized that by me not saying anything to anybody and letting him get away with this, that I had left the door open for other women to be abused and harassed by Douglas Westphal,” Wilke said. “I went to the police, and all along I have known that I have no legal recourse.”Police declined to charge Westphal. Investigating officer Larry Baxter said the alleged incident did not rise to the level of sexual assault and that the statute of limitations had expired for any potential lower level crimes.Wilke followed up with the hospital’s HR department in November, the third complaint made to HR staff since 2016. Later that month, the hospital responded to Wilke with a certified letter explaining that the hospital spoke with “appropriate staff” and that SPH reviewed its training material on sexual harassment and physical therapy treatment.There was no mention of action taken against Westphal. Wilke questioned SPH’s response in an email, arguing she had been a victim of a crime.“Is he still practicing. Is he still doing this?” she asked. “You can do whatever you want. You can train a man. You can put him through seminars. That doesn’t fix what he’s done and what he will continue to do.”The hospital responded that it had “nothing further to add.”“I felt ignored, not taken seriously, re-traumatized,” Wilke said. “I felt lost, scared. I didn’t know where else I’d be able to turn.”Wilke said both during therapy and at work that Westphal also repeatedly asked if he could hypnotize her, allegedly saying, “look into the violet flame.” According to Westphal’s bio on the hospital’s website, he became a master clinical hypnotist in 2011.According to documents provided by Wilke, she filed a complaint with the state Division of Corporations, Business and Professional Licensing against Westphal’s physical and occupational therapist license. Wilke filed the complaint after Westphal returned to work in January.The division’s Chief Investigator, Greg Francois, confirmed that Wilke filed the complaint and said the division has an “inquiry” into the matter, which precedes an official investigation that could come with consequences such as Westphal losing his license.Homer News published an article about the allegations on May 16, saying that Francois confirmed there was an “active investigation involving Westphal’s license.” KBBI later determined from Francois’ statement and the division policies he provided that the complaint had not moved onto the investigative phase.During the “inquiry” process, the division typically obtains records, documentation and evidence related to the complaint and performs preliminary interviews before determining whether to move forward with an “official investigation.”KBBI also confirmed that two additional complaints against Westphal were filed with the division. According to the division’s website, no prior actions have been taken against Westphal’s license.There are also three active grievances with the local union, General Teamsters 959. Union President Barbara Huff Tuckness said none have been resolved.“We have one at the arbitration level with attempts to try to reach some sort of resolution and we have two other cases that will be going towards that arbitration level, assuming we don’t get those resolved,” Tuckness said.Sarah Bollwitt, who currently works as an occupational therapist for the hospital, is one of the women who filed a union grievance. Bollwitt said she kept tabs on her interactions with Westphal dating back to her second day of work in April of 2015. She said Westphal made a comment about her being more attractive “than her Facebook photo would suggest,” and she said his comments became increasingly inappropriate during the three years she worked under him.“I told him I had a miscarriage and I couldn’t work at the health fair, and he told me, ‘What were you thinking having sex without a condom?’” Bollwitt recalled. “That’s when I started keeping track because I know that you’re not supposed to talk to your employees like that. No one should be made to feel disrespected on top of already being devastated.”Bollwitt says that alleged incident happened in late 2015. She says she kept a running list of similar instances over the next two years before she handed the list over to Chief Nursing Officer Von Kilpatrick and Risk Management Nurse Dawn Johnson in December.Bollwitt’s complaint was forwarded onto the HR department. She filed her grievance with the union in January and transferred to another department.Several other women have come forward to the HR department, including former traveling physical therapist Lora Harroff. Harroff started working at the hospital in March of 2017. She said her first interaction with Westphal was in the HR office on her first day of work.“I got my badge, and I put it on my collar and this man, who was Douglas, came into the HR department,” Harroff explained. “He walked up to me and brushed my hair off of my shoulder.”Harroff says Westphal then grabbed her badge off of her collar.“I was kind of very confused. I look up at him and he said, ‘Oh, you’re Lora. You must be Lora. I’m Douglas,” Harroff said.Harroff said Westphal regularly made inappropriate remarks about her body, including an instance when Westphal allegedly made her to do a squat in front of other staff after making a comment about her “glutes.”Harroff formally complained to HR in August after she said she confronted him earlier that summer. She said HR facilitated a meeting with Westphal, but she said he was unapologetic.“I mean at that point I felt like kind of powerless because there’s nothing else I could do except for encouraging other people come forward,” Harroff said.Harroff finished her short stint as a traveling therapist at the hospital in September.Other women said they suffered a constant barrage of negative comments from Westphal. Amber Rogers started as a traveling physical therapist in 2013 and later became a permanent employee. She said Westphal made negative comments about her getting sick and other health conditions she had. Rodgers said he also belittled her about her work performance and religion.“The more he belittled me and said these comments to me, the more I was becoming depressed, and then my health started getting worse because I honestly was fearful to come to work,” Rogers said. “I hated going to work because I did not want to see him.”Susan Cates-Blackmon said she found another job in the Pacific Northwest as a speech therapist largely because of her negative experience working with Westphal.Cates-Blackmon filed a formal grievance with the union when she secured her next job three months after she gave her notice. Her husband, David Blackmon, who worked as a rehabilitation aid in the department, said he also filed a grievance with the union.Multiple women who spoke with KBBI also said they quit because of Westphal.Although, the hospital’s internal investigation is over, hospital spokesperson Ferraro said SPH is still working with the Division of Professional Licensing. Ferraro said the hospital is handling another complaint against Westphal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which enforces civil rights laws involving workplace discrimination.Both Ferraro and hospital CEO Woodin say they take the women’s complaints seriously, but Woodin, who started his position in March, said the hospital was surprised by the allegations.“He did have a 25-year track record of working at the hospital with no prior complaints,” Woodin said. “I can tell you that with great confidence that there wasn’t concerns expressed 10 years ago.”Like Wilke, most of the women say the hospital’s communication with them about the investigation into Westphal was poor, and they say beyond Westphal’s demotion, they were left guessing about how their complaints were handled.Woodin said the hospital can’t disclose every aspect of its investigation to employees and the public.“I think there’s definitely some lessons learned with regards to the feedback and the timeliness and responding to some of these things,” Woodin said.Ferraro added that the hospital has no concerns about Westphal’s professional practice and that he will continue treating patients.“If the hospital had concerns, he would not be practicing there,” Ferraro said.Others have spoken in support of Westphal, including five women who submitted letters to the hospital’s board of directors in December, according to meeting minutes. KBBI requested those letters, but the request was denied.Sarah Bollwitt acknowledges others have stated they had no problems with Westphal.“The fact that although plenty of people have had only positive interactions with this person, it doesn’t negate his inappropriate behavior with me and with others,” Bollwitt said.Bollwitt and others say they came forward to make sure that their experiences aren’t repeated.Despite the hospital demoting Westphal, several of the women still say he should be removed completely.It’s unclear when other inquiries into allegations against Westphal will conclude and what possible actions could be taken against him.This story contained contributions from Renee Gross with KBBI in Homer. Lora Wilke police report South Peninsula Hospital. (Photo courtesy of South Peninsula Hospital)Several women have brought forth allegations against a South Peninsula Hospital department manager in Homer, describing an environment of bullying and sexual harassment.Listen nowThe allegations against Douglas Westphal, the former director of the hospital’s rehab department, also include one instance of alleged sexual assault. Complaints have also been filed with the state Division of Professional Licensing, the local union and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.Westphal returned to work in a non-managerial role in January following an internal investigation, but several of the women say they want Westphal fired.One woman who made a complaint against Westphal came forward to KBBI in February, alerting the station about six other complaints. KBBI later became aware of an additional complaint made by department staff.The complaints date back to the fall of 2016, most of which were made to the hospital’s HR department between August of 2017 and the end of the year. Six of the eight women and department staff spoke with KBBI on the record.Allegations range from unsolicited shoulder rubs to threatening to turn on decommissioned security cameras in areas where female staff change clothes. Others say Westphal repeatedly disclosed patients’ personal information to staff and made negative comments about female staff’s medical conditions, pregnancies and financial situations.South Peninsula Hospital spokesperson Derotha Ferraro confirmed that there were a number of complaints.“There was an investigation based on employee concerns,” Ferraro said. “That investigation happened, and that investigation ended.”Westphal acknowledged the investigation in an email to KBBI in April.“I appreciate the severity of the allegations that are currently being investigated thoroughly by South Peninsula Hospital,” Westphal wrote. “I have been fully cooperative with the investigation and will continue to do so.”Hospital CEO Joseph Woodin and Ferraro confirmed that Westphal was put on administrative leave before he was demoted to his current position as a physical therapist in January.But the women say the hospital’s response was inadequate. The most serious allegation comes from Lora Wilke, a former registered nurse at the hospital who left in 2011. Wilke said she was seeing Westphal as a patient in 2009 following knee surgery. She said Westphal encouraged her to take two “Vicodin” pills prior to her session. Wilke said Westphal then gave her a large pair of shorts before escorting her to a private treatment area.“I lay down on a gurney, and he covered me with a blanket,” Wilke said. “The curtains were closed, and he proceeded to come up the leg of my shorts reaching toward my underwear. I would say that by the time I pushed his hand away, he had pretty much his whole hand in my shorts, and his fingers were about a centimeter away from my underwear.”Wilke said she continued her treatment with Westphal and that all subsequent treatments were performed in an open area.center_img South Peninsula Hospital’s response to Lora Wilke’s complaint Lora Wilke’s response to South Peninsula Hospital’s November letterlast_img read more

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Walker administration doubles down as cybersecurity experts warn of Chinas threat to

first_imgStaff from Alaska Gov. Bill Walker’s office greet employees of the Bank of China during a trade mission stop at the bank’s headquarters on May 25, 2018, in Beijing, China. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/Alaska’s Energy Desk)When researchers at Recorded Future found evidence of Chinese surveillance of networks in Alaska — they weren’t exactly looking for it.Listen nowInstead, the companies’ data scientists, intelligence analysts and engineers were trying to figure out what a compromised network in Tibet was being used for.“Well that kind of led us down sort of this other rabbit hole that takes us to the rest of the report which is what we see as malicious activity that’s coming from this university in China, Tsinghua, which is essentially the equivalent of China like MIT, you could say,” Priscilla Moriuchi said. She’s the Director of Strategic Threat Development and supervises the team at Recorded Future that put out a report on the surveillance.The report details evidence that computers at Tsinghua University in Beijing were being used to gather information on networks in Kenya, Brazil, Mongolia and Alaska.In Alaska, the report documents over one million connections between the Chinese university and several networks in the state including the Alaska Communications Systems Group, or ACS, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources and the State of Alaska Government.There’s no evidence that any of those connections successfully penetrated a network in Alaska — no evidence of a successful hack.When reports of the scanning activity were made public, a spokesperson from Governor Bill Walker’s office said it was routine anonymous activity. Basically, someone checking to see if the doors are locked on Alaska’s networks.Moriuchi disagrees.“There are computers and networks that literally do only one thing and that is scan every single person’s computer that’s connected to the Internet looking for vulnerabilities.  That’s, sort of, one type of scanning which is like … checking to see if the doors are locked,” Moriuchi said. “This is a much different type of scanning. We would actually refer to it more like reconnaissance which is this type of scanning that is very targeted… so it’s a bit more than just checking to see if the front door is locked, right? It’s like knocking on all the windows, looking at your security system, poking around in the sand around your house… also doing it while you’re not home and they know you’re not going to be home.”Moriuchi says the scanning was very targeted and pointed at a specific number of ports in Alaska networks that are exploitable.“So, it’s highly focused, very, very high volume, extensive and very peculiar,” Moriuchi said. “Tailored right to these Alaskan network vulnerabilities that the Chinese actors were looking for.”Walker’s administration is also doubling down on the idea that those scans may not have come from China.When reached via text on Friday, Walker’s press secretary Austin Baird wrote that no one from the state’s office of information technology was available to talk about the issue and that Walker’s administration still does not believe that the surveillance came from China.Moriuchi and other cyber-security experts are questioning the wisdom of ignoring signs that someone in China is attempting to spy on Alaska.Moriuchi said there’s no question that the scanning came from the Chinese university. What isn’t clear, she said, is whether it came from university students or, at the behest of the Chinese government.“People will say that ‘university students do all kinds of things on the university networks.’ And you know, ‘how is it possible that you could suspect that this would be a Chinese kind of state-sponsored activity,’” Moriuchi said.Moriuchi says the timing of the scans — between April 6 and June 24 – indicates that Alaska was targeted before and after Walker’s trade mission to China in late May.At the Washington D.C.-based nonprofit Center for Democracy and Technology, Chief Technologist Joseph Lorenzo Hall said it is common for this type of scanning to originate from China. Usually, he said, it is followed up with attacks on the networks.“And you know it seems a little dismissive of the Alaskan government to say, ‘we’re not even sure this is from China.’ If you know Recorded Future and other folks like that have global infrastructure that can see certain kinds of data flows and they drop in that report,” Hall said. “The actual IP addresses … you can look for yourself and see that that IP address is allocated matching Tsinghua University.”Hall said the state should dig deeper and make sure there weren’t any successful hacks.“You know, while I can imagine the Alaska government saying, ‘hey, nothing to see here whatever from the PR perspective.’ I really hope at the same time they’re going back and looking at logs and stuff from that time period,” Hall said.Both Hall and Moriuchi said Alaska should be vigilant against further attempts at surveillance, especially as it continues commercial negotiations with China to build a natural gas pipeline.“So while this is not a way of telling Alaska that your network has certainly been victimized, it’s a good indicator and we were kind of putting it out there to warn the state government that you guys, just in case you didn’t know … the state government is a target for Chinese hackers,” Moriuchi said.last_img read more

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GoAir sale of tickets at just Rs 1199 has customers reeling

first_imgGoAir flight. (Representational Image)Wikimedia CommonsLow-cost airline GoAir has announced a massive two-day sale beginning Thursday, January 3. It is offering all-inclusive flight tickets at Rs 1,199 between major cities like Pune, Ahmedabad, Chandigarh, Mumbai, Patna, Bengaluru, Delhi, Goa, Hyderabad, Ranchi, Kolkata, Lucknow, Nagpur and Chennai.The cheapest ticket is priced at Rs 1,199 from Chennai to Port Blair in Andaman and Nicobar Islands.Some of the routes are Goa-Mumbai (Rs 1,499; travel period: July 15 to September 8), Patna-Kolkata (Rs 1,299; travel period: July 1 to September 8), Goa-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20), Goa-Hyderabad (Rs 1,399; travel period: July 1 to September 15), Hyderabad-Bengaluru (Rs 1,499; travel period: January 18 to February 20).Interested customers can go to the company’s website and buy their tickets under the ‘Fly Smart, Save Big’ category.In December 2018, GoAir had offered all-inclusive tickets priced at Rs 1,499 for trips between April 1, 2019, and June 30, 2019.last_img read more

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Ancient Babylonian Artifact Seized at London Airport Returns to Iraq

first_imgBritish officials intercepted an artifact smuggler at Heathrow airport who was attempting to sneak a valuable ancient stone into the UK. The smuggler claimed the object was for “home decoration.” The 12-inches-high artifact is dated to the second millennia BC. It’s a unique item inscribed with cuneiform text and is believed to have been illegally excavated from an archaeological site in southern Iraq. Albeit the stone has been damaged, its value as a rare historical item secures it a place on museum shelves.Heathrow airport, London, UKAccording to the Guardian, who reported the story on March 10, 2019, the suspicions of a border control officer were raised by a package which was, according to the customs declaration, a “carved stone for home decoration” originating from Turkey. It also declared a cost of “300” but no currency was mentioned.With the help of the British Museum, it was confirmed the object in the package was a Kudurru, or boundary stone, from ancient Babylon. These important stones served as official documentation of a grant of land by a king. Not many of these survive today and they are valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars.Babylonian kudurru of the late Kassite period found near Baghdad by the French botanist André MichauxBritannica.com writes that, in ancient Babylonian times: “The original kudurrus were kept in temples, while clay copies were given to the landowners. On the stone were engraved the clauses of the contract, the images or symbols of the gods under whose protection the gift was placed, and the curse on those who violated the rights conferred.”The word kudurru translates to “frontier” or “boundary”. The kudurru inscriptions were the equivalent of land registration records, setting out the limits of the estate, as well as privileges granted to the land-owner. They were principally used during the period of Kassite rule in Babylonia, between the 16th and 12th centuries BC.Babylonian KudurruVery few archaeological artifacts are known to have survived from this era, and kudurrus are “in many cases the only documents of their period which have come down to us,” according to the British Museum. In addition to the importance of the text, such as references to Babylonian kings and historical events, they were carved were carved with animals, weapons and other symbols representing “the principal stars and constellations known to the Babylonians.” Such astral symbols were precursors to the zodiac.Babylonian Kudurru – clay tabletThe kudurru recovered at the London airport is broken and not everything on it is clearly legible. However, it is still considered to be a museum-quality piece.The cuneiform stone has been associated with the relatively unknown Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar I, who ruled circa 1126-1103 BC.Nebuchadnezzar I notably defeated the Elamites, his kingdom’s enemies, successfully annexing their capital Susa — a city later famed as the administrative capital of Darius the Great of Persia.Babylonian Kudurru – inscribed clay tabletsThe recently retrieved kudurru has two columns of text which are difficult to decipher since a portion is missing some parts are worn out. What’s certain is that the stone artifact refers to some sort of military effort — perhaps the one king Nebuchadnezzar I led against the Elamites.Dr. St John Simpson from the British Museum told the Guardian, “It’s a historical document, a primary document for a little-known episode of Mesopotamian history, showing the relationship – not always friendly – between neighbours.”Text from the Kassite era Land grant to Marduk-zākir-šumi kudurruSimpson also said: “The text mentions the god Enlil and the goddess Gula and refers several times to the city of Nippur, in southern Iraq, where Enlil was the chief god. This makes it quite likely that this kudurru originates from Nippur or its close vicinity.”It is further considered that the stone object was illegally excavated more than 15 years ago when a number of archaeological sites in Iraq were looted as war and conflict prevailed.Illustration of KuduruThe British Museum is due to hand over the kudurru to the Iraqi embassy in London on March 19th, after which the ancient artifact will be flown to Baghdad.Read another story from us: Scientists Reawaken Cells from a 28,000-yr-old Woolly MammothThis is not the first time Britain has returned artifacts belonging to Iraq. Several objects, previously seized by police officers from a London-based dealer, were handed back to the Middle East country in 2018. The situation with looting, which was a huge issue in Iraq at the time, has seen significant improvements over the past decade.last_img read more

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On the Road 5 Classic American Road Trips Taken by 5 Famous

first_imgSome great literary figures of the past have embarked on some classic road trips throughout the USA. The image of the open road has something quintessentially American about it. Perhaps nowhere else in the world is the road trip as romanticized as it is in the States. And rightly so. There is a long lineage of famous road trips undertaken by giants of literature which have become embedded deep into the culture and landscape. And for many, literary road trips re-creating the classic journeys of famous writers, holds great appeal. CarRentals.com even offers routes to some of the most famous (some may say infamous) road trips across North America, inspired by well-known works of literature. “A  journey by car is a different kind of travel, providing a freeing feeling where you can call all of the shots,” said CarRentals. “Many authors who have written classic literary novels aren’t all that different, with stories exploring national parks, new cities, and cultural events.”Image credit: CarRentals.comOne of the most famous road trips of the last century was depicted in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. In 1954 Kerouac had a vision in a Massachusetts church that told him the real meaning of “Beat” was “Beatific,” converting alienation into spiritual transcendence. On the Road, first published in 1957, introduced “the Beat generation.” In this novel of life on the road, Dean Moriarty and Sal Paradise, Kerouac’s fictional alter ego, search for ecstasy, taking them from New York City to San Francisco and in one final trip down into Mexico, getting their kicks from all-night talk sessions, drunken parties, orgies, and an exploration of jazz. Behind the wheels of numerous automobiles, the two young men zigzag across the continent “leaving confusion and nonsense behind and performing [their] one and noble function of the time, move.”Image credit: CarRentals.comA far earlier road trip was that of F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, in 1920. Seeking the feeling of hope and freedom of the open road, the Jazz Age couple set out on a 1,500-mile road trip from Connecticut to Alabama, Zelda’s native state, in an automobile they dubbed the “Rolling Junk.” It was a 1200-mile quest for the biscuits and peaches Zelda missed in her home in the north. In a 1934 letter to his editor Max Perkins, Fitzgerald described it as “a long, supposedly humorous account of an automobile journey.”Image credit: CarRentals.comZen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, published in 1974, takes a different tone. It is the story of a man and his son who go on a motorcycle trip from Minnesota to California, choosing the back roads and sleeping overnight in motels or camping. “On another level, it’s a dense philosophical look into the conflict between romantic and classical thinking,” wrote one admirer. “Along the way the author explains his search for and belief in quality as a unifying force. He uses the trip and the characters in the book as metaphors to discuss philosophy.”Image Credit: CarRentals.comTom Wolfe’s book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test is often celebrated as the starting point of the psychedelic 1960s. The story follows Ken Kesey and his band of followers, the Merry Pranksters, as they drive a painted bus across the country under the influence of drugs, eclectic music and multimedia experiences to transcend reality and bring a higher state of consciousness during the height of the counterculture. Their trip travels across the country from California to New York, north to Canada and back again.Image Credit: CarRentals.comBut perhaps the wildest road trip of all was that of Hunter S. Thompson. His book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas drew from two magazine assignments, one from Rolling Stone and the other from Sports Illustrated. The story follows its protagonist, Raoul Duke, and his attorney, Dr. Gonzo, from Los Angeles to Las Vegas. This cult classic of gonzo journalism is the best chronicle of drug-soaked, addle-brained good times ever written. It is also the tale of a long weekend road trip that has gone down in the annals of American pop culture as one of the strangest journeys ever undertaken.Related Article: Psychedelic Celebrity Cars of the 1960sThe Great American Literary Road Trip is a wonderful part of the history and heritage of the USA. If you’d like to learn more about these classic road trips and discover more routes please visit the CarRentals blog as well as their site: carrentals.comlast_img read more

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Value Medicine Radiologys Big Chance

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first blog in a four-part series on patient centricity.  Videos | AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McColl… read more Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | Radiology Imaging| July 07, 2016 Value Medicine: Radiology’s Big Chance Video Player is loading.Sudhen Desai explains how deep learning might assist pediatric imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:21Loaded: 1.95%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. No “I” In TEAMKnowing when and where radiologists fit in will require an expansion of the “team” concept, specifically as it pertains to medical practice. When medical images provide the meat of a conversation between a GP and a provider of therapy — and diagnosis is not an issue — radiologists don’t have a place. But when radiologists can offer diagnostic or therapeutic insights, they do.In this context, examining the concept of “patient centricity” makes sense. Generally, this term, when used in the medical realm, means patient involvement. But what if “patient centricity” means doing what is best for the patient? This can then be achieved with the radiologist playing the conventional role of the doctor’s doctor.To achieve this kind of patient centricity, radiologists will have to be masters of interpretation. They will have to read people as well as images to recognize, for example, when not to participate — or even try to do so — in “conversations.Recognizing this will keep them away from where they are not wanted, while allowing them to do what they do best. Radiologists will be appreciated by their colleagues, establishing their value to GPs who are searching for a diagnostic answer, as well as therapy-oriented specialists (such as orthopods and oncologists) who want to come up with the best way to care for their patients. Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, read more Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Imaging Market in U.S. Could Rise In Coming Years The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy. read more Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. Feature | Radiology Business | July 23, 2019 | Greg Freiherr Liars in Radiology Beware! Can you tell when someone is lying? read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Radiology Imaging | July 22, 2019 AHRA and Canon Medical Systems Support the 12th Annual Putting Patients First Program For the past twelve years, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. has partnered with read more Go to a few radiology meetings and you’ll know what radiology wants. In a word, radiology wants “more.” More involvement. More influence. More effect.The timing couldn’t be better. But making it work will require some change. Radiologists can make that change by putting the patient first.Traditionally, radiologists — for the most part — have been a kind of human black box. Data goes in as images. Conclusions come out. With the exception of interventional radiology, patient contact has been limited. Some pundits within radiology have proposed that radiologists become more patient oriented to better fit the growing emphasis on patient centricity in value medicine.I think that’s wrongheaded. It’s like saying a lion should become a zebra because stripes are “in.”Radiologists are discrete in their dealings with other physicians and incredibly specialized. Both will serve radiologists well in the future, if they are well applied.It makes sense, in this context, to consider a phenomenon that has been long in effect but until recently has been embraced only under certain circumstances. It is the tendency of some physicians other than radiologists to read their own patients’ exams.Physicians who tend to do so own often own — or have access to — imaging equipment, for example, obstetricians who interpret fetal ultrasound. Recently, however, with the advent of digital image and the ease of electronic transfer, images in some cases have taken on a euphemistic role.Consider the case of the general practitioner who asks the orthopod: “What do you think of this X-ray?” In this case, the GP is not asking for a diagnosis but whether the orthopod believes the patient needs surgery. Or, possibly more to the point, it is a question of whether the orthopod is willing to care for the patient.Were radiologists to butt into such conversations, they would be interlopers — their efforts not only unappreciated but unwelcome. Image Smart, People WiseIn such a world, radiologists must recognize what their colleagues need and then provide it. And, very importantly, they must resist the urge to teach their grandmothers to suck eggs. In other words, they must refrain from giving advice on subjects that their colleagues know at least as much or more about.As value medicine unfolds, the value of radiologists will be determined by how well they help the medical team help the patient. There will be no one, single way to do so. Radiologists’ roles will depend on circumstances.They will be like the star athlete who played quarterback in high school, safety in college and cornerback in the NFL. Different circumstances; different teams; different needs; different positions. This may be the mantra of radiologists in the future.What radiologists do and where they do it in value medicine will likely be determined by one all-important principle — doing whatever is best for the patient.In this way, radiology may uncork the potential of patient centricity so that it can put the value in value medicine. Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systemscenter_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough discusses bridging diversity gaps in medical physicsPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:05Loaded: 2.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Image courtesy of Pixabay. Body language expert Traci Brown spoke at the AHRA 2019 meeting on how to identify when a person is not being honest by their body language. She said medical imaging department administrators can use this knowledge to help in hiring decisions and managing staff.  The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Related Content Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr DR Advances Promote Imaging of Whole Spine Recent advances in… read more Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis Augmented Reality Versus 3-D Printing for Radiology Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and… read morelast_img read more

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